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Any feedback on Dustopper High Efficiency Dust Separator sold by Home Depot?

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 10-25-2020 02:29 PM 1050 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

410 posts in 963 days


10-25-2020 02:29 PM

I need to cut a small stretch of concrete in my basement, the 7” to the left in the below picture (installing a sink drain there) and I was looking for a circular saw dust collector attachement when I came across the below Dust separator, it seems to have good reviews
Anybody hear tried this one ?

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/dustopper-high-efficiency-dust-separator-12-inch-dia-with-2-12-inch-x-36-inch-hose/1001536667


17 replies so far

View Rich1955's profile

Rich1955

169 posts in 302 days


#1 posted 10-25-2020 02:39 PM

I’ve seen a review on this product and it showed a small amount of dust and chips gets to the vac. I have the Dust Deputy on my shop vac and it’s amazing that almost nothing get into the vac.

-- Rich

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EarlS

4073 posts in 3259 days


#2 posted 10-25-2020 02:48 PM

If you have a Menards (does Lowes have SDD?), check and see if they have the Super Dust Deputy cyclone in stock. It is a cyclone so it will do a better job of knocking out the dust than the dust topper and it is about the same price. The dust topper will get the big stuff, but the finer stuff will still pass through. Basically, there is a vortex in the bucket so anything in there will continue to get stirred up and get carried into the shop vac. With the cyclone, the material winds up in the bucket below the cyclone and there is less chance if it getting carried back out. All in all, the cyclone is a better solution.

Alternatively, build your own with a couple of fittings and a lid and save $60.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2134 posts in 3704 days


#3 posted 10-25-2020 03:19 PM

For concrete dust containing silica, don’t take a chance. Get a gasoline or air powered saw, and wet saw it. You will not catch all the dust by sticking a vac hose near the blade. You can do what you want at home, but the OSHA standards on silica and concrete dust are very strict, and with good reason. The special attachments and HEPA vac system need for me to drill a single 1/4” hole on the job are quite the setup. Be safe.

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siemensgeek

49 posts in 119 days


#4 posted 10-25-2020 04:17 PM

I agree with ibewjon, be careful. I have a Home Depot dust seperator and it works well for sawdust and shavings but concrete dust is a while different animal.

I built a roll around base for mine. I wanted an easy way to remove the dust collection bucket for dumping so I bolted one bucket to the platform and set the dust collection bucket in it.

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2134 posts in 3704 days


#5 posted 10-25-2020 04:43 PM

Is that a water filtered setup? I have one made for drywall sanding that filters the air through a water bath in the bucket. Without water or a HEPA filter, you will be spreading airborne silica through your house. Wet sawing is best.

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MiniMe

410 posts in 963 days


#6 posted 10-25-2020 04:44 PM



For concrete dust containing silica, don t take a chance. Get a gasoline or air powered saw, and wet saw it. You will not catch all the dust by sticking a vac hose near the blade. You can do what you want at home, but the OSHA standards on silica and concrete dust are very strict, and with good reason. The special attachments and HEPA vac system need for me to drill a single 1/4” hole on the job are quite the setup. Be safe.

- ibewjon


oh I had no plans to use this for concrete, I just chipped away little by little using a hammer .that worked great

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ibewjon

2134 posts in 3704 days


#7 posted 10-25-2020 04:49 PM

Ok. The original post talked about sawing concrete and the search for a dust collector for that project.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

410 posts in 963 days


#8 posted 10-26-2020 04:04 AM

my bad if Was not very clear
`` I was looking for a circular saw dust collector attachement when I came across the below Dust separator, it seems to have good reviews``

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

6141 posts in 1501 days


#9 posted 10-26-2020 04:49 AM

As mentioned above, the Oneida Dust Deputy is the standard. At around $100, it’s not significantly more expensive than the Home Depot version. You can also buy just the cyclone for less than the HD product. You’ll still need the Homer bucket and lid and spend some time constructing it, but it’s not rocket science.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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ibewjon

2134 posts in 3704 days


#10 posted 10-26-2020 12:37 PM

I think my dust deputy was $69. And with a taller cyclone, it is a much better separater.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3558 posts in 4349 days


#11 posted 10-26-2020 01:46 PM

I had to cut a 3” x 2’ trench in the concrete floor of our bathroom to extend a tub drainpipe to a corner shower. I used a concrete blade in a circular saw. The setup you show might work (or not) but it’s not necessary. Instead buy a decent respirator, you might use it again so it’s not a waste and not that expensive. Close the door, or even shroud yourself in a plastic curtain. The saw will make a huge amount of dust. My bathroom was a fog. With a strong light I could barely see the floor after awhile. Oh, I also used a pair of those pool goggles. You know the little ones that look like beady eyes with a strap. They seal the area around your eyes well. I got the job done, exited quickly and left the room all day for the dust to settle then cleaned it up.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1282 posts in 566 days


#12 posted 10-26-2020 02:36 PM

I have used both the Oneida Dust Deputy and the Dustopper. The Dustopper was needed because of its lower profile. Before I had a dust collector I had a small shop vac and the Dustopper under my miter saw stand. The Dust Deputy is still in service today because it just performs better. I think the Dustopper is a great product if you are limited on space but if you just need a general cyclone shop vac cart I would go with the Dust Deputy. Like Rich mentioned its pretty much the go to standard for that sort of thing.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

410 posts in 963 days


#13 posted 10-26-2020 06:53 PM

That was madness!
Since I already have an opening in the floor I started removing dirt from under the floor and then chipped away little by little using an average hammer. It was exactly what I needed. I also have a chisel so I did not need the saw, thanks God, it wuld have been a nightmare,
I did try what you did and that triggered the fire and gas sensor in the basment. And that was for a 1”-2” cut to test.


I had to cut a 3” x 2 trench in the concrete floor of our bathroom to extend a tub drainpipe to a corner shower. I used a concrete blade in a circular saw. The setup you show might work (or not) but it s not necessary. Instead buy a decent respirator, you might use it again so it s not a waste and not that expensive. Close the door, or even shroud yourself in a plastic curtain. The saw will make a huge amount of dust. My bathroom was a fog. With a strong light I could barely see the floor after awhile. Oh, I also used a pair of those pool goggles. You know the little ones that look like beady eyes with a strap. They seal the area around your eyes well. I got the job done, exited quickly and left the room all day for the dust to settle then cleaned it up.

- Craftsman on the lake


View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10781 posts in 4559 days


#14 posted 10-26-2020 09:21 PM

Looks like a Thien baffle. People have been making their own for years. It’s maybe not quite as efficient as a cyclone, but it does a fine job compared to the more common lids without the baffle.

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

412 posts in 4658 days


#15 posted 10-27-2020 01:30 PM

If the concrete/drain work had NOTHING to do with the topic, why post the picture and the plans for the project and confuse the hell out of everybody?

-- NorthWoodsMan

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