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Guidance for my french cleat wall install please!

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Forum topic by kaitlyn2004 posted 11-25-2020 05:27 PM 246 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kaitlyn2004

24 posts in 84 days


11-25-2020 05:27 PM

I’ve been trying to do a ton of research, definitely asked a lot of questions… finally ready to actually DO it now, though!

Context: I am renting, garage walls are drywalled+painted, I’m very beginner DIYer, garage floor slants down towards outside, studs are 24” apart.

I was looking to install the french cleat along one of my walls, let’s just say roughly 12’ wide by 8’ tall

My initial thought was to get 1/2” plywood backing (as I often see done) and then mount all my 3/4” cleats on to the plywood. Would be easier to manage/align/etc. on the floor vs fighting gravity, shimming stuff up, etc. etc. It would also protect the wall from fewer screw holes and banging/other damage as I put stuff on and take stuff off the wall. Then I’d take the panel (whatever size it ends up being) and mounting it to the wall on the studs. Only the plywood would be drilled into wall/studs, and the cleats would be glued+screwed to plywood (can you screw 3/4” into 1/2” or is the depth not really deep enough to hold?). I like that the plywood backer provides an extra surface to use, should I randomly want to nail/screw into it instead of using a cleat, or to provide a more permanent hold in an area, etc.

Other option is to just mount directly to the wall. Would focus strongly on getting the bottom cleat aligned and level on the wall, and from there use spacer blocks to put on the next level etc. etc. This would probably look cleaner though I worry it’ll be a bunch of extra holes in the wall, and the wall as a hole will surely be damaged whether just tons of surface marks or various scrapes/potential dents.

Which method would you advise for going with? And for either method, I’m going to be going across multiple studs, longer than the width of the cleat or the plywood. How would I ensure everything is secured “evenly” across the widths, so that i.e. the two ends of pieces aren’t really supported by studs, or only one side is, etc.


6 replies so far

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Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#1 posted 11-25-2020 05:38 PM

You are RENTING! Install nothing into the wall. Everything needs to be free standing so it can be moved or removed without a trace.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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kaitlyn2004

24 posts in 84 days


#2 posted 11-25-2020 05:45 PM



You are RENTING! Install nothing into the wall. Everything needs to be free standing so it can be moved or removed without a trace.

- Madmark2

I have permission to drill into the walls, just need to cover up. And filing drywall screw holes should be super simple, no?

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Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#3 posted 11-25-2020 06:06 PM

No. Patching and filling is not easy. Depending on the existing finish, number and location of holes, type of fasteners, the entire wall may need refinishing.

If you keep everything mobile it will work no matter where you move to, no having to rebuild after every move.

Wall based storage is 2D. Container based storage is 3D and holds more for a given wall space.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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kaitlyn2004

24 posts in 84 days


#4 posted 11-25-2020 06:09 PM


No. Patching and filling is not easy. Depending on the existing finish, number and location of holes, type of fasteners, the entire wall may need refinishing.

If you keep everything mobile it will work no matter where you move to, no having to rebuild after every move.

Wall based storage is 2D. Container based storage is 3D and holds more for a given wall space.

- Madmark2

Hmm, well I’ve never tried but I thought those tubes of spackle are pretty much designed for that and work really well? There’s ones that go on pink and dry white… fill it, let dry, lightly sand it – no?

With “typical shelving”, I’m going (maybe) still have to fasten to wall to avoid tipping over, and I end up with supporting braces in the front which sucks and makes some things less easy to access.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

8300 posts in 3241 days


#5 posted 11-25-2020 06:59 PM

I ripped a 1×6 on a 45 degree angle. I used 2 screws per stud and the 2 screws evenly spaced on the cabinets. they’ve been hanging for over 5 years with no problems.

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

117 posts in 1025 days


#6 posted 11-25-2020 09:26 PM

I’d recommend screwing into the studs as well. Depends, I suppose, on what you plan to hang from the cleats. I’d be concerned about 1/2” plywood not having enough strength to withstand a decent load.

The plywood protecting the wall is a good point, but I’d still attach the cleats to the studs through the plywood.

For what it’s worth, I’ve never had a tough go of patching screw holes. I find painting a pain in the posterior but that’s my cross to bear. :-)

-- Gary, Wisconsin

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