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Forum topic by MrRon posted 10-28-2020 01:53 AM 409 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5954 posts in 4155 days


10-28-2020 01:53 AM

My woodworking these days is mostly making scale models of trains and accessories like bridges, stations, etc. Most model makers I see use hobby adhesives made for that purpose. Since models don’t need a lot of strength in use, I have been using Loctite professional instant glue. It sets up in seconds and doesn’t require clamping. I use many different materials in my models and find the Loctite adhesive works for all materials. The bond is very strong. I have been able to complete glue-ups in a fraction of the time needed when using conventional adhesives and clamping. One has to be careful where you put your fingers of they may become a permanent part of the model. Imagine the time it takes to build a wood trestle using “slow” glues like Titebond. For soldering on metals, a resistance soldering unit makes soldering small parts easy. It controls the heat easily preventing close pre-soldered joints from melting while adding new pieces.


8 replies so far

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SMP

2852 posts in 817 days


#1 posted 10-28-2020 03:51 AM

I used to make tons of RC airplanes. I always had thin, medium, and thick CA, and then the spray CA accelerant like Zip-kicker. It makes CA set instantly when you spray it. That was what pretty much all the airplane modelers used.

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crowie

4047 posts in 2862 days


#2 posted 10-28-2020 07:34 AM

The thing I’ve found with super glues is it stains the timber if you aren’t extremely careful with its placement & quantity.

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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GR8HUNTER

8030 posts in 1624 days


#3 posted 10-28-2020 02:08 PM

i use medium 2P-10 but only 1 drop hardly ever use accelerant leaves like a foam behind sometimes :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

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OnhillWW

270 posts in 2144 days


#4 posted 10-28-2020 02:56 PM

+1 on the RC Plane building. Got to have all three CA formulations and the add on tips as well as they really help to control application. CA is great stuff as long as you can stand the fumes. I was fine for years, 4-5 plane builds each winter, thats a lot of gluing. Over time I found I would get a runny nose and stuffed up around it. I found placing a fanoff to my rear and side helped. I rarely used accelerant as I really dislike the smell and it tends to linger. I now still keep the three grades in stock, in the refrigerator because it takes longer to use up now that I’m no longer building RC planes. My years of aeroplane building taught me a lot about adhesives (CA, Epoxy and fiber glassing) and the importance of tight fitting joints – it all translates into my woodworking today. CA is a great tool that many woodworkers do not have much experienced with.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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Bill_Steele

733 posts in 2643 days


#5 posted 10-28-2020 03:06 PM

I recently had to cut some small parts for a project to a precise length—fitting them in uneven openings – so I had to sneak up on the fit.

I found it to be awkward because of how short/small the final parts needed to be (1”-1.5” in length). I ended up just cutting the small parts from a longer piece of stock and using a sharp chisel and sandpaper to make final fit adjustments.

I’m wondering if you have any jigs that help you hold small parts and/or help you make repetitive cuts on small parts safely? I assume model making involves a lot of small parts.

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OnhillWW

270 posts in 2144 days


#6 posted 10-28-2020 06:59 PM


had to sneak up on the fit….......I m wondering if you have any jigs that help you hold small parts and/or help you make repetitive cuts on small parts safely? I assume model making involves a lot of small parts.

- Bill_Steele


I am sure that the OP will share his experience. You are correct in that it involves many parts and exacting fits. The majority of the wood was balsa, basswood, spruce and thin plywood. Sneaking up on a fit was the rule and not hard to do with these softer woods and small dimensions. Cut a hair oversize and shave it to fit tight with abrasives. I had three T-bars loaded with three grits at arms length at all times along with the ubiquitous 1” x 30” belt sander to do the heavy lifting. Precision work takes time.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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SMP

2852 posts in 817 days


#7 posted 10-28-2020 07:52 PM

The zona razor saw and mini miter box are pretty good for cuts on small parts. If the wood is soft enough I just use a support block and a sharp wide paring chisel to sneak up on it.

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MrRon

5954 posts in 4155 days


#8 posted 10-31-2020 02:46 AM

Building models whether they be trains, ships or planes takes much finesse and a steady hand. For very tiny parts, wood doesn’t behave, unless it’s a very dense exotic wood. For those tiny parts, I make them in metal. Model making utilizes an abundance of ingenuity and adaptability. Many times I can adapt some common household items into a model. Those aluminum beer and soda cans are a treasure pot. Even common aluminum foil finds a use in model making. I work in thousands of an inch; I have the tools for precise measurements and while it may seem overkill to others, I find it easy to do. Having done this for 70+ years, to me it is not a problem. Given the properties of wood (expansion, twisting, warping, etc) using metals makes for precise miniature parts. At the present time, I am building a new model railroad. Rather than buying kits or ready-to-run trains, I build most of what I need. Going back 60 years, a model locomotive in HO scale could be bought for less than $30 with some as low as $10. Today there is sticker shock when I see some locomotives going for $1000 and more. That same loco that cost $30 is now selling for $200 and up. Obviously I can’t afford those prices, so because I can make my own, I do. People today in this fast moving world may not have the time to devote to a hobby. Retirement has it’s pluses. The expense involved in a hobby or for woodworking in general may not permit people from entering this most satisfying pursuit. Remember when you could buy a Stanley 5-1/2 for a few dollars. Check how much you have to pay today for a new one, or even a used one. Any way, this covid virus has gotten a lot of people thinking about things to do during their quarantine and this may be a good time to think about taking up a hobby. It doesn’t require one to wear a face mask or mingle in crowds. It can be done in the safety of your own home. Apartment dwellers in particular would benefit in having a hobby. But hobbies require an inspiration before one can act. My inspiration comes from watching you tube videos. I will come across a video while browsing and that can be the inspiration I need to pursue it further. Hearing a piece of music can be enough to want to take up an instrument. As the saying goes; “an idle mind is the devil’s workshop”. A hobby is the best way for one to keep out of trouble. It doesn’t matter what the hobby is. The idea is to keep the mind occupied in a fulfilling way. A hobby can bring meaning to life. I’ve had people say ;a hobby is a waste of time when you could be making money. Those money makers are either in the grave or looking at a life of no meaning. Hobbies are great for solitary people, but can also be shared with others with similar interests.
Sorry for the somewhat OT.

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