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any tips on how to carve this texture

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Forum topic by harum posted 10-28-2020 07:09 PM 538 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

410 posts in 2556 days


10-28-2020 07:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

This is a photo from a Bosnian woodworking shop, Zanat Studiolise(?), famous for traditional handmade designs.

Do I understand this correctly that the texture as in the photo can be made with a back bevel gouge? What sweep, if yes?

Would appreciate any tips and comments.
Thank you and Best Wishes,
H.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


14 replies so far

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Rich

6145 posts in 1503 days


#1 posted 10-28-2020 08:10 PM

Yep, that’s how it’s done. No magic there, just pare away. That gouge looks like maybe a 7 sweep, give or take. I doubt it’s critical, just what looks good to you and whatever you might have in your carving tool collection

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

2858 posts in 819 days


#2 posted 10-28-2020 08:35 PM

Kind of looks to me like possibly a couple sizes sweeps? Like for example a beginner set may come with a #3, 5, and 7 gouge. Use the #3 or 5 to make a shallow then use the 7 to make the little scallops. Just a guess.

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Aj2

3495 posts in 2711 days


#3 posted 10-29-2020 02:05 AM

All gouges will leave a cut like that.
The real test is can you get a gouge sharp enough to cut across the grain ??

-- Aj

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Rich

6145 posts in 1503 days


#4 posted 10-29-2020 02:31 AM


All gouges will leave a cut like that.
The real test is can you get a gouge sharp enough to cut across the grain ??

- Aj2

No, not all gouges will make those.cuts. A #1 is flat, and the curve increases as the numbers do. For example, here are #4 profiles:

Here’s a #7:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Aj2

3495 posts in 2711 days


#5 posted 10-29-2020 04:44 AM

I would like to change my answer to all no 7 gouges will make a texture similar to that.
If the craftsman can sharpen his or her tool.
I offer this example that I introduced to the end grain of a kitchen cart made from hickory.

Thanks Rich :)
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Rich

6145 posts in 1503 days


#6 posted 10-29-2020 04:57 AM


I would like to change my answer to all no 7 gouges will make a texture similar to that.
If the craftsman can sharpen his or her tool.

- Aj2

Change made, Aj. And yeah, keep ‘em sharp.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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harum

410 posts in 2556 days


#7 posted 10-29-2020 05:53 AM

Rich, SMP, Aj, Thank you for all the tips! Will start with No. 7 then. Yes, getting and keeping the gouge sharp enough to use it without a mallet is something to learn. The guy in the video doesn’t seem to be rotating the board or using mallet, creates scallops in one motion. Either his gouge is super-sharp, or the wood is relatively soft.

Nice cart Aj! What’s the finish?

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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John Smith

2776 posts in 1076 days


#8 posted 10-29-2020 12:29 PM

there is a member here that used this technique recently in a fireplace mantle for his home. although he used an assortment of hand and power tools, it still looks good.
and his completed project: https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/311406
what are you going to carve for your project ??

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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harum

410 posts in 2556 days


#9 posted 10-29-2020 01:26 PM

Thank you, John! Interesting thread. I want to give some texture to plain and boring cabinet doors.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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John Smith

2776 posts in 1076 days


#10 posted 10-29-2020 01:28 PM


I offer this example that I introduced to the end grain of a kitchen cart made from hickory.

- Aj2

AJ – did you do anything to the endgrain of the table? any carving ?
I’m trying to understand your post and the No. 7 gouges.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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harum

410 posts in 2556 days


#11 posted 10-29-2020 02:29 PM

On the other hand, there’s also a ball gouge attachment to an angle grinder, which YouTube has just suggested. Probably, doesn’t leave as smooth a surface as a sharp gouge.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5943 posts in 2301 days


#12 posted 10-29-2020 02:54 PM

I have a ball gouge for the angle grinder and it can leave a similar surface but it is more difficult to control so you may not get the exact same effect as the picture. I find it more useful for hollowing or scooping out a depression than for surfacing.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1180 posts in 817 days


#13 posted 10-29-2020 11:47 PM

Yes, it is a random pattern of gouge “scoops” – probably #7

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Phil32

1180 posts in 817 days


#14 posted 11-02-2020 06:25 PM

It should also be noted that in the original photo the scoops are being made cross-grain with a very sharp gouge. The cut is a very small shaving. There are many woods that would not work well for this, even with a sharp tool.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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