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Delta table saw power switch

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Forum topic by ed23 posted 11-21-2020 11:33 PM 313 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ed23

71 posts in 151 days


11-21-2020 11:33 PM

First of all, dont most of us cut to the right of the blade. Why is the power switch to the far left? Then I tried to connect my foot switch and it wont turn the saw on, only off. So I turn it on from the left, cross the front of the machine to get to the right and load the board in. Then turn it off with the foot switch. Must be a better way.


12 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8289 posts in 3118 days


#1 posted 11-21-2020 11:40 PM

Just move the switch if you don’t like where it is.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: The switch on my Unisaw is on the right ;)

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1323 posts in 2480 days


#2 posted 11-21-2020 11:41 PM

Sounds like the saw has a magnetic start switch. You need to verify how you’ve wired in the foot switch.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1829 posts in 1508 days


#3 posted 11-22-2020 12:31 AM

The operator should be to the left of the blade with a right side fence. In a pinch situation it is assumed that you are controlling the stock with your right hand.

Releasing the stock to hit a right side switch would invite kickback. Having the switch on your left allows you to power off the saw with your, free, left hand or hip.

This is why the power switch cord to the saw is so short to prevent cross side mounting. This is an intentional safety feature.

Foot switch with sustained operation could be accidentally activated.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1371 posts in 1879 days


#4 posted 11-22-2020 12:41 AM

You cut where you are the most comfortable cutting….the switch needs to be where you want it on your saw.

Couldnt tell you how many times I’ve went from operating several saws at the shop to going home to my shop and having to look cause the switch is in a different place on all the saws…

View ed23's profile

ed23

71 posts in 151 days


#5 posted 11-22-2020 12:46 AM

If you are on the left of the blade with a right fence you could cause a bind by pushing it to the fence. I am to the right of the right fence.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1829 posts in 1508 days


#6 posted 11-22-2020 12:53 AM

If you’re ripping a long board you CANNOT stand behind the blade because the material is in the way.

Ed23:
Its dangerous to press the stock away from the fence and into the blade so you can’t safely stand to the right. Also the wider the rip (sheet goods) the further you would be from the blade.

You should wax your fence specifically so it doesn’t bind when feeding. The reason fences lock so tight is to resist the lateral forces on it as you feed against it. You never see featherbowrds pushing away from the fence, why should you?

No, your only safe spot to stand is to the left of the blade pressing into the fence. Learn to be comfortable working from that position.

You can stand behind the blade on short rips but that puts you in line for kickback.

Safety is improved when your position is consistent. Learn to work the saw as designed. You shouldn’t “do your own thing” where safety is concerned.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

688 posts in 306 days


#7 posted 11-22-2020 01:13 AM



If you re ripping a long board you CANNOT stand behind the blade because the material is in the way.

Ed23:
Its dangerous to press the stock away from the fence and into the blade so you can t safely stand to the right. Also the wider the rip (sheet goods) the further you would be from the blade.

You should wax your fence specifically so it doesn t bind when feeding. The reason fences lock so tight is to resist the lateral forces on it as you feed against it. You never see featherbowrds pushing away from the fence, why should you?

No, your only safe spot to stand is to the left of the blade pressing into the fence. Learn to be comfortable working from that position.

You can stand behind the blade on short rips but that puts you in line for kickback.

Safety is improved when your position is consistent. Learn to work the saw as designed. You shouldn t “do your own thing” where safety is concerned.

- Madmark2


Yup.

-- Darrel

View ed23's profile

ed23

71 posts in 151 days


#8 posted 11-22-2020 01:25 AM

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3337 posts in 4447 days


#9 posted 11-22-2020 01:40 AM



Watch at 2:30
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOhZxvgkWNM

- ed23

Notice that when he makes the cut properly, he is standing to the left of the blade:

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View SMP's profile

SMP

2905 posts in 825 days


#10 posted 11-22-2020 02:09 AM

I’m usually to the left of the blade, unless i am doing something unusual with a bevel where i need the fence on the left, then i am to the right. I guess most inportantly is know where it is and make it second nature to reach that spot.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1829 posts in 1508 days


#11 posted 11-22-2020 02:20 AM

I stand to the right when using the taper jig. My palms on the fence with my fingers pulling the jig tight to the fence.

But for 99% of normal work the rule is stand left (for a right side fence) for safety.

The OFF switch being where you can find it without looking is a good thing.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1565 posts in 3507 days


#12 posted 11-22-2020 10:06 AM

When ripping boards on my Unisaw the switch is on the left and that’s the perfect spot. I either use my left hand or leg to turn off the saw. The school where I taught purchased a jet to replace an old powermatic and the switch was on the right and I hated it there. I was always reaching to the left to turn off the jet out of habit.

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