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Wetting boards between sanding?

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Forum topic by jody495 posted 11-24-2020 11:27 PM 455 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jody495

44 posts in 3589 days


11-24-2020 11:27 PM

Hello woodworkers. I would like your thoughts are about wiping down boards with water to raise the grain between sanding. Thank you


9 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10921 posts in 4616 days


#1 posted 11-24-2020 11:30 PM

I’ve done it when using water based stains and dyes. Otherwise I don’t remember doing it much.

View pottz's profile

pottz

13687 posts in 1952 days


#2 posted 11-24-2020 11:53 PM

as loren said only when using water based products which i rarely do.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

910 posts in 355 days


#3 posted 11-25-2020 01:12 AM

If your finish will be nitro lacquer, it’s pretty standard to use a “damp” cloth to raise the fibers and cut them off by sanding prior to spraying. No experience with other finishes but works great for guitars!

-- Darrel

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Woodknack

13543 posts in 3348 days


#4 posted 11-25-2020 05:39 AM

Also helps with shellac, which also raises the grain, although I rarely bother. Instead I sand back the first 2 coats.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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jody495

44 posts in 3589 days


#5 posted 11-25-2020 10:34 AM

Thanks for the information.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4292 posts in 2449 days


#6 posted 11-25-2020 11:39 AM

I know people do it, but IMO there is no advantage of wetting prior to using a water based dye or stain.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6729 posts in 3461 days


#7 posted 11-25-2020 01:52 PM

If you wait until you apply your first film coat, then smooth it…..it locks the fibers in place and you’re good to go.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

402 posts in 565 days


#8 posted 11-25-2020 05:48 PM

If I want a smoother finish, I raise the grain, doesn’t matter what kind of finish. I like to raise the grain whenever doing water or alcohol based finishes. I also only raise the grain up to 180 or 220. Rarely do I go beyond that, and definitely not prior to staining.

When doing oil finishes, I will sand in the first coat a lot of the time to fill in the pores. But, that’;s a whole different thing.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

8248 posts in 3234 days


#9 posted 11-25-2020 07:08 PM

I use a spray bottle with water and set it out in the sun to dry. I do it with almost every project. Seems to work well for me.

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