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Drill Press Runout - where to start?

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Forum topic by EarlS posted 11-13-2020 01:42 PM 1018 views 0 times favorited 45 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EarlS

4205 posts in 3316 days


11-13-2020 01:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: drill press run out runout

I recently bought a used Porter-Cable PCB660DP type 2 drill press and it has quite a bit of runout (for non-mechanical folks like me – bit wobble). I didn’t measure it, but the bit wobble is very noticeable.

I watched a couple of videos that suggest that the arbor is likely worn and needs to be replaced. Any suggestions from the more mechanically inclined folks on what the best approach would be?

Should I try to pop it out and look it over or is there something else I should try first? As I mentioned, I’m not particularly mechanically inclined so I need some basic help to get me on the right path.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"


45 replies so far

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BlasterStumps

1887 posts in 1408 days


#1 posted 11-13-2020 02:02 PM

Is it a taper mount chuck that is on that model? If so, maybe start by removing it, inspecting both tapers (inside the chuck and on the shaft) and if it looks good, reinstalling it. Might even check the runout again before putting the chuck back on just to see if it is still there without the chuck. This is probably all bad advice, I am just going by my experience with an old DP where the chuck didn’t seat right.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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Redoak49

5022 posts in 2957 days


#2 posted 11-13-2020 02:28 PM

Absolutely good advice to check the Chuck and arbor. And check without the Chuck in place.

If you do not have a dial indicator and mount, it is a good time to get one at Harbor . They are helpful for these type of problems.

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dbw

495 posts in 2605 days


#3 posted 11-13-2020 02:49 PM

Runout can be additive, i.e., The quill, arbor, and chuck can collectively add to he runout. I subscribe to the KIS principle (keep it simple). Remove the chuck/arbor and observe the spindle while it’s running. Separate the chuck from the arbor and put the arbor back up into the spindle. Observe it while it’s running. Put the chuck back on and … you get the idea. Technically you need to use a dial indicator and a base of some sort. If you do use a dial indicator you turn the spindle by hand. DO NOT turn the machine on. One can buy high quality arbors and chucks (such as Jacobs) but high quality parts may cost more than the machine is worth. FWIW I have a PC drill press and mine has a bit of runout. I pinpointed the runout to the chuck. I have learned to live with it. One of these days I’m going to get a better drill press but since I rarely use it replacing it is a low priority. You Tube has a lot of videos on drill press diagnosis and repair. If you do replace the arbor/chuck make sure you get the correct tapers. Probably Morse # 2 and Jacobs #3.

-- Measure twice, cut once. If you cut it too short get a wood stretcher.

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HokieKen

15939 posts in 2107 days


#4 posted 11-13-2020 03:33 PM

As stated, start by removing the chuck and arbor then clean the mating surfaces well. While you have it out, see if there is any runout in the spindle itself. Another thing to check is whether the runout gets worse as the quill is advanced. Until you know whether the runout is in the spindle/quill assembly or the arbor chuck, it’s hard to proceed.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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dbw

495 posts in 2605 days


#5 posted 11-13-2020 06:15 PM

One more thing I meant to tell you: If you do wind up using a dial indicator you need to take a reading know as TIR (total indicator reading). This means you include the entire swing of the needle as it goes from 0 to the right of 0 and/or to the left of 0. Somewhere there is a specification for TIR for your drill press. I doubt you’ll find it. In my case I have a TIR of .008”. I have no clue how this stacks up against the specs. I hope this is not too much information but I see you are an engineer so information is probably in your blood. I was an engineer in a previous life and for me there is no such thing as too much information.

-- Measure twice, cut once. If you cut it too short get a wood stretcher.

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EarlS

4205 posts in 3316 days


#6 posted 11-13-2020 06:57 PM

Here’s what I came up with:

spindle only = 0.0035
spindle and arbor = 0.006
spindle, arbor, chuck = 0.045

These were taken by setting the dial to 0, turning the spindle thru 2 complete rotations and recording the range from the dial. I did this 4 times, pulling the dial pointer back and resetting it to 0 after each time.

I also inspected the arbor and didn’t see any grooves or signs of excessive wear. I also wiped off all of the surfaces to make sure there wasn’t any material on them that would cause problems.

Based on these numbers, my uninformed opinion is that the problem is in the chuck?? Does that mean I need a new one or is there something that can be done to it?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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HokieKen

15939 posts in 2107 days


#7 posted 11-13-2020 07:09 PM

Probably better off just getting a new one if that’s the one that came with it from the factory. I’d get a new arbor while you’re at it. I’m a huge fan of keyless chucks for drill presses and a big fan of Rohm chucks when it comes to bang for your buck. You’ll same some $ with a keyed chuck but the convenience is worth the extra cash IMHO.

I would do another check of the spindle runout with it extended and see how much worse it gets just for a baseline while you’re at it. Also, you did indicate in the taper and not on the OD, right?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Fred Hargis

6729 posts in 3461 days


#8 posted 11-13-2020 07:31 PM

I know just replacing the chuck on my DP solved my run out problems. Actually, I’m not sure much can be done with a chuck that’s off that far.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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dbw

495 posts in 2605 days


#9 posted 11-13-2020 10:21 PM



Here s what I came up with:

spindle only = 0.0035
spindle and arbor = 0.006
spindle, arbor, chuck = 0.045

These were taken by setting the dial to 0, turning the spindle thru 2 complete rotations and recording the range from the dial. I did this 4 times, pulling the dial pointer back and resetting it to 0 after each time.

I also inspected the arbor and didn t see any grooves or signs of excessive wear. I also wiped off all of the surfaces to make sure there wasn t any material on them that would cause problems.

Based on these numbers, my uninformed opinion is that the problem is in the chuck?? Does that mean I need a new one or is there something that can be done to it?

- EarlS


.045 is quite a bit. I believe the consensus of opinion is to replace the chuck and arbor. How much is this machine worth? Perhaps it’s not worth replacing the chuck/arbor and just replacing the entire machine?

-- Measure twice, cut once. If you cut it too short get a wood stretcher.

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EarlS

4205 posts in 3316 days


#10 posted 11-13-2020 10:45 PM

I’m probably still $$ ahead buying a new arbor and chuck. The DP was $200.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Foghorn

910 posts in 355 days


#11 posted 11-13-2020 11:33 PM



I m probably still $$ ahead buying a new arbor and chuck. The DP was $200.

- EarlS

I may have an arbor and chuck that I took off my Steel City press when I first bought it. Nothing wrong with it, but I got a screaming deal on a Golden Goose chuck at the time and replaced the stock one. I’m assuming shipping from Canada would be around $15.00. If you want it, let me know. Can’t recall what the taper was on the press side but can look it up in the manual.

-- Darrel

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EarlS

4205 posts in 3316 days


#12 posted 11-13-2020 11:36 PM

Darrel – I might just take you up on that. It looks like I need an MT2 spindle taper and a JT3 chuck taper.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Richard Lee

368 posts in 1743 days


#13 posted 11-13-2020 11:53 PM

Dont know the drill press but it might have an adjustment on the spindle, the casting where the spindle slides in is sometimes split and has a bolt to tighten up.

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Foghorn

910 posts in 355 days


#14 posted 11-14-2020 01:57 AM



Darrel – I might just take you up on that. It looks like I need an MT2 spindle taper and a JT3 chuck taper.

- EarlS

I’ll check out the arbor tapers and let you know. Regardless, the chuck should work fine and you may need to pick up an arbor. Cheers

-- Darrel

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Foghorn

910 posts in 355 days


#15 posted 11-14-2020 02:02 AM

Looks good. Spindle is MT#2 and chuck is JT3. PM me and I can arrange to mail to you once I check my garage sale boxes to make sure it’s all there.

-- Darrel

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