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Cutting stud at 75 degrees? How do I do this

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Forum topic by Art20 posted 10-14-2020 12:49 PM 894 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Art20

13 posts in 45 days


10-14-2020 12:49 PM

Hi, new to this forum.
I’m wanting to build a lean to greenhouse & for front wall frame, the plans show end of one stud is at 75 degrees. When I asked about it, the guy said it’s a 15 degree cut. 75 degrees after I make the cut. I’m confused with this comment. Would someone help me understand this or how I would make this angle cut?

On the section for rafters, the downslope shows a 14.5 degree cut with 1 in. deep cut 3-1/2 in. long. I’m thinking the 14.5 degrees is the cut after the notch is made, correct?

I have a compound miter saw & new to this. Sorry for asking what appears to be an easy question for some.


27 replies so far

View kimballd's profile

kimballd

31 posts in 2680 days


#1 posted 10-14-2020 01:21 PM

Use a speed square to draw a 75 degree angle on the end and cut it with a circular saw. You could cut a 15 degree angle and hold the the 2x at a ninety degree angle to the fence, but that could prove difficult for a beginner. If you draw it with a speed square, it’ll make sense.
Good luck, Kimball

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Axis39

376 posts in 512 days


#2 posted 10-14-2020 01:21 PM

When talking angles, it all adds up to 90… so, 90 minus 15 equals 75.

The angle gauge on your miter saw measures the angle off perpendicular. In other words, 0 degrees is square from the edge sitting against the fence. In other words, if your saw is set to a 0 degree cut, the end should be a 90 degree angle from the edge that was against the fence, or a square cut.

If you turn your blade to 15 degrees… It’s 15 degrees off that 90 degree angle. You are cutting a 15 degree wedge off. The remaining wood has a 75 degree angle….

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Art20

13 posts in 45 days


#3 posted 10-14-2020 01:24 PM



When talking angles, it all adds up to 90… so, 90 minus 15 equals 75.

The angle gauge on your miter saw measures the angle off perpendicular. In other words, 0 degrees is square from the edge sitting against the fence. In other words, if your saw is set to a 0 degree cut, the end should be a 90 degree angle from the edge that was against the fence, or a square cut.

If you turn your blade to 15 degrees… It s 15 degrees off that 90 degree angle. You are cutting a 15 degree wedge off. The remaining wood has a 75 degree angle….
Got it, thanks

- Axis39


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Axis39

376 posts in 512 days


#4 posted 10-14-2020 01:38 PM

Maybe this will help? (or, maybe I’ve misunderstood the question?)

(I realize you already understood what I was trying to say… But, I’ve seen this question a time or two and am hoping I remember this graphic next time… LOL)

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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AndyJ1s

471 posts in 671 days


#5 posted 10-14-2020 03:59 PM

I’m assuming the angle is a bevel, (relative to the face side, not the edge side, of the stud), on the end of the 2×4 stud, not an angle cut that you can just draw on the stud and follow with your saw (unless your circular saw can has > 3-5/8” depth of cut capability).

Bevel angles are often set on tools by the difference from 90 degrees which is perpendicular to the base of the tool, and referenced as 0 degrees on the saw’s scale.

So a 75 degree included angle with the face of the stud, translates to a 90-75=15 degree bevel angle on the saw.

Andy

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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Kelly

3161 posts in 3860 days


#6 posted 10-14-2020 11:28 PM

Like Axis said, play with base numbers, like 90, 180 and 360 degrees. In the end, squares, diamonds and so on all fit inside a 360 circle and you just have to count off the degrees you get by dividing the number of sides into 360, then repeating it until you get the diamond, hexagon, octagon and so on.

For example, my tablesaw cannot do 75 degree cuts, but it can do 15 degree cuts all day long. As such, to get a 75 I may need to change how I present the board to the saw.

Essentially, you are just looking at if from “another angle,” as they say. ;)

View Loren's profile

Loren

10788 posts in 4563 days


#7 posted 10-15-2020 12:07 AM

the 14.5 degree cut sounds like it may be a birdsmouth cut.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1090 posts in 2135 days


#8 posted 10-15-2020 02:22 PM



the 14.5 degree cut sounds like it may be a birdsmouth cut.

- Loren

which are easy to lay out with a speed square.
however, requires quantum mechanics for someone that hasnt used a speed square to lay out rafters before.

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Robert

4150 posts in 2396 days


#9 posted 10-15-2020 02:47 PM

Years ago a master carpenter showed me how to do without calculating angles.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Art20

13 posts in 45 days


#10 posted 10-15-2020 03:24 PM

This is a pic of rafters I’m ready to cut. Has a 1 in. deep cut by 3.5 in. Long with, it appears to be a 14.5 degree cut on the downside. How would I make this cut and should it be on both ends? Again, i have a compound miter table saw to work with.

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Art20

13 posts in 45 days


#11 posted 10-15-2020 03:24 PM

This is a pic of rafters I’m ready to cut. Has a 1 in. deep cut by 3.5 in. Long with, it appears to be a 14.5 degree cut on the downside. How would I make this cut and should it be on both ends? Again, i have a compound miter table saw to work with.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10788 posts in 4563 days


#12 posted 10-15-2020 03:30 PM

It looks like you have a birdsmouth at the top and a taper at the bottom.

how to cut tapers on a miter saw:

https://youtu.be/pk4xAtwb6_c

In terms of the birdsmouth cut, it could sort of be done on a slide compound miter saw by fiddling with the depth stop in theory, but not a standard one.

The birdsmouth and the taper can also be cut using a circular saw. This guy uses a cordless model https://youtu.be/sJz14xpfng8

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6571 posts in 3409 days


#13 posted 10-15-2020 03:33 PM

You would set your miter saw at 14.5ยบ and make the cut. It looks like the cuts need to be parallel, so keep that in mind.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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northwoodsman

413 posts in 4662 days


#14 posted 10-15-2020 03:39 PM

A picture (or screen shot) is worth a thousand words. This really helped us understand the question. Use the compound miter saw on the end cuts (or a circular saw). Use a hand saw or a jig saw to cut out the notches. There really isn’t a safe or practical way to cut the flat portion on the bottom end of the rafter on a miter saw.

-- NorthWoodsMan

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Art20

13 posts in 45 days


#15 posted 10-15-2020 04:01 PM



It looks like you have a birdsmouth at the top and a taper at the bottom.

how to cut tapers on a miter saw:

https://youtu.be/pk4xAtwb6_c

In terms of the birdsmouth cut, it could sort of be done on a slide compound miter saw by fiddling with the depth stop in theory, but not a standard one.

The birdsmouth and the taper can also be cut using a circular saw. This guy uses a cordless model https://youtu.be/sJz14xpfng8

On the birds mouth at top, it shows 1” x 3-1/2”. Would I cut a 3.5” notch 1 inch from end or 1” notch 3.5 inches from end? Also, it looks like its angled at top, does this sound right?

- Loren


It looks like you have a birdsmouth at the top and a taper at the bottom.

how to cut tapers on a miter saw:

https://youtu.be/pk4xAtwb6_c

In terms of the birdsmouth cut, it could sort of be done on a slide compound miter saw by fiddling with the depth stop in theory, but not a standard one.

The birdsmouth and the taper can also be cut using a circular saw. This guy uses a cordless model https://youtu.be/sJz14xpfng8

- Loren


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