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How to insulate a garage that has no channels to hold foam panels

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Forum topic by Lindell Drake posted 10-30-2020 04:07 AM 702 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lindell Drake

88 posts in 1033 days


10-30-2020 04:07 AM

The title pretty much says it all. I have a double pane garage door and there is really nothing to attach foam panels to. I have been searching for the last couple of hours for ideas but I am coming up blank for the most part. There was a post on LJ’s about glueing in the panels but I was not sure if that was the best idea. Something else I considered
was to drill a hole in each panel and use expanding foam. Or if there is any other options.

Thank you for anything you can suggest.


14 replies so far

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6592 posts in 3321 days


#1 posted 10-30-2020 04:50 AM

Can you post a picture of the inside of the doors? Give me a visual to work with, ya never know what sort of solution I might think up on my way to work one day.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Lindell Drake

88 posts in 1033 days


#2 posted 10-30-2020 04:55 AM


Can you post a picture of the inside of the doors? Give me a visual to work with, ya never know what sort of solution I might think up on my way to work one day.

- woodbutcherbynight

Thank you for the look.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6628 posts in 1487 days


#3 posted 10-30-2020 04:57 AM

I don’t have an idea where they got them, but there are insulating blankets for lack of a better description, not the foam panels. These blankets (I’ve seen R 8 and R 12) are screwed onto the inside panel of the door, and have a large washer they are screwed through to hold the insulation from moving. I would ask at places where the doors are sold. I’ve seen a fair number of them back in the past. Then most doors didn’t have ribs for the panels they use today.

The most inventive I have seen is a guy who screwed chicken wire to the inside of the door. He bunched it up so it made a frame that was a few inches deep. Then he sprayed the chicken wire with a tank of closed cell foam. Foam dries he trimmed it up with a bread knife, actually looked as good as the foam panels, and I’ve no doubt his R value was higher, it was thicker than the usual suspects.

I haven’t seen him for a few years, but last time I did it was doing fine, and he claimed the garage was much warmer.

Overall it’s a cost vs. efficiency thing though, and getting a real insulated door may always be the best option. We had uninsulated doors we put on a house we built, it was as cold as the Yukon out there in the Winter. Finally looked into replacement doors, went with some Clopay seconds, ended up being 250 a door, and it was toasty out there after that.

-- Think safe, be safe

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6592 posts in 3321 days


#4 posted 10-30-2020 05:08 AM

No problem. I am thinking flexible ceiling panels, but admit nothing comes to mind yet on how to attach them. The flexibility of the panel would allow you to overlap the breaks in each panel. Gets rid of draft and is pliable enough to take the abuse of opening and closing the door. They are also lightweight so not adding alot to the door.

Few years back I did a door like that for a photographer. His purpose was a solid background that didn’t look like a garage door. I screwed snap bottoms into the doorframe and sewed up a large curtain with snap tops. Worked our way from top to bottom and the snaps held well. You could even open the door if needed. Not to sure about the weight for adding say fleece backing but can’t be that bad. Might test your sewing skills though.

As a disclaimer I do not suggest you inform spouse you are a) borrowing her sewing machine, or b ) informing her she has a large curtain with a fleece backing to make by Sunday evening.

ROFL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

10507 posts in 3205 days


#5 posted 10-30-2020 05:34 AM

Although I have an insulated door on my shop, it’s 8×16 and I’m in MN, and rarely use it no matter the season anyway. Partially for sound insulation, partially to help cut echo inside, partially for wind/draft stop, and partially for heat/cold insulation, I bought 3 oversized moving blankets from Northern Tool, and hung them in front of the garage door using tarp clips and some screw in hooks into the door header. Been there about 3 years now, and haven’t come down yet, intentionally or unintentionally. Not a huge R value, but stops air exchange, which helps a lot too, and accomplishes what I wanted to with it. Also did the same thing on walls in a basement bedroom that had no insulation because of a paused remodel all last winter

I believe this is what therealSteveN was referring to
https://www.owenscorning.com/en-us/insulation/products/garage-door-insulation-kit

One thing to keep in mind though, anything you attach to the garage door that will stay attached when it opens and closes might require an adjustment to the door assist springs if you have a garage door opener, to prevent wearing it out faster. I do a lot of things myself, and that wouldn’t be one of them, lots of stored energy in those suckers

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6628 posts in 1487 days


#6 posted 10-30-2020 05:51 AM


As a disclaimer I do not suggest you inform spouse you are a) borrowing her sewing machine, or b ) informing her she has a large curtain with a fleece backing to make by Sunday evening.

ROFL

- woodbutcherbynight

You gotta love a place you come talk about woodworking, and can also get marital advice along the way. :-)

-- Think safe, be safe

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6204 posts in 3222 days


#7 posted 10-30-2020 05:59 AM

https://youtu.be/rD9hhZNyNC4

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View 4wood's profile

4wood

66 posts in 866 days


#8 posted 10-30-2020 02:19 PM

VELCRO tape may work very well. It is used a lot to hold upholstered panels to walls. My local Ace Hardware sells it by the foot.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1809 posts in 1501 days


#9 posted 10-30-2020 02:42 PM

Construction adhesive.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4121 posts in 2135 days


#10 posted 10-30-2020 10:04 PM

The insulated blanket idea sounds interesting. My door (made from 5 horizontal segments) has insulated panels, but there is always the joint between the panels where they pivot, prime for air leaks. The blanket would still allow the door to flex as it is opened and would certainly help with the air leaks.

For using ridged foam panels, my first thought followed MadMark’s, a few blobs of construction adhesive. They make a formula just for rigid foam application.

View Lindell Drake's profile

Lindell Drake

88 posts in 1033 days


#11 posted 10-30-2020 10:42 PM

Thank you everyone for your advice. Will post pics when I figure out what I am doing

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

515 posts in 2833 days


#12 posted 10-30-2020 10:54 PM

Construction adhesive on pins then foam then pin cap retainers, used in the north we have basements.

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Fresch

515 posts in 2833 days


#13 posted 10-30-2020 10:55 PM

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bigJohninvegas

821 posts in 2374 days


#14 posted 10-31-2020 12:27 AM

I agree with using construction adhesive. My dad bought one of those all metal DIY buildings. And we used the adhesive to glue styrofoam sheets everywhere. worked very well. And is very permanent.
You will have to adjust the tension spring. It is amazing how heavy the door is. And how well balanced it is.
It takes very little added weight and you may have to have heavier springs installed.

-- John

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