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Forum topic by Robert posted 10-15-2020 10:45 AM 861 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Robert

4785 posts in 2764 days


10-15-2020 10:45 AM

Specifically, Milwaukee M18 knock off batteries. Reviews are mixed.

I want to buy a mini vac, but not $200 on. 9Ahr battery!

Why are cordless tool batteries so freaking expensive?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


19 replies so far

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ibewjon

2680 posts in 4077 days


#1 posted 10-15-2020 01:22 PM

Batteries are like lobster on a menu. “Market Price”. They can charge what the market will pay. And the new batteries are much better, and probably more expensive to manufacture.

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pottz

21299 posts in 2268 days


#2 posted 10-15-2020 02:00 PM

id say there like ink for a printer,cost almost as much as the printer itself-lol. i tried cheap knock off batteries once,never again,turned out they were not very cheap at all.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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controlfreak

3052 posts in 885 days


#3 posted 10-15-2020 02:30 PM

I have a lot of Ridgid cordless tools because it was about the same to buy a full set over replacing all the batteries. The team also liked the Milwaukee over the Ridgid anyway so they were al retired. So I had all of these just sitting around so I use them in my shop. As the batteries have started to wear out I have purchased some of the knock offs and have had good luck with them. I am sure you can find tools without batteries cheap in pawn shops if you feel like rolling the dice.

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jmartel

9264 posts in 3433 days


#4 posted 10-15-2020 02:41 PM

The knockoff batteries tend to not actually make nearly the same amount of power. So you have to charge them more frequently.

https://youtu.be/RjBiM0GQEe8

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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AlaskaGuy

6773 posts in 3593 days


#5 posted 10-15-2020 03:35 PM

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SMP

4953 posts in 1189 days


#6 posted 10-15-2020 03:51 PM

Yeah the printer is a good analogy, they give you the tool/printer below cost knowing they will ream you later when they gouge you with the battery packs. You are better off making your own and using “matched” batteries. Cheaper packs tend to use “leftover” cells from making good packs. Even 1 low cell in a pack can have a dramatic effect on charge, voltage etc. I’ve been doing this since I was a kid rebuilding RC car battery packs.

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ras61

132 posts in 2804 days


#7 posted 10-15-2020 04:01 PM

Because they can get away with it, if you don’t pay their price for a new battery your tool is worthless. This is why the only cordless tool I own is a drill, I use it all the time for quick fixes so it’s worth it, and when the batteries die I buy a whole new drill kit. By then the manufacturer has usual come out with a new model with different batteries that aren’t interchangeable, so you usually can’t even get an OEM batt, and the aftermarket ones are usually cheap junk from china that last about a month. Even if the OEM batt is available it’s so expensive that buying a new kit is often cheaper. Do yourself a favor, buy a tool with a cord, it’s a little more inconvenient, but you never run out of power and it’s cheaper in the long run

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

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Fred Hargis

7294 posts in 3777 days


#8 posted 10-15-2020 04:43 PM

I’ve bought after market M12 batteries, and they do well enough for a hobbyist. The Milwaukee OEMs died in about 2 years, and there was no way I’d pay their price for replacements. The aftermarkets I bought have already outlasted the OEM.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Robert

4785 posts in 2764 days


#9 posted 10-15-2020 06:21 PM

Fred, any particular brand?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Fred Hargis

7294 posts in 3777 days


#10 posted 10-15-2020 06:33 PM

The ones I got were just off Amazon, they may have been branded but I don’t recall. Later when I’m out in the shop I’ll look and see if they have some identification.

I went out to the shop to look, the ones I bought were these==. They appear to be a true generic, with no branding of any kind.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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TechTeacher

53 posts in 3679 days


#11 posted 10-15-2020 06:41 PM

control freak, The Ridgid batteries I bought a few years ago where supposed to be warrantied for life. Have not tried to get any replaced. Never use the tools because they are such junk…

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Mike_in_STL

1446 posts in 1817 days


#12 posted 10-15-2020 07:09 PM

I made the switch to Makita after my Porter Cable cordless tools from the early 2000s finally started to lose a step. Fortunately…Makita has made a decision to keep their battery architecture unchanged for quite a while and capitalized on building out a huge catalog of tools that work as a system rather than reinventing he wheel with every iteration of new tool.

I see this method with more of the pro-sumer tools and higher price lines as it builds brand loyalty. Milwaukee, Hilti, DeWalt (to a point), and even Ryobi all have started to follow suit and I’ll bet Fe$tool has as well.

Tools are easy, build it to last with some obscure failure mode so you actually can make some money with it and sell it cheap. Batteries due to proprietary designs and electronics can be sold at a premium because they know you’ll buy it or your cheap(ish) tools are paperweights.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

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CWWoodworking

2287 posts in 1462 days


#13 posted 10-15-2020 11:23 PM

Do you have to get the 9ah?

Amazon has 2 pack 6ah for 150. Not bad.

I love my battery stuff(DeWalt). I wouldn’t give it up for anything and believe the extra money it cost is worth every penny.

I haven’t had durability issues. I was expecting to burn up batteries as I use a battery sander. A lot. So far both the sander and the batteries are like new.

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SMP

4953 posts in 1189 days


#14 posted 10-16-2020 12:22 AM


Amazon has 2 pack 6ah for 150. Not bad.

- CWWoodworking

This here explains why they are so expensive. When people think $150 isn’t bad for 2 batteries, even though retail on the cells is like $2.50

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AlaskaGuy

6773 posts in 3593 days


#15 posted 10-16-2020 12:32 AM


Amazon has 2 pack 6ah for 150. Not bad.

- CWWoodworking

This here explains why they are so expensive. When people think $150 isn’t bad for 2 batteries, even though retail on the cells is like $2.50

- SMP


I that case buy a corded drill. Convenience isn’t free.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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