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Forum topic by risnot posted 10-29-2020 11:38 AM 236 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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risnot

3 posts in 29 days


10-29-2020 11:38 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood finish refinish

First refinishing project – took 5 goes at stripping to get layers of paint (and tape, under the paint!) off a beautiful old dresser. Two little accent drawers looked to be very slightly different colors once stripped and I’d naively hoped that putting a little oil finish on top might even it out… of course, it made the difference even more stark. Any ideas on evening out at this point, or is it just what it is? I really like the natural color of the wood which is why I chose not to stain it.


5 replies so far

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Robert

4134 posts in 2393 days


#1 posted 10-29-2020 12:26 PM

A toner is one product specially designed for this. Available at refinishing sites or Mohawk. If you go this route seal everything with a couple coats of shellac first. Use dewaxed shellac (Zinsser Seal Coat).

A dye stain is another option, but can be tricky to match and is not reversible. That said, sometimes you can dye the whole thing, then go back and selectively re-dye the lighter areas .

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Rich

6142 posts in 1502 days


#2 posted 10-29-2020 04:39 PM

+1 on the toner. Be sure it’s toner and not colored lacquer. Toner will allow you to gradually sneak up on the depth of color you want.

Regarding shellac, that will work, but since toner is lacquer based, I’d go that direction instead. One advantage shellac would provide however is that you can use acetone to remove the toner if you need to, without removing the shellac base.

If you have a Woodcraft store in your area, they sell the Touch Up Solutions brand of toner. I prefer Mohawk products over Touch Up Solutions in general, but I have found their toner to be an excellent product.

And finally, you can make your own toner using lacquer or shellac by tinting it. Do a search for more information on that.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5931 posts in 2300 days


#3 posted 10-29-2020 09:26 PM

If you are talking about the 2 drawers on the front, that just looks like it is showing some sapwood. Keeping it simple may be your best bet. I have had good luck when stripping and refinishing just using Watco Walnut Danish oil to even out light color variations in mid-century walnut tables. Personally, I would embrace the grain differences and let the Watco make it a little less stark.

BTW, whatever approach you decide to take, if the inside of the drawer has the same pattern (i.e.; its not veneer on the front) you may be able to experiment on the inside of the drawer to avoid really making a mess of it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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risnot

3 posts in 29 days


#4 posted 10-31-2020 04:33 AM

Thanks all for the replies! I’d prefer to not use shellac because I really like a more matte finish, something subtle. A friend suggested ending with Renaissance wax.

Would toner/laquer leave a shiny finish?

Edit: forgot to mention, the front isn’t veneer, per se…but it’s like a half inch thick piece of carved out wood glued to the drawer front. It’s been suggested that it’s later replacement – apparently, to the trained eye, the craftsmanship is different, as is the wood grain.

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Rich

6142 posts in 1502 days


#5 posted 10-31-2020 04:54 AM


Thanks all for the replies! I d prefer to not use shellac because I really like a more matte finish, something subtle. A friend suggested ending with Renaissance wax.

Would toner/laquer leave a shiny finish?

- risnot

You can buy lacquer in sheens ranging from gloss to dead flat. Shellac is pretty high sheen but, as I mentioned, might be a good base before you begin toning since the lacquer toner can be removed without affecting the shellac should you be dissatisfied with the result.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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