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New Pax Handsaw Drift

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Forum topic by speedoreido posted 10-23-2020 06:43 PM 445 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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speedoreido

7 posts in 615 days


10-23-2020 06:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip sharpening refurbishing question

Hello!
I’m quite new to woodworking, especially with handtools. but I’m really putting time in to learn and improve.
recently i purchased a new Pax 22in crosscut saw from lee valley. Beautiful saw compared to what i had before but i notice every time I cut it drifts to the left. I have read that can happen for a lot of reason from my technique to how it was sharpened and set. Recognizing that my technique isn’t perfect, I’m wondering if there’s other things I could try without doing any harm. I have read a few posts saying you can run a diamond plate gently along the teeth on the side it drifts to to help but I’m not sure what size or grit of plate would be best.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I’m already hooked into the handtool world and trying to absorb as much knowledge as i can. I’m trying to get my hand son a saw setting tool and saw files but the saw set seems to be nearly impossible to find in my area. i have an old Warranted Superior ripsaw handed down to be from my Grandpa which i would like to clean up, sharpen and use as my next adventure!

Regards,

Reid


6 replies so far

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Andre

3822 posts in 2719 days


#1 posted 10-23-2020 08:55 PM

I have used a small fine Arkansas Oil stone, very light passes over both sides, seemed to help when there were minor drift problems on mew saws or saws that have been sharpened and re-set. Check out Brits blogs here on LJ’s, good info on saw sharpening.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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SMP

2856 posts in 818 days


#2 posted 10-23-2020 09:04 PM

First off, a lot of new saws come with too much set. You can hammer it out with 2 hammers or a hammer and vise/anvil.
Watch the master do this here:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ITQPTH2WNOA

Second, yeah I usually run a really fine stone on the side to “deburr” the sides.i use and 8000 waterstone, just start the finest you have.

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

209 posts in 1749 days


#3 posted 10-24-2020 05:30 PM

I have that same saw. When I received mine (several years ago) it was not sharpened correctly, not even close. I had to remove the set, resharpen and reset the teeth.

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speedoreido

7 posts in 615 days


#4 posted 10-27-2020 04:03 PM

thanks everyone for all the great info. since I don’t have a saw set or files yet, I’m think going to take the safe approach and just get in the shop and make a lot of practice cuts. keep working on my technique before I go and make any changes to the saw that I can’t undo easily yet. Hopefully I can get my hands on a saw set and file to practice setting a panel saw up with the old rip saw I have laying around before doing anything wit the Pax.

Thanks again!

View AdmiralRich's profile

AdmiralRich

12 posts in 3439 days


#5 posted 10-27-2020 10:30 PM

Take a stone, or your diamond plate, and lightly dress the side of the saw that is drifting. Don’t hammer out the set. If it does not correct the issue, dress again. Rinse and repeat as necessary.

-- Elvem ipsum etiam vivere

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

213 posts in 302 days


#6 posted 10-30-2020 06:14 PM

Take one very light pass with a fine stone, along the tooth side to which the saw is pulling. Do a test cut and see if any improvement. If better, use the saw, if not and worse, take two very light passes with the stone on the opposite side of the tooth line and take a test cut again.

Remember, very light passes!

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