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Forum topic by Andybb posted 10-22-2020 07:11 PM 327 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


10-22-2020 07:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veneering

Sadly, I’m getting ready to build yet another cremation container, this time for my best friend’s wife.

For this one, I have decided to use some really nice looking redwood burl from Woodcraft and affix it to MDF for a 4 corner match. Don’t have a lot of it to waste so I thought I’d ask for techniques suggestions.

I plan to put splines in the corners. Should I attach the veneer to the MDF before I cut the mitered corners or after? I bought a new, sharp 80 tooth thin kerf blade for the task. I just don’t want ragged edges or chance that the MDF would show on the corners. Figured I’d edge the MDF with a dark brown marker before assembly.

Ideas?? Suggestions??

Thanks in advance.

-- Andy - Seattle USA


15 replies so far

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jmartel

9106 posts in 3063 days


#1 posted 10-22-2020 07:16 PM

After. Glue it on, then trim it up with a knife carefully.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


#2 posted 10-22-2020 07:20 PM



After. Glue it on, then trim it up with a knife carefully.

- jmartel

That was my original thought but I want to make sure the miter angle carries through the veneer as well even though it’s really thin. But, I agree with the “after” idea cuz once it’s stuck, it’s stuck and can’t be undone without spending another $50 for another pack of the veneer.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Jim Jakosh

25468 posts in 4018 days


#3 posted 10-22-2020 07:28 PM

It has to be after if you want the splines to show. If you cut them first, the veneer will cover them up. Make sure it is glued very well and you should not have a problem cutting the spline slots.

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


#4 posted 10-22-2020 08:24 PM


It has to be after if you want the splines to show. If you cut them first, the veneer will cover them up. Make sure it is glued very well and you should not have a problem cutting the spline slots.

Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Yes. Probably did a poor job of explaining that. The splines will go into the finished box last and carefully flushed regardless of which order I apply and cut the veneer.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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jmartel

9106 posts in 3063 days


#5 posted 10-22-2020 09:05 PM

Worst case scenario, if you do end up blowing it out, you could put a 1/4” border around it with a dado blade and some solid contrasting material.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Lazyman

5932 posts in 2300 days


#6 posted 10-22-2020 09:09 PM

I assume you are using a table saw spline jig? One thing to be careful of is getting tear out on the veneer as you cut the splines Some masking tape and a zero clearance backer board should help.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Loren

10784 posts in 4561 days


#7 posted 10-22-2020 09:12 PM

Do a test with cheap veneer to see if your idea is likely to work for the result you want. That’s my suggestion.

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splintergroup

4121 posts in 2135 days


#8 posted 10-22-2020 09:58 PM

I haven’t had any issues cutting burl veneerer panels on a table saw when the veneer is “up” and the cut line is taped. That being said, it is also straight forward to veneer an already assembled box, being careful when trimming off the excess at the edges.
Be aware that most all burls have tiny holes that will seep glue when pressing. I use a double layer of paper towels against the veneer. It won’t stop the seepage, but does a wonderful job of “sucking up” the excess glue versus having a caul or other impermeable layer against the veneer which will allow the squeeze out to spread (difficult to remedy at that point)

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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


#9 posted 10-22-2020 10:00 PM


Worst case scenario, if you do end up blowing it out, you could put a 1/4” border around it with a dado blade and some solid contrasting material.

- jmartel


I assume you are using a table saw spline jig? One thing to be careful of is getting tear out on the veneer as you cut the splines Some masking tape and a zero clearance backer board should help.

- Lazyman


Do a test with cheap veneer to see if your idea is likely to work for the result you want. That s my suggestion.

- Loren

Yes, yes, and yes. All were in the back of my head. I have enough regular old veneer and MDF to build a “prototype” to develop the technique first. Thanks.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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shipwright

8618 posts in 3711 days


#10 posted 10-22-2020 11:51 PM

You can always cut your mitres a little big and finish with a disc or belt sander (stationary).

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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SMP

2856 posts in 818 days


#11 posted 10-23-2020 01:02 AM

What are you using for the splines? I use a full kerf blade so i can just use 1/8 stock as splines. I find its less work.

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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


#12 posted 10-23-2020 01:08 AM


I haven t had any issues cutting burl veneerer panels on a table saw when the veneer is “up” and the cut line is taped. That being said, it is also straight forward to veneer an already assembled box, being careful when trimming off the excess at the edges.
Be aware that most all burls have tiny holes that will seep glue when pressing. I use a double layer of paper towels against the veneer. It won t stop the seepage, but does a wonderful job of “sucking up” the excess glue versus having a caul or other impermeable layer against the veneer which will allow the squeeze out to spread (difficult to remedy at that point)

- splintergroup

Good call about the squeeze thru on the burl. I was thinking about that. I’ve got TB I, II and III, TB Hide Glue and Titebond Translucent. Any recommendations?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


#13 posted 10-23-2020 01:11 AM



What are you using for the splines? I use a full kerf blade so i can just use 1/8 stock as splines. I find its less work.

- SMP

Right you are. I’m using a flat top full kerf 1/8” blade. It’s just easier.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Robert

4134 posts in 2393 days


#14 posted 10-23-2020 09:56 AM


Worst case scenario, if you do end up blowing it out, you could put a 1/4” border around it with a dado blade and some solid contrasting material.

- jmartel


I recommend doing this anyway. Not a good idea to have exposed corners.

But to answer your question, there are several ways address the issue, my thinking it veneer first, cut miter just a bit short, make a jig, and either plane or sand (sanding probably safest).

A jig such as donkey ear attachment to a shooing board is a good idea. I just made one because I’m planning to build a bunch of veneer boxes for Christmas presents.

You may already know, but if the burl has any small gaps or holes, I would use hide glue. PVA glue will ruin your project.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Andybb

2934 posts in 1516 days


#15 posted 10-23-2020 02:45 PM


Worst case scenario, if you do end up blowing it out, you could put a 1/4” border around it with a dado blade and some solid contrasting material.

- Robert

Not sure what is meant by 1/4” boarder using a dado. Any examples of that you can point to?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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