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Forum topic by Andybb posted 11-25-2020 12:37 AM 558 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


11-25-2020 12:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question walnut joining milling modern

If I could figure out how to do it I’d make this a blog, but I can’t so I won’t. and end-grain? avoid cutting up an 8/4×8x10 walnut board needlessly.

The top will be stabilized by 4 2”x4” steel “c” channel inlaid on the bottom side with elongated holes in them and the steel legs as well. Funny thing about the C channel. There is a place in Canada that sells a 40” long 2×1 c channel with predrilled elongated holes for $52 each! I got four 42” ones for $52 at the local steel supply. I have a drill press, a die grinder and black paint!

-- Andy - Seattle USA


22 replies so far

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Jim Jakosh

25723 posts in 4074 days


#1 posted 11-25-2020 01:21 AM

Are those 4 pieces glued together in that first photo?

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#2 posted 11-25-2020 01:27 AM


Are those 4 pieces glued together in that first photo?

Jim

- Jim Jakosh

No. They are just leaning up against the cabinet. They join up quite nicely when laid flat. I’ll use cauls and/or biscuits for the final glue up.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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CWWoodworking

1302 posts in 1147 days


#3 posted 11-25-2020 03:10 AM

Why the c channels?

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#4 posted 11-25-2020 03:49 AM


Why the c channels?

- CWWoodworking

Keeps the boards from moving/cupping.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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SMP

3171 posts in 874 days


#5 posted 11-25-2020 04:24 AM


Why the c channels?

- CWWoodworking

Keeps the boards from moving/cupping.

- Andybb

8/4 walnut will probably keep the c channel from bending.

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#6 posted 11-25-2020 04:40 AM

Somehow I knew the c channel would be the topic of discussion.

I’ve seen enough people use it like here and here and here that I thought I’d try it. It is certainly worth the $52 insurance policy a few years down the line IMHO. Besides, overbuilding is a thing I do. :-)

But, lest we digress….Anybody got any ideas on how to trim over the end-grain or how to get my inch back?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

13543 posts in 3348 days


#7 posted 11-25-2020 05:37 AM

Why did you bring up the C channel if you didn’t want to talk about it?

Anyway, what is the question? I’ve read it twice and maybe it’s the 2 glasses of bourbon impairing my brain, but I don’t know what you are asking.
re: ”...and end-grain? avoid cutting up an 8/4×8×10 walnut board needlessly.”

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#8 posted 11-25-2020 06:05 AM


Why did you bring up the C channel if you didn t want to talk about it?

Anyway, what is the question? I ve read it twice and maybe it s the 2 glasses of bourbon impairing my brain, but I don t know what you are asking.
re: ”...and end-grain? avoid cutting up an 8/4×8×10 walnut board needlessly.”

- Woodknack

Sorry. I brought it up because it is a question about wood movement along the ends of the table and how to avoid it splitting the trim if it moves or if I even need to worry about it. I just assumed that someone would ask about wood movement after the glue-up. Maybe I was wrong.

I’m asking if there is a good method for putting trim across the face of the end-grain (as the customer doesn’t like the look of a bread-board style end but likes the trim idea) or if anyone has a better idea of how to get back the 1” that I need for width other than adding in a fifth board and then trimming to 44” total, thus using up a nice piece of lumber that could be used for other things. It’s 13 board feet at 11.25 /bf

If I don’t have to use the 5th board I can cut it in half and glue up a matching coffee table for him.

So, can I wrap a 3/4” strip of nice contrasting trim around the entire tabletop without it splitting over time? That would accomplish a few things.
1. Saving the 5th board for a matching coffee table that I can sell him (or the start of my long put off Malouf Rocker)
2. Getting me a min of 44” in width
3. Adding what I think will be an attractive accent to the table
4. If I do use the 5th board I can trim the top to 46” and make a faux live-edge

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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SMP

3171 posts in 874 days


#9 posted 11-25-2020 06:09 AM

I mean, i suppose you could wrap the 4/4 on the sides of the 8/4, but that kind of defeats the purpose of using the 8/4 IMO. Thats usually a way to make a 4/4 top “appear” thicker from the sides. But then you have that seam right where people are looking and resting their elbows etc. Kind of cheapens the look as compared fo 8/4.

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Woodknack

13543 posts in 3348 days


#10 posted 11-25-2020 06:16 AM

Not unless you live in a very dry climate. Even breadboards don’t line up perfectly about twice a year in humid climates. Walnut is a medium grain, I would suggest sanding the end grain very fine, filling, then sanding again, and it will look great. Maybe add an undercut bevel. Ugh, being an inch shy in width sucks. I’ve added filler strips and don’t like the look, unless the grain is straight and blends exceptionally well, it looks half-assed. I’ve also glued on an extra board and then ripped it down and IMO that’s even worse. Every time I’ve tried to save money on something prominent, the appearance suffers, but maybe you can blend it better than me.
edit, you edited your post while I was typing.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#11 posted 11-25-2020 07:04 AM

^ Yeah. I agree.

So….Maybe I’m not explaining this well. The top has not been glued up yet. I can rip the 5 milled boards I have into widths to equal 44” with no problem. They are all 10-12” wide now. I’d probably put the 12” one in the middle and add 2 9” on each side then 2 7” boards on the outside to equal 44”. I was just looking for a way to salvage the last board is all. My original plan was to use my track saw to add an edge like the one in this video and finish with Rubio Monocoat which is what I think I’ll do now that I have mulled it over. My customer (and I too) like this look. I might still be able to get a small coffee table out of what’s left.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#12 posted 11-25-2020 09:07 AM

Should look like this on the underside with the c-channel and legs installed. The c-channel might be overkill but for $50 in materials, better safe than sorry. The customer is 30 and the best friend of one of my sons. I want their families eating at this table 20 years from now.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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CWWoodworking

1302 posts in 1147 days


#13 posted 11-25-2020 11:06 AM

If it is indeed only 1” or less, try to convince customer that it is what it is. Personally I’d rather have 43” of wide boards than 44” of wide boards plus a tack on piece. Or just trim all the boards down a little to get 44”. Ya it’s expensive wood but the costumers paying for it, not you. And you can still use it for other things.

Please don’t all a trim piece on the end. Nothing looks cheaper/tackier than this.

A back bevel looks nice. Just round over the top side too. More comfortable and will wear better.

I guess go ahead with the metal if you like. IMO it’s not doing much. Proper glue ups, and properly milled wood keep tops flat.

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#14 posted 11-25-2020 11:35 AM



If it is indeed only 1” or less, try to convince customer that it is what it is. Personally I’d rather have 43” of wide boards than 44” of wide boards plus a tack on piece. Or just trim all the boards down a little to get 44”. Ya it’s expensive wood but the costumers paying for it, not you. And you can still use it for other things.

Please don’t all a trim piece on the end. Nothing looks cheaper/tackier than this.

A back bevel looks nice. Just round over the top side too. More comfortable and will wear better.

I guess go ahead with the metal if you like. IMO it’s not doing much. Proper glue ups, and properly milled wood keep tops flat.

- CWWoodworking

Has to be at least 44” as it is the required dimension of a particular War strategy board game. There won’t be any pieces tacked on. It will be symmetrical. I like the idea of the center board being wider than the rest so it doesn’t have that picnic table look. The center board will be somewhere between 10 and 12” and the others will be 8 or 9”.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Robert

4292 posts in 2449 days


#15 posted 11-25-2020 11:37 AM

I like the back bevel, too. If you were going to wrap it, I was going to suggest using 2” trim board and treat it like a breadboard

Another option I did on the ends on my table was a gentle arc. Barely noticeable but it really adds a good look.

If the top looks anything like the bottom, it will be stunning. Please post a pic when you’re finished.

And I agree the C channels are cheap insurance. You never know what the heck will happen with a large top once it’s living in the home a while.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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