LumberJocks

Distressing Wood

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by PsycJester posted 10-15-2020 04:16 PM 836 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View PsycJester's profile

PsycJester

10 posts in 3265 days


10-15-2020 04:16 PM

Any thoughts on how I might recreate the distressing shown in the photograph? Thanks for any advice.


26 replies so far

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

475 posts in 2772 days


#1 posted 10-15-2020 04:32 PM

Part of it looks like tear out from a planer or jointer. Heavy cuts against the grain could create that. The marks on the top look like they are from a file. A wire wheel or sandblaster can also distress wood but not like your picture.

View PsycJester's profile

PsycJester

10 posts in 3265 days


#2 posted 10-15-2020 04:36 PM

Thanks. I have a vanity for a customer and when I followed up to see if they decided on a stain color, they asked if I could distress it to look like this. Uhhh. Would have been nice to know earlier. It is made of rustic alder. I tried the wire wheel, definitely gave it a different look. I was going to try hacking at a scrap piece with a chisel and sanding to see if it gets close. The file is a good thought too. I’m going to try that also.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

3007 posts in 1403 days


#3 posted 10-15-2020 04:45 PM

get you some 2x pine lumber and beat it up with all kinds of tools
that you can find to leave similar marks. (and be sure to charge extra for it).

.

-- I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things. --

View Miles's profile

Miles

16 posts in 3354 days


#4 posted 10-15-2020 05:32 PM

I used to work at a high-end wood flooring fabricator and they had to guys who did distressing pretty much full time. The one thing they did that was kind of genius to make it look random was to get a piece of jagged demo concrete and drop it and roll it around the flooring they had laid out, maybe 10’x20’ at a time. It digs in just enough and the bumps and jagged edges of the concrete “ball” make the end result look more like nature did it than a human. Maybe try a little of that out?

View pottz's profile

pottz

20625 posts in 2224 days


#5 posted 10-15-2020 05:57 PM

beat it with a piece of chain,use an awl to create worm holes and as john said experiment with anything you think might create distress and natural wear.have fun with it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2841 posts in 787 days


#6 posted 10-15-2020 05:58 PM

Durn, Pottz beat me by about three seconds with the chain links suggestion.

Do you have children? I am sure they could do a job on it without even thinking. They could throw rocks at it, for example.

-- WWBBJ: It is better to be interesting and wrong, than boring and right.

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

655 posts in 3853 days


#7 posted 10-15-2020 06:03 PM

I’m thinking of a wire wheel against the grain

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View pottz's profile

pottz

20625 posts in 2224 days


#8 posted 10-15-2020 06:48 PM



Durn, Pottz beat me by about three seconds with the chain links suggestion.

Do you have children? I am sure they could do a job on it without even thinking. They could throw rocks at it, for example.

- wildwoodbybrianjohns


yeah but he’s 29,when he was little he sure could have,and did !

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

11269 posts in 4888 days


#9 posted 10-15-2020 07:47 PM



I m thinking of a wire wheel against the grain

- BigMig

or perhaps a wire brush. You can get them with different wire types and test. I have a steel ones for metal work and brass ones on paint scrapers too. I have one brass one that was sold as a suede brush too. Some of it could have been done with files, maybe dull ones.

View Mike_in_STL's profile

Mike_in_STL

1443 posts in 1774 days


#10 posted 10-15-2020 08:00 PM

I’ve used beer bottle caps, big bolts, lag screws, rocks, screws, crescent wrenches, the knurled knob from a Vice-Grip, screwdrivers, pliers, sock full of BBs, you name it. Give it a try, you might be surprised how your stress level diminishes as you beat the wood into submission.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

View SMP's profile

SMP

4818 posts in 1146 days


#11 posted 10-15-2020 09:09 PM

Buy one of the new made in china Stanley Bailey jack or smoothing planes. Use it straight out of the box, aiming for the smoothest surface you can get.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4066 posts in 3038 days


#12 posted 10-15-2020 09:21 PM



Buy one of the new made in china Stanley Bailey jack or smoothing planes. Use it straight out of the box, aiming for the smoothest surface you can get.

- SMP

That’s what I was thinking. Or send some wood over to that guys who’s finished work looks about 100 years older.

-- Aj

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4888 posts in 2734 days


#13 posted 10-15-2020 09:50 PM

Hard part about distressing wood is making it look random.
Those marks above look like small link dog chain?

Suggest buying 3ft lengths of all different sizes of chain, and couple lengths of 1/4” to 1/2” metal rope; from BORG or ACE. Attached all of them to quick link. Weld the quick link to hunk of 1” pipe as handle and whack the wood. Small projects need mix of smaller chain, larger project need big 1/2 chain and rope.

I prefer to avoid sharp edges as the edges of divots make stain/finish problematic.
One trick with distressing is to stain wood first, then beat it up. Even with natural wood color, the distressing becomes more pronounced and need less of it. A coat of sealer/finish, then distressing; then top coat, changes the look too.

Just like regular finish, practice on scraps first.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1432 posts in 1151 days


#14 posted 10-15-2020 11:43 PM

Some of companies out there charge an additional $50 to $80 for their distressed furniture (chests, tables and cabinets). They just ding it randomly with a combination of chains, screw drivers, misc knife cuts, wire brush, hammer marks, threaded end of a pipe, scratch awls. What ever they can think of. Normally with a matt or satin finish.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4818 posts in 1146 days


#15 posted 10-16-2020 01:02 AM



Some of companies out there charge an additional $50 to $80 for their distressed furniture (chests, tables and cabinets). They just ding it randomly with a combination of chains, screw drivers, misc knife cuts, wire brush, hammer marks, threaded end of a pipe, scratch awls. What ever they can think of. Normally with a matt or satin finish.

- WoodenDreams

Pottery Barn had some furniture called “hand planed” and it sold fpr an arm and a leg. It basically looked like someone went onto their store with a scrub plane and started planing all the tops of the furniture. Craftsman of hundreds of years ago would be laughing at being able tp charge double for not finishing the work, lol.

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com