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Forum topic by MichaelTT posted 10-25-2020 02:18 AM 590 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MichaelTT

55 posts in 1423 days


10-25-2020 02:18 AM

I have this little table, comes from my great grandmother.
The top has some stains on it, water I believe…
The wood is mahogany veneer, I think.

What would be the best way to restore this ?
Light sanding with high grit, 600 or more, and the re-finish with what ?

Suggestions are much appreciated !


7 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1460 posts in 2440 days


#1 posted 10-25-2020 03:11 AM

It looks like a nicely made piece. Before you do anything, I recommend you do some research that might include an appraiser. If it has any antique value, anything you do to it could affect the value, including refinishing. If you determine that refinishing is the way to go, I would do the minimum you can to address the scuffs and stabilize any damage to the veneer. Try to find out what the existing finish is and stay with it for any repair. Repair and stabilization is the key. Don’t attempt to make it like new. To get philosophical, It is trying to tell you it’s life story. Don’t hide it.

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wood2woodknot

111 posts in 3311 days


#2 posted 10-25-2020 03:45 AM

What kind of water stains? Like a white ring from a glass? Or something deeper?

If its more of a surface ring from a glass, I would take a tiny bit of mayonnaise on the tip of your finger and rub it into a small spot and see if it disappears. Buff it out with a soft cloth. Its an old remedy. If it disappears, I would try increasing the area covered – bit by bit.

If its severe water damage that goes deep and affects the wood structure, leave it like bilyo suggests.

-- ajh

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SMP

5072 posts in 1243 days


#3 posted 10-25-2020 04:16 AM

That is gorgeous. I’d probably just throw some Howards Feed n Wax on it and call it a day.

View Rich's profile

Rich

7750 posts in 1926 days


#4 posted 10-25-2020 04:28 AM


That is gorgeous. I’d probably just throw some Howards Feed n Wax on it and call it a day.

- SMP

Big +1 on SMP’s idea. It’s non-destructive, so if it doesn’t give you the result you want, you can move on to other ideas, but it’s a good place to start, and might just do the job.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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pottz

22376 posts in 2321 days


#5 posted 10-25-2020 04:43 AM



It looks like a nicely made piece. Before you do anything, I recommend you do some research that might include an appraiser. If it has any antique value, anything you do to it could affect the value, including refinishing. If you determine that refinishing is the way to go, I would do the minimum you can to address the scuffs and stabilize any damage to the veneer. Try to find out what the existing finish is and stay with it for any repair. Repair and stabilization is the key. Don t attempt to make it like new. To get philosophical, It is trying to tell you it s life story. Don t hide it.

- bilyo


+1

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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shipwright

8781 posts in 4135 days


#6 posted 10-25-2020 05:05 AM

+1 bilyo.
You might check a small area out of sight with a little alcohol. If it is a shellac finish which is likely if it hasn’t been messed with over the years, it can be re-polished without damaging the patina. That said if you don’t understand shellac and French polish, I revert to +1 bilyo.

Oh yes, if there is any gluing required, absolutely hide glue.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View MichaelTT's profile

MichaelTT

55 posts in 1423 days


#7 posted 10-25-2020 12:32 PM

Ok, thanks for the suggestions, I will try and report back..
Fortunately, there is no gluing required.

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