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Minwax polyshade on maple

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Forum topic by Airspeed posted 10-30-2020 11:32 PM 565 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Airspeed

465 posts in 2814 days


10-30-2020 11:32 PM

I’m building a custom fishing pole display for a customer, originally she wanted it just clear coated so I used some maple, now she wants it stained and I’ve never had any luck staining maple, thinking of trying Minwax poly shade thinking it will color evenly without a blotchy finish. Have any of you tried this stuff? She wants it fairly dark.

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/


30 replies so far

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johnstoneb

3161 posts in 3084 days


#1 posted 10-30-2020 11:52 PM

I used minwax poly shade once. Never again. It never dried. I will never use it again. I am not a fan of other minwax finishes I have used them. I have used them had application problems sometimes not always happy with the finish quality.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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corelz125

1724 posts in 1887 days


#2 posted 10-30-2020 11:54 PM

Stay far away from that stuff it’s horrible. I used it once because that was the only thing in the store for the color I needed after I was done I threw the rest in the garbage.

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CWWoodworking

1130 posts in 1090 days


#3 posted 10-30-2020 11:59 PM

To get even really dark maple, you might try a dye stain. Transtint has a black. Read up on how to use dye stains. Different than wipe on, wipe off.

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AlaskaGuy

6199 posts in 3220 days


#4 posted 10-31-2020 12:24 AM

Wood Magazine gives polyshades 2 out of 5. I have used it and giving it 2 points is generous.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/review/finishes/stain/minwax-polyshades-stain-and-finish

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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sansoo22

1282 posts in 566 days


#5 posted 10-31-2020 12:47 AM



Wood Magazine gives polyshades 2 out of 5. I have used it and giving it 2 points is generous.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/review/finishes/stain/minwax-polyshades-stain-and-finish

- AlaskaGuy

The 2 points is a Basketball reference for the 2 points you get for tossing it in the trash.

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CaptainKlutz

3825 posts in 2406 days


#6 posted 10-31-2020 01:39 AM

Death to Polyshades! NEGATIVE 5 STARS!

What dark color, black, brown, blue, red, etc?

Am big fan of Mohawk Ultra Pentrating Dye Stains to color wood:
https://www.mohawk-finishing.com/products/wood-staining-finishing/stains-glazes-colorants/ultra-penetrating-ngr-stain/

Woodcraft recently stopped carrying the Behlen’s dye stain (which is same stuff, from same factory) and now carries the Mohawk brand: https://www.woodcraft.com/categories/stains?brand%5B%5D=Mohawk

This are non-grain raising dye stain using acetone/alcohol solvents. Easy to adjust color with clean rag using solvent blend only. With low RH in Arizona, have to add some glycol as retarder or more solvent. Can lighten color with solvent to make it easier to sneak up final color. Works best as spray and rub down method, or wipe on stain to reduce effects of grain figure blotch with need for blotch control. Like all stains, flooding the surface on figured woods can create blotching.

my second choice is similar dye stain using Transtint liquid colors and 50/50 blend of alcohol/acetone.

If you think it will blotch, be safe: brush on light coating of 1lb cut of blonde shellac, and sand it smooth. 2 coats on end grain you don’t want to be dark.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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pottz

12215 posts in 1896 days


#7 posted 10-31-2020 03:25 AM

i agree with all stay away from minwax polyshades products,look at general finishes or mohawk products if you want quality.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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SMP

2852 posts in 817 days


#8 posted 10-31-2020 03:37 AM

I tried it once, tried on a test piece, 1, 2, and 3 coats. Tossed it in the trash. And I’m not even one of the Minwax haters. I often use their Antique Oil Finish.

I also would do dye on maple.

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Rich

6141 posts in 1501 days


#9 posted 10-31-2020 03:55 AM


Death to Polyshades! NEGATIVE 5 STARS!

If you think it will blotch, be safe: brush on light coating of 1lb cut of blonde shellac, and sand it smooth. 2 coats on end grain you don t want to be dark.

- CaptainKlutz

LOL, yeah. It’s time to burn Polyshades at the stake.

The bottom line is that maple WILL blotch. +1 for the shellac method. Another is a simple glue sizing. You can make it yourself for pennies using Elmers or any other white glue mixed around 1:6 with water. Brush it on liberally, wipe off any puddles and let it dry. It will raise the grain, so knock that off with some 320 grit. Be sure to do a test board, because one application of the sizing might not be enough, and you don’t want to find that out on the final product.

I had a local contractor pay me almost $1000 for some maple raised panel doors. I gave him some spare pieces and detailed directions on blotch control (I even threw in a jar of the glue sizing), test boards and the rest. He called me a week later to make a new set. When I saw the results he brought to the shop from his attempt a staining, it was horrid. But hey, more money for me. Still it was sad to see the doors ruined.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodbutcherbynight

6587 posts in 3320 days


#10 posted 10-31-2020 04:08 AM

If all the above comments were not enough to sway your decision let me be blunt. Why not just use motor oil? You would get better results and it’s cheaper. Use the glue sizing method or the shellac method or try Transtint or Mowhawk. Much better results and a world less frustration.

The 2 points is a Basketball reference for the 2 points you get for tossing it in the trash.

- sansoo22

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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JAAune

1891 posts in 3228 days


#11 posted 10-31-2020 04:19 AM

Polyshades is basically a toner but a slow-drying polyurethane is a difficult base to work with for a toner. Toners are best applied in very thin, even coats to control the amount of color. Fast drying finishes like shellac or lacquer are better for toners since multiple coats can be applied in a short period.

It’s also very difficult to apply toners without a spray gun. I’ve done it by wiping on very thin coats but the results are not as good as a sprayed toner.

Maple will take a dark stain. The easiest way to do so is to spray a dye stain to get close. When that is dry, spray an oil-based wiping stain to complete the color. It takes practice to get it right so testing on sample boards is a necessity.

-- See my work at http://altaredesign.com

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paulLumberJock

27 posts in 110 days


#12 posted 10-31-2020 05:18 AM

I have made a bunch of stuff in maple.
The finish that looks best in my opinion is, clear shellac then a gel stain then poly.
The thing is, the gel stain will not give it a lot of color, at least not the kind I used. It
will slightly darken it, but if you have some maple that’s really white, it doesn’t do much at all.
However, if it’s already got poly on it, you can put some gel stain over the poly, (sand the poly first, then
gel stain, then another coat of poly).. that will add some color. I have done it to try to even out some pieces. not ideal, but probably better than polyshades.

If you have not put poly on yet and she wants it darkened, you probably need an oil based stain, but yea, unlike
a gel stain, it might blotch, but I used some really red oil based stain once on maple (darker than I thought it would be).. It was pretty even color, but a bit too dark for me.

Good luck on you project, I am not a finishing expert, just a hobbyist.

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Rich

6141 posts in 1501 days


#13 posted 10-31-2020 05:25 AM


If all the above comments were not enough to sway your decision let me be blunt. Why not just use motor oil?

- woodbutcherbynight

30 weight? Or should I use something like 5W-40 to account for temperature swings?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodbutcherbynight

6587 posts in 3320 days


#14 posted 10-31-2020 05:29 AM


If all the above comments were not enough to sway your decision let me be blunt. Why not just use motor oil?

- woodbutcherbynight

30 weight? Or should I use something like 5W-40 to account for temperature swings?

- Rich

I recommend high mileage well burnt up diesel oil. For that deep rich color.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6199 posts in 3220 days


#15 posted 10-31-2020 05:36 AM


If all the above comments were not enough to sway your decision let me be blunt. Why not just use motor oil?

- woodbutcherbynight

30 weight? Or should I use something like 5W-40 to account for temperature swings?

- Rich


5w-20 would be plenty good around here.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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