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Forum topic by Karda posted 10-19-2020 02:34 AM 510 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

2608 posts in 1473 days


10-19-2020 02:34 AM

I wanted to make a zero clearance insert for my table saw but I can’t because there is no support on the left side of the blade. Hard board over the bed has be suggested but how do I put a fence on that thanks Mike


12 replies so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

12402 posts in 1904 days


#1 posted 10-19-2020 02:58 AM

well id say it’s time to upgrade to a better saw,question is can you afford to do that ? thats not a saw id spend a lot of time or money on.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Karda

2608 posts in 1473 days


#2 posted 10-19-2020 03:12 AM

I know what you mean, its junk, not realy it is a good saw for it purpose rough construction work. But it wasn’t meant for fine stuff. I am making some .25 x .75 tenons and this saw will make one cut at .25 next cut is less and the next less yet. so they will be done on my band saw. I joined this group after I bought my i
1st saw, i had that one replaced and the one after that but I upgraded to this one. Sears wouldn’t give a cash replacement I had to take a new saw other wise I would have gone else where. That saw was a big mistake and anew one is not in the cards. I gotta do with what I got

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MrUnix

8289 posts in 3119 days


#3 posted 10-19-2020 04:08 AM

I have a similar saw, and was able to make inserts for it after a little creative thinking. Like you said, the major problem is that it is not supported all the way around, and is fairly thin, so you need to have something stiff enough to resist the bending on any unsupported area. My opening is a bit different, but still the same fundamental design:

I made a couple of inserts for it using hardboard, and doubling it up or using ribs around the unsupported areas to remove any flex it had. I just left them unfinished and gave them a good coat of paste wax. They have held up well for several years now, although it’s use is infrequent – I mostly use it as a router table now, and leave it setup with a sled dedicated to cross cuts.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6581 posts in 3413 days


#4 posted 10-19-2020 12:07 PM

It looks like two of those pads the insert sit on have screws. If those screw holes go all they through the pad, would it be possible to make an insert that spans the opening, and then screw it down using those holes (flat head machine screws)?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4157 posts in 2400 days


#5 posted 10-19-2020 01:43 PM

Some ears that go under the table will help.

Use stout material like 1/2” polycarbonate or solid wood.

Don’t use plywood or MDF.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

226 posts in 1164 days


#6 posted 10-19-2020 02:48 PM

It looks like there are 2 small ledges at the left of the blade at the edge of the opening. If so, you can rabbet the underside of an insert to rest there, to reinforce the screw attachments on the right. Agree that you should avoid mdf or ply.

If not, perhaps some tabs can be attached to the underside of the opening to hold the left side (or, as Robert said “ears” that go under the table).

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5968 posts in 2307 days


#7 posted 10-19-2020 03:00 PM

Just a random thought…I wonder if you could use some JB Weld to form a support in the corners?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

2608 posts in 1473 days


#8 posted 10-19-2020 05:45 PM

robert those 2 small ledges are on the right side of the blade, the picture angle makes them look farther to the left, what looks like ledes on the left are chamfers, to bade they didn’t mill them out and add some screws would have been much better. The insert is snap in there are no screws, the one you see are depth adjusters to raise and lower the plate. The gap is tight on the right side of the blade, guess I ll have to learn to cut left handed thanks Mike

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therealSteveN

6673 posts in 1494 days


#9 posted 10-19-2020 07:01 PM

You partially answered your question when you started with covering the top with a piece of hardboard, then doing a through cut to make it a ZCI.

As far as the fence, ask first what is a saw fence? It’s a straight edge to either guide stuff along, or hang accessories from, both designed to help you make straight line cuts. A clamped on 2×4 jointed to have smooth, straight sides is as well. Yes maybe a little bit of a PIA versus a self clamping device, but if the saw plate doesn’t allow for an insert to be securely fastened into it, I’m gonna go out on a limb, and suggest you also don’t have the worlds best fence either.

Possibly a clamped on straight 2×4 would become a more accurate saw. It’s certainly doable, not difficult to address, and you can do some help with alignment simply by putting a 90* crossing tailpiece that runs along the front of the top.

If that is true, then you get a ZCI, add a better fence, straighter anyhow, and for just a few bux of wood, and 2 clamps.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Loren's profile

Loren

10799 posts in 4567 days


#10 posted 10-19-2020 07:06 PM



I have a similar saw, and was able to make inserts for it after a little creative thinking. Like you said, the major problem is that it is not supported all the way around, and is fairly thin, so you need to have something stiff enough to resist the bending on any unsupported area. My opening is a bit different, but still the same fundamental design:

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I did something like that too. I used a piece of lexan for the top and plywood reinforcement to make it stiff on the bottom where the opening in the saw allowed it to be thicker. I think it was 6mm birch glues to the lexan and then drilled out from the back. in the awkward areas.

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bondogaposis

5898 posts in 3271 days


#11 posted 10-19-2020 07:46 PM

I wouldn’t mess with, sell it and buy better saw. That will be the solution that will make you happier in the long run.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Karda's profile

Karda

2608 posts in 1473 days


#12 posted 10-21-2020 03:39 AM

I’m stuck with what Ive got, I could only get 50 for this saw but now way to get the other 4-500 but I am looking

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