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Highland Woodworking Resaw Blade - is it the best?

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Forum topic by Bstrom posted 10-29-2020 04:55 PM 751 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bstrom

205 posts in 87 days


10-29-2020 04:55 PM

After scoring a 1972 Rockwell/Delta 14” bandsaw for just $100 this past weekend, I decided to treat it to a new resaw blade. Reviews suggest the Highland Wood Slicer would be a wise choice. Ordered yesterday. Came in today. Can’t fault the customer service. Will mount the new blade and see if it is an improvement and report my findings with some comparative photos.

-- Bstrom


17 replies so far

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PBWilson1970

142 posts in 307 days


#1 posted 10-29-2020 05:20 PM

Best is tricky to answer accurately for different people, but I’ve used several of that blade for some very fine resawing and it does leave a very nice finish and has a thin kerf. A bit on the expensive side, but not terrible.

Still, it dulls like other blades and then starts to wander which doesn’t do well with tall resawing jobs.

I’d say that it would be a great choice for resawing where you need to preserve the most stock as you can and if you want a fine surface off the saw. If you’re looking to do a ton of resawing or use some exotics, a carbide blade might be a better investment.

If you’re willing to replace it when it shown signs of dulling, you’ll be very happy with it.

For the work I do now, which is working with log sections for turning with bark and wet wood, I like a blade with a wider set and use a Timberwolf that eats up the logs.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

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Rich

6145 posts in 1503 days


#2 posted 10-29-2020 05:22 PM

It’s easily the top non-carbide-tipped blade out there based on my experience. The best by far is the Laguna ReSaw King carbide blade. While the $150 price tag might give you sticker shock, the fact that it can be resharpened four times at around $40 a pop makes it far more economical than it might appear at first glance. You’re essentially getting five blades for $310. Also, keep an eye on eBay. Laguna sells them there and I’ve paid as little as $125 with free shipping. Gotta watch for the deals though.

When you’re spending good money for quality blades, a worthwhile investment is a spliciing jig and some silver solder for those breaks that always seem to happen at the worst time. Lee Valley sells a kit for $34.50, which is enough to get you free shipping. They also sell extra silver solder and flux, although if you have a local jeweler supply dealer you can get it there too.

Be careful not to over-tension the blade to reduce breakage. They tend to start in the gullet between the teeth, and if you see the blade thrusting forward as it’s running, that’s a sign it’s starting to fail.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Bstrom

205 posts in 87 days


#3 posted 10-29-2020 05:39 PM



It s easily the top non-carbide-tipped blade out there based on my experience. The best by far is the Laguna ReSaw King carbide blade. While the $150 price tag might give you sticker shock, the fact that it can be resharpened four times at around $40 a pop makes it far more economical than it might appear at first glance. You re essentially getting five blades for $310. Also, keep an eye on eBay. Laguna sells them there and I ve paid as little as $125 with free shipping. Gotta watch for the deals though.

When you re spending good money for quality blades, a worthwhile investment is a spliciing jig and some silver solder for those breaks that always seem to happen at the worst time. Lee Valley sells a kit for $34.50, which is enough to get you free shipping. They also sell extra silver solder and flux, although if you have a local jeweler supply dealer you can get it there too.

Be careful not to over-tension the blade to reduce breakage. They tend to start in the gullet between the teeth, and if you see the blade thrusting forward as it s running, that s a sign it s starting to fail.

- Rich


Appreciate all the comments and warnings – you are on the money for this blade as a top value, Rick – until it dulls, of course. Just got done mounting it and it cuts like a hot knife through butter in some Ash I tested it with. Thankfully, my newly acquired saw is in excellent shape and adjusts out to being perfectly square with all the guide properly set against the blade. The saw has a tension scale on the back side which I used to tension this blade and it behaves perfectly. Best tool buy ever…

-- Bstrom

View Robert's profile

Robert

4142 posts in 2394 days


#4 posted 10-29-2020 06:08 PM

I’ve used them for years I never was too impressed with longevity.

I recently got a blade from Infinity and my initial impression is it’s a better blade.

To qualify it’s 3/4” and I’m running it on a 18” 3HP bandsaw.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Bstrom

205 posts in 87 days


#5 posted 10-29-2020 06:17 PM

I hear you – don’t expect this blade to last forever but it will save me a lot of time and effort in eliminating additional planing and provide faster sanding sessions – that’s worth money to me, even as a hobbyist. Looks like you’re cutting much wider stock which is gonna make a difference.

-- Bstrom

View John Jardin's profile

John Jardin

86 posts in 554 days


#6 posted 10-29-2020 09:49 PM

+1 to Rich!
These Wood Slicer blades from Highland Hardware are outstanding.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10785 posts in 4561 days


#7 posted 10-29-2020 10:08 PM

It’s a great blade. My experience was it didn’t stay sharp long.

A lot of people may not know you can send standard steel resaw blades out for sharpening. Not with this one. The variable pitch doesn’t work on the machines sharpening shops use.

It would be a great blade for cutting veneer or guitar plates from precious woods but for everyday resawing other blades may offer more bang for the buck.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4121 posts in 2136 days


#8 posted 10-29-2020 10:33 PM

I went through three of these Highlander blade (16” 3.5 HP) and they do cut superbly when fresh. With the last one, I took as much care as possible to avoid re-sawing hard woods since that was what I thought killed the first two in short order. Basically a fine blade with smooth cuts and short life.
I’m currently on the Laguna RK (carbide) and I feed it everything. So far, so good!

View Jimarco's profile

Jimarco

20 posts in 2021 days


#9 posted 10-29-2020 11:08 PM



It s easily the top non-carbide-tipped blade out there based on my experience. The best by far is the Laguna ReSaw King carbide blade. While the $150 price tag might give you sticker shock, the fact that it can be resharpened four times at around $40 a pop makes it far more economical than it might appear at first glance. You re essentially getting five blades for $310. Also, keep an eye on eBay. Laguna sells them there and I ve paid as little as $125 with free shipping. Gotta watch for the deals though.

When you re spending good money for quality blades, a worthwhile investment is a spliciing jig and some silver solder for those breaks that always seem to happen at the worst time. Lee Valley sells a kit for $34.50, which is enough to get you free shipping. They also sell extra silver solder and flux, although if you have a local jeweler supply dealer you can get it there too.

Be careful not to over-tension the blade to reduce breakage. They tend to start in the gullet between the teeth, and if you see the blade thrusting forward as it s running, that s a sign it s starting to fail.

- Rich

I’m with the others, the wood Slicer is a great blade when sharp but it doesn’t stay sharp very long. Thanks for the tip and insight on the Laguna Blade. When you add in that it can be sharpened it takes away the sticker shock.

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Rich

6145 posts in 1503 days


#10 posted 10-30-2020 04:36 AM

I might point out that steel band saw blades are just that—saw blades. Just as you can sharpen your dovetail or carcass saw, with the right files, the right technique, and lots of patience, you can sharpen one yourself in the shop.

Have I ever done that? Heck no (did I mention the patience part?). But you could.

I find the comments about the Wood Slicer’s short life interesting. I experienced the same thing. Since I was resawing mesquite, which is very gritty due to the environment it grows in, I had assumed it was just that steel blades couldn’t stand up to it. I guess it wasn’t just me.

The blade I keep on my saw for general cutting is the Starrett Advanz. It’s razor sharp, but pricier than the Laguna.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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therealSteveN

6635 posts in 1488 days


#11 posted 10-30-2020 06:16 AM

Completely on the opposite side of the world, I have been having splendid luck with the Starrett’s sold at WoodCraft, they call them Duratech. Really low cost to get in, and I’m finding they last at least as long as The Woodslicer, which I felt came about half dull by my experience. They are frequently on sale at least 10% off, sometimes 15%. I stock up then. I can only rate the Woodslicers I tried, versus the Starrett’s, the welds on the Starrett’s are far superior, and a poor weld is a bad blade.I realize you can dress a bad weld, but why should you have to?

https://www.woodcraft.com/search?q=Starrett+bandsaw+blades&button=search

-- Think safe, be safe

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

2463 posts in 2863 days


#12 posted 10-30-2020 10:00 AM

This is a good discussion. I have the wood slicer, I did not know that my blade is dull. It has not resawed well for some time. It’s time to look into the Laguna.

-- Petey

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

15313 posts in 2052 days


#13 posted 10-30-2020 01:58 PM

Woodslicers are my favorite because they give a really nice finish on my saw. As others have said though, the longevity leaves something to be desired. However, replacing the blade more often is a trade I’m willing to make for the results I get personally. However I don’t resaw all that much so bear that in mind. If I did significantly more resawing, I’d definitely invest in a carbide blade.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Rich's profile

Rich

6145 posts in 1503 days


#14 posted 10-30-2020 02:23 PM

I’m surprised the Timber Wolf hasn’t been mentioned. As far as the Woodcraft lineup goes, it is the “premium” blade versus Starrett. Cuts beautifully, lasted longer than the Wood Slicer, but still didn’t stand up to the woods I cut well enough for my needs.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Bstrom's profile

Bstrom

205 posts in 87 days


#15 posted 10-30-2020 09:27 PM



Woodslicers are my favorite because they give a really nice finish on my saw. As others have said though, the longevity leaves something to be desired. However, replacing the blade more often is a trade I m willing to make for the results I get personally. However I don t resaw all that much so bear that in mind. If I did significantly more resawing, I d definitely invest in a carbide blade.

- HokieKen


I’ve cut one piece of wood and love the cut quality already. No more planing!
As far as blade life goes, I’m in the same boat – if this blade lasts me six months or longer, I’ll buy a new one. Sharpening fees are just less money to spend on new tooling as far as I’m concerned. Not even sure anyone around here sharpens these blades. (I really expect it to last a long while with the infrequent use I intend)

-- Bstrom

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