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Forum topic by Beautyfish posted 10-23-2020 02:52 AM 237 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beautyfish

3 posts in 198 days


10-23-2020 02:52 AM

Hi All -

I’ve been doing carpentry and home projects for a couple of decades, pretty much working with dimensional lumber and plywood, but I have started to work more with hardwood and I’m trying to learn furniture making as a hobby. I took some courses and learned how to use a jointer and planer, but in my shop I have a Dewalt 13” planer, a Dewalt 7491 table saw, and a 10” band saw that only allows cuts of about three inches high. No jointer. As long as I start with one flat face, I can use a planer sled and table saw jig to mill up boards if they aren’t too big. Recently, a friend gave me three pieces of 6×6 poplar about 30 inches long that were chunks of unfinished barn beams. These are VERY roughly cut, nowhere near square, and way too big for any of my tools as they are. I was able to use a hand plane to get one face pretty flat, at least to the point where it doesn’t wobble on my bench. I have two questions about how to get this into useable shape to make boards:

1. As long as I have a face that doesn’t wobble (but not perfectly flat by any means), can I put that through the planer? With a piece of wood that thick, it’s hard to imagine that the planer rollers would be able to push the beam hard enough to pick up the smaller inconsistencies in the planed face. After the hand planing I did, it’s still too thick to put into the planer with a sled, and I’d rather not waste wood planing it down another inch, plus I’d probably have a heart attack if I had to do that with a hand plane. I don’t have much experience with hand tools besides basic carpentry (doors, hinges, etc.), so I’m wondering whether I need to do the whole deal with winding sticks, etc. to make the face perfect, or if a face that doesn’t wobble will go through the planer the same as when I use the planer sled and shims on something smaller.

2. Once I have two parallel faces, the beam will still be too thick to get a square edge on the table saw without some kind of jig that will let me flip the beam, as my saw blade won’t extend high enough to do it in one pass. I was thinking of making a plywood box that has a bottom and four sides that I could put the beam into, with the two good faces against the long sides. I’d reference the bottom of the jig against the saw fence and have the beam peeking out of the open “top” (which will be parallel to the saw blade), and then cut a square edge in multiple passes, flipping the jig when I run out of saw blade.

Do you think this will work? I have a friend with a big bandsaw that would probably make short work of this job, but I would like to do this myself if possible. I’m still learning lots of basic skills, and milling up different sizes of stock is something I need to get better at. At some point I’ll get a bigger band saw, but for now, this is the situation. Any suggestions or tips would be very much appreciated. Thanks!


7 replies so far

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Madmark2

1819 posts in 1505 days


#1 posted 10-23-2020 03:02 AM

Plane it with the good side down until the planed side is better. Then flip and alternate sides until both sides are flat.

Rip & flip on the TS to cut thru 6”, 3” from each side.

Plane the cut edges the same as you had done with the original faces.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Beautyfish

3 posts in 198 days


#2 posted 10-23-2020 03:09 AM



Plane it with the good side down until the planed side is better. Then flip and alternate sides until both sides are flat.

Rip & flip on the TS to cut thru 6”, 3” from each side.

Plane the cut edges the same as you had done with the original faces.

- Madmark2

Thanks very much for the advice. Here’s the part I don’t understand: assuming that I now have two flat and parallel faces from the planer, but without a square edge/side, how do I use the fence when I do the “rip and flip” on the saw? I have to reference something in order to do the flip, right?

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AlaskaGuy

6213 posts in 3226 days


#3 posted 10-23-2020 03:18 AM

Did you ever wonder why they taught you to use a jointer and a planer? Get a jointer and you be set for another 20 years.

Don’t spend the next 20 years doing work arounds and using almost straight flat stock in your projects.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Madmark2

1819 posts in 1505 days


#4 posted 10-23-2020 03:23 AM

The fence should work for the first pass. You may want to attach a tall aux fence for the operation. You don’t need to get it perfect as you just need to get it flat enough to plane.

AG: Send him a check and he’ll get one ASAP

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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AlaskaGuy

6213 posts in 3226 days


#5 posted 10-23-2020 03:35 AM


The fence should work for the first pass. You may want to attach a tall aux fence for the operation. You don t need to get it perfect as you just need to get it flat enough to plane.

AG: Send him a check and he ll get one ASAP

- Madmark2

Madmark2

If you can’t afford your hobby maybe one should pick one you can. That’s what I did. I have my pilots license, use to have a airplane. Did a lot of hunting and fishing with it for a couple years when I first came to Alaska. It got damned expensive and rather keep at it half_ass I quit and took up wood working.

BTW, I wasn’t talking to you. Your a lost cause.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Aj2

3499 posts in 2715 days


#6 posted 10-23-2020 03:38 AM

Big wood big machines.

-- Aj

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SMP

2878 posts in 822 days


#7 posted 10-23-2020 04:15 AM


Thanks very much for the advice. Here s the part I don t understand: assuming that I now have two flat and parallel faces from the planer, but without a square edge/side, how do I use the fence when I do the “rip and flip” on the saw? I have to reference something in order to do the flip, right?

- Beautyfish

After doing what Madmark said Just use your hand plane and a square or combination square and mark your flat face and square an adjacent side, then you have 2 reference faces that can run against your tablesaw fence. If you watch this starting around 27 minutes and on. Craftsman have been doing it this way literally thousands of years, machines just make it easy mode.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m231_HKCOWs

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