LumberJocks

Rikon 10-325 bandsaw rehab

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by BusterBrown posted 11-21-2020 02:56 AM 584 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BusterBrown's profile

BusterBrown

45 posts in 2791 days


11-21-2020 02:56 AM

So, I picked up a green-era Rikon bandsaw from a storage unit sale for $100. It was a bit of gamble as I don’t have any experience with a ‘real’ bandsaw and didn’t have an opportunity to do any real testing. Worst case, I figure I can part it out for what I have in it.

The trunnion is toast but fortunately Rikon still stocks replacements and a new one is en route. I’m guessing it was knocked over and may have sustained other damage as a result. Any ideas on what I should look for?

Possibly related, there is some play in the bar that holds the upper guides. Is that normal?

I have confirmed it runs. It kept tripping the breaker on my crappy 15A circuit so I rewired it for 220V and was able to start it on my table saw circuit. That was my first 220 conversion and damn was it easy. The dust collector’s days on 115 are numbered.


17 replies so far

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

7320 posts in 3385 days


#1 posted 11-21-2020 03:04 AM

Even having to replace a few parts that is a great price.. Having to go through it as you see what works is also good. get to know how it works and such..

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1337 posts in 2537 days


#2 posted 11-21-2020 01:16 PM

If 110V it’s 220V. If 115V then it’s 230V. But todays normal voltage is 120V/240V. The advantage of switching from 120V to 240V is not worth the wiring cost in most cases.

View OldBull's profile

OldBull

309 posts in 271 days


#3 posted 11-21-2020 01:37 PM

You probably already know this but if the blade guard lock in the back is not tightened down it will be loose, sorry if that was obvious.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7911 posts in 3890 days


#4 posted 11-21-2020 02:20 PM

Great find! I have had mine for several years and back then I paid $675 at WC. This is a great saw, and I pretty much keep a 3/4in TW resaw blade on it all the time. So much so, I ended up buying the Rikon 10in model for cutting curves and smaller stuff.

I also see you have it mounted on a roller platform, as do I. RE the 240v rewire: Prefect! 8-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View BusterBrown's profile

BusterBrown

45 posts in 2791 days


#5 posted 11-21-2020 08:11 PM



If 110V it s 220V. If 115V then it s 230V. But todays normal voltage is 120V/240V. The advantage of switching from 120V to 240V is not worth the wiring cost in most cases.

- WhyMe

Thanks for explaining that. I get the doubling/halving but never understood why you’d see 110/220 one place, 115/230 somewhere else and 120/240 in yet another source. So it’s ‘proper’ to use 120/240 when referring to modern setups?

View BusterBrown's profile

BusterBrown

45 posts in 2791 days


#6 posted 11-21-2020 08:14 PM



You probably already know this but if the blade guard lock in the back is not tightened down it will be loose, sorry if that was obvious.

- OldBull

Thanks, that took care of that problem. I spent a good amount of time studying how it was attached and couldn’t figure out how it would tighten. Never occurred to me to try the knob right in front of me! My only previous bandsaw experience is with a little 9” ‘toy’ so this is all mew ground.

View OldBull's profile

OldBull

309 posts in 271 days


#7 posted 11-21-2020 10:10 PM

Glad my very limited time could help, my bandsaw is less than a month old so we are in the same boat. Mine was drifting badly until I realized the blade was not tight enough, whatever you do do NOT trust the tension gauge in the window, they are not reliable. I also watched the much recommended “Snodgrass bandsaw clinic”, it will teach you alot, it is here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

I however had to modify his blade placement a little on my rikon as it did not like the gullet in the center as much , at least I think so?

From what I have read a new blade is usually a good thing as well, good luck and send me your tips when you learn them. Be sure to loosen the blade by moving the tension lever in the back when not in use, The rubber tires on the pulleys will flatten with tension left on them for a long time. Urethane tires are supposed to be better because you won’t have to bother with glue, they don’t need it. If the saw was left with tension on the blade I suspect your tires may have a flat spot and need to be replaced, they also get old and need replaced as well. The bearings on the blade guide are occaisionally replaced as well. There is an identical guide and bearings under the table as well.

Donny
OldBull

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4015 posts in 2470 days


#8 posted 11-21-2020 10:55 PM

FWIW – Broken Trunion on band saw is very common damage. Cast iron is not a strong metal.

Reason is simple:
Trunion brackets are s not designed to support the weight of entire saw, or to be used as structural feature.

- Beginners that don’t know how fragile the trunion brackets can be, and tend to grab a band saw by table to move to move shop. If you push down too hard or lift up the saw; they will often crack, if not break entirely.

- The table must always be removed for transport. Mfg always ship band saw with tables removed. If you make mistake of running a tie down strap across the cast iron table hauling it home on trailer and hit a bump; ‘poof’ it is broken. Have seen table saw extension tables break off by tie down straps during transport too.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

369 posts in 2794 days


#9 posted 11-25-2020 09:18 AM

I love my RIKON.
Speaking of tension arm, a trick I learned here on LJ, is to wrap your power cord around the tension arm. It’s just as important to relieve the tension as it is to apply tension when starting the saw. They can be a pain resetting the blade…

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

View syenefarmer's profile

syenefarmer

566 posts in 4056 days


#10 posted 11-26-2020 12:31 AM

Just in case your saw didn’t come with an Owners Manual, here is a link to the manual for the blue version of the 10-325. https://www.rikontools.com/manuals/10-325.pdf

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1621 posts in 3563 days


#11 posted 11-26-2020 06:47 PM

Looks just like mine I bought from Woodcraft 11 years ago. Great saw! Go to Rikonparts.com part no. 173A P10-325-173A If that is the part you need. $79

View BusterBrown's profile

BusterBrown

45 posts in 2791 days


#12 posted 11-30-2020 12:17 AM

Thanks for all the links and replies. The new trunnion arrived over the weekend and seems to be the right fit. I was hoping to get the table reinstalled and perform some test cuts but am having some big problems getting the blade set.

The saw came with 2 blades: 3/4” and 5/8”. The 3/4” was on the saw and the tension lever was engaged. So, I may have issues with the tires, blade or both. I tried centering the gullet on the upper wheel (a la Snodgrass) but that seemed to push the blade too far forward on the bottom wheel. I switched to centering the blade on the top wheel and that helped with the positioning on the bottom wheel but it still wanted to ride further forward than I think it should.

It seems secure enough but I can’t imagine its intended to ride completely forward of the guide housing (vs in the slot that appears to be cut out for it).

And I think this is confirmed by how close it is to the door when closed.

At that point I switched to the 5/8” blade. I had an easier time getting it centered on the bottom wheel but could not get it tensioned.

I realize the built in scales are only to be used as a ballpark, but this seems … excessive.

I thought the 5/8” may have been stretched but when I lined it up with the 3/4” they were almost identical. Next I tried measuring, thinking they both may be stretched and got ~111 1/4” for the 5/8” and ~111 1/8” for the 3/4”.

Is that enough to throw things off are are those variances within the norm?

I think the next step may be a new blade and probably tires but figured this was a good time to get some feedback.

Two other things I noticed that may be related to my problems:

- It’s set to the lower of the 2 speeds. Is that the default or should I be on the high speed setting?
- The top wheel has some play in it. If I grip the outer edge I can ‘wobble’ it. Is that normal? The bolt in the middle is very tight.

View BusterBrown's profile

BusterBrown

45 posts in 2791 days


#13 posted 11-30-2020 12:20 AM

On a separate note, the saw had a lot of dust in it and I noticed the dust port had a couple ‘restrictions.’

I was able to knock the wood bushing out. What about the metal plate? It doesn’t look removable. Should I drill some holes in it or is there enough air flow even with it in place?

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1621 posts in 3563 days


#14 posted 11-30-2020 01:43 AM

3/4” blade is the widest blade you can use. I have 3/4” carbide and the pictures show where it rides on the wheel on my saw.

View BusterBrown's profile

BusterBrown

45 posts in 2791 days


#15 posted 11-30-2020 02:01 AM



3/4” blade is the widest blade you can use. I have 3/4” carbide and the pictures show where it rides on the wheel on my saw.

- Woodmaster1

Thanks! So does that put the blade in the notch of the lower guide housing (and away from the door)?

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com