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Forum topic by Sanderguy777 posted 11-02-2020 10:37 PM 756 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


11-02-2020 10:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: scrollsaw refurbished advice

I’m in the market for a scroll saw, mainly for cutting out bird feeder parts. I dont plan on doing anything intricate NOW, but will probably tinker around with it later of I have the option.

I have been looking at Craigslist for a week or so off and on and saw a good deal on an old 4” homecraft (the Delta sub brand) jointer and tablesaw, as well as a scroll saw. The issue is that I dont know whether the scrollsaw works (the motor powers the tablesaw and jointer in its current setup) and the scroll saw is an old Ward’s model (Montgomery Ward’s, I assume. Can anyone confirm if they MADE these, or if they were decent quality?)

My current set up is to use my refurbished Craftsman table saw to mill the cedar fence pickets and then a hand plane to smooth the faces, but even a 4” jointer that worked well would make that process better and the scroll saw would REALLY simplify and improve any carving blanks (since my old coping saw is a painfully slow and NOT square at all).

Features/needs list:
1 working saw
2 only plan on using it for 1x material (2x will be exceedingly rare)
3 needs to be reliable
4 under $100 ($200 at the most) Wants
5 repairable would be nice
6 a blower would be nice (the one with locline, not the 1/4” air hose that cracks after 2 years)
7 works right away (if not, then I need it to be a quick fix)

I’m just looking for advice on what older saws you guys have that you might recommend. I can’t afford a new dewalt, and it looks like everything below $400 new is the same model with different paint colors.
Thank

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?


18 replies so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3628 posts in 4403 days


#1 posted 11-02-2020 10:46 PM

Go to Amazon, search “scroll saw” then on the sidebar click $100-$200. You’ll see a bunch of brands. Lots of them look like they may be made by the same company. That being said I used to have a Hitachi that I hardly used because I found a like new Dewalt that was extremely inexpensive. I though it might be broken or hot, but it worked out. A like new Dewalt for $75 on craigslist. That will never happen again.

Anyway, i gave my Hitachi to my son in law with about 4 hours use on it. It was a good saw like many of the others in that price range on the market. At under $200, or $165 in the case, it was doing the job and seemed feature capable and looked well made.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#2 posted 11-02-2020 11:02 PM



Go to Amazon, search “scroll saw” then on the sidebar click $100-$200. You ll see a bunch of brands. Lots of them look like they may be made by the same company. That being said I used to have a Hitachi that I hardly used because I found a like new Dewalt that was extremely inexpensive. I though it might be broken or hot, but it worked out. A like new Dewalt for $75 on craigslist. That will never happen again.

Anyway, i gave my Hitachi to my son in law with about 4 hours use on it. It was a good saw like many of the others in that price range on the market. At under $200, or $165 in the case, it was doing the job and seemed feature capable and looked well made.

- Craftsman on the lake

I’m not opposed to the $100-200 saws except that (at least in other tools/saws) the older ones are normally better quality and have better motors. At least that is the theory…

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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Planeman40

1532 posts in 3726 days


#3 posted 11-02-2020 11:07 PM

Whatever you do, stay away from the “return spring” type. Get a parallel arm type that allows you to get a good tension on the blade. Power scroll sawing is a sometimes thing for me, so I bought a low cost (probably Chinese) saw with the parallel arm arrangement and it does all I want.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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MrUnix

8349 posts in 3164 days


#4 posted 11-02-2020 11:40 PM

Montgomery wards, like Sears (Craftsman), never made anything – they just re-branded other peoples stuff. Most of the scroll saws sold by them were made by Powr-Kraft and were good solid machines. But without seeing it work, it is a gamble since replacement parts will be very difficult to find for that machine.

Most any scroll saw can do 1” stock, and most can probably do up to 2” as well, although it is slow going at that size. Not all of the smaller saws can do up to or over 2” though, so check the specs if that is critical.

I would just be diligent and keep an eye out on CL and the other usual places. I ran across my 18” Delta at a garage sale when I wasn’t even really looking for one… that’s when you always find the best deals ;)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#5 posted 11-03-2020 12:01 AM


Whatever you do, stay away from the “return spring” type. Get a parallel arm type that allows you to get a good tension on the blade. Power scroll sawing is a sometimes thing for me, so I bought a low cost (probably Chinese) saw with the parallel arm arrangement and it does all I want.

- Planeman40

Is that this?

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3628 posts in 4403 days


#6 posted 11-03-2020 02:20 AM


Whatever you do, stay away from the “return spring” type. Get a parallel arm type that allows you to get a good tension on the blade. Power scroll sawing is a sometimes thing for me, so I bought a low cost (probably Chinese) saw with the parallel arm arrangement and it does all I want.

- Planeman40

Is that this?

- Sanderguy777


I’ve had one like that long ago…. I called it thumper. Scroll saws are one instance where old caste iron units can’t match newer machines. Sometimes other tools yes, but scroll saws uhuh.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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bigblockyeti

6913 posts in 2686 days


#7 posted 11-03-2020 02:25 AM

Personally I would look for a used RBI Hawk. My first search revealed this one, though it’s not under $200, it’s a fraction of what it would have been new.
https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/2873300262901085

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#8 posted 11-03-2020 04:11 AM



Personally I would look for a used RBI Hawk. My first search revealed this one, though it s not under $200, it s a fraction of what it would have been new.
https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/2873300262901085

- bigblockyeti


I will take that into consideration. I know it would last longer and work better, but I dont do anything professionally, so I am not sure if it would be worth the extra cost.

Does anyone think a 26” model is worth $60 more over a 20”? Again, I do small stuff, and my shop is small, so I have no reason for it NOW, but I might some day…

The big thing I’m thinking of though, is, if I spend $200-300, I would only get 1 tool. If I got a cheaper model used (90s or 2000s craftsman for example) for $50 to $100 then I might find a good bandsaw some time and end up with both for $300.
Though the reality is that getting a good tool in working condition is more important and cheaper than getting a cheap tool that needs TLC and several days’ labor and a few parts.

So after thinking it out through this eternal post, I think I’ll at least get a good working model (90s at the oldest) that runs well so that I dont end up with random problems and junk to deal with

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#9 posted 11-10-2020 07:31 AM

So…
I bought a saw.

I got a Delta q3 (40-650) for $50. I was thinking that getting an RBI would be a better choice since I may or may not make any money (in which case the saw would just be another tool that was a “bad investment”).

The table top was kind of rusty mostly just surface rust, but a couple spots that it actually ate into the metal. After a liberal application of elbow grease and wire wheel on my drill, the table looks good.

What I’m wondering what I should paint the stand with. It is original to the saw (the saw is in almost mint condition, it is REALLY great, other than a very few spots of rust), and has much Korean rust than the saw itself. Mostly the bolts. I was thinking of taking it apart, sanding it down, then hitting it with the same engine enamel I use for japaning on hand planes.
If I did that, these are my color options

I dont know if there is a better paint (aka cheaper, but that gives a good finish) that is worth checking out?

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#10 posted 11-10-2020 07:37 AM

Also, the bottom of the table has a couple places with surface rust, will wire wheeling that, then hitting it with metal primer help keep the bare metal from rusting again, or should I clearcoat the whole bottom of the table (the paint is in perfect condition, just the 45° and 90° set screws and 4 bolt holes are exposed metal.

I realize it is a $50 saw, and that I am WAY over exerting myself in man hours, but I didn’t do some of the stuff I wanted to do on my tablesaw, and I dont ever plan on opening either tool up again for anything more than a bellows repair or motor replacement. I want the tool to be perfect so that i don’t have to worry about it.

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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MrUnix

8349 posts in 3164 days


#11 posted 11-10-2020 06:34 PM

Nice get… I have it’s precursor, the 40-601, and love it. Also have been keeping an eye out for the Q-3 as a possible upgrade, but they do not show up on the used market that often. I really like the slightly more aggressive cutting you get with the C-Arm compared to other designs.

In the condition you say it is, If it were me, I’d just clean it up and start making sawdust! Spend your cash on some good blades. If you really want it to ‘be perfect’ so you don’t have to worry about it, then replace or clean/repack the bearings. It’s the mechanical bits that will knock you out of commission, not the cosmetic ones.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#12 posted 11-11-2020 03:08 AM

Firs of all, I meant “much more rust” not “much Korean rust” not sure what spell check thought I meant there lol


Nice get… I have it s precursor, the 40-601, and love it. Also have been keeping an eye out for the Q-3 as a possible upgrade, but they do not show up on the used market that often. I really like the slightly more aggressive cutting you get with the C-Arm compared to other designs.

In the condition you say it is, If it were me, I d just clean it up and start making sawdust! Spend your cash on some good blades. If you really want it to be perfect so you don t have to worry about it, then replace or clean/repack the bearings. It s the mechanical bits that will knock you out of commission, not the cosmetic ones.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Good point! I’ll probably just wire wheel the stand and hit it with some rust killing primer and call it good. I just don’t want the rust to transfer to a perfect saw or the stand to disintegrate when it is in pretty decent condition over all.

Not sure why I didn’t mention it, but the upper blade holder has a cam system to tension the blade and that looks warped to me (just bend over slightly) should I put a blade in when I get one and see if it is a problem, or spend the $30 for a new clip? I can’t find hardly and videos that show anything useful on the saw at all much less on the top blade tension system lol otherwise I’d just try to find the answer there.

I might replace the bearings, that is probably a good call just to be safe. They are old, even if they only saw (lol) a few cuts which is what the other parts of the saw look like.

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#13 posted 11-11-2020 05:59 PM

So, I got the upper blade clamp realigned (it had gotten put together wrong, or something so that the blade clamp was at an angle and up on a little nub of metal see photos).
Note the two little prongs on the left of the blade clamp. They are elevated slightly, and the clamp had been tightened down so that it was on one of those elevated pegs

I also put the table back on (I just derusted and oiled the bare metal spots, no painting).

The last step I will do is to sand or wire wheel the stand to get rid of the rust, and then paint it, probably with Rustoleum.

I know that is more than absolutely needed, but I like my tools to start off in the best possible condition and then not need to be repaired during a project (or at least not as early).

The first two photos are the blade clamp alignment issue before and after, and the third is the saw after I had it back together.

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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pontic

811 posts in 1574 days


#14 posted 11-13-2020 09:48 AM

I suppose my Heagner is out of the question then if the range is 200 dollars. I really don’t think it’s worth what I paid for it anyway.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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Sanderguy777

279 posts in 2167 days


#15 posted 11-19-2020 01:44 AM

So. I just got the table insert and detent clip so that I could run the saw.

I plugged it in, flipped the switch, and nothing happened. (I ran it at the guy’s house, so I knew it functioned). Then after a couple silent seconds, it started up.

I checked that it was securely plugged in, pulled out the switch and saw that it had continuity (not sure if there is a certain reading it needs). I dont know if the AC to DC converter (inverter?) has an issue, or if there is a capacitor that is going bad (it isnt dead yet though, since it DOES eventually run on its own).

Any ideas?

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

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