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Rockwell/Delta 10" Tilting Arbor Saw?

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Forum topic by ras61 posted 10-13-2020 05:18 PM 556 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


10-13-2020 05:18 PM

Locally there’s one of these saws for sale and I’m looking for opinions and feedback. I think it’s from the early 70’s, it’s not a cabinet or Unisaw, more like a contractor saw with aluminum(?) webbed wings on a sheet metal base, but the motor is below the table top with a short wide belt instead of hanging out the back. The only info I’ve been able to gather is they’re really LOUD! Ear muffs will easily take care of that, so how is the quality and performance for occasional use, any benefit over a regular contractor saw? Thanks!

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860


15 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6212 posts in 3225 days


#1 posted 10-13-2020 05:26 PM

Don’t know myself. I did find this conversation. Read the second response in the thread.

https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?266293-Table-Saw-Advice-Old-Rockwell-10-quot-Tilting-Arbor-vs-Bosch-4100

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AndyJ1s

471 posts in 670 days


#2 posted 10-13-2020 06:14 PM

My grandpa had one of these saws (purchased in the early ‘70’s), later given to my dad, and later to my brother-in-law. It is a very nice saw. I used it a lot when my dad had it, before I had my own house and set up my own shop.

Hearing protection is really a good idea with every table saw, this one might encourage you to use hearing protection more religiously. When just running, it is louder than a cabinet saw, but about the same as my old Craftsman contractor saw, but with much less vibration, even though the Craftsman’s extensions were heavier, cast iron grids.

The location of the motor, under the table, takes up less floor space than conventional contractor saws that have the motor hanging out the back (like my old Craftsman I sold after I bought my Unisaw ~30 years ago.)

Open-grid table extensions are a step above stamped sheet metal extensions, since they are flatter. But open grid extensions invite getting your fingers pinched between stock and the webbing. It usually only happens once…

In short, I would recommend this saw over most contractors saws, and ANY jobsite saw. But, budget allowing, a cabinet or hybrid saw is still preferable to this saw.

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


#3 posted 10-13-2020 06:57 PM


The location of the motor, under the table, takes up less floor space than conventional contractor saws that have the motor hanging out the back (like my old Craftsman I sold after I bought my Unisaw ~30 years ago.)

In short, I would recommend this saw over most contractors saws, and ANY jobsite saw. But, budget allowing, a cabinet or hybrid saw is still preferable to this saw.

- AndyJ1s

Thanks for the feedback, very helpful. It will be stored in the garage when not in use, so I also thought it would be better to not have a motor protruding out the back. I’d love a cabinet saw, but need something a little lighter and more portable, it will have to be wheeled out to the driveway when used, and may need to be transported off site on occasion, and would be an upgrade from my old jobsite saw.

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

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ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


#4 posted 10-13-2020 11:24 PM


It is a very nice saw. I used it a lot when my dad had it, before I had my own house and set up my own shop.

Andy, what’s your opinion of the original fence?

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3831 posts in 2410 days


#5 posted 10-13-2020 11:56 PM

Hmm. A well maintained older TS is never noisy.

IMHO – Belt driven table saw are not “loud” tools. Sure they make noise, but only the direct drive cheapo models scream don’t use me without ear muffs?
TS should groan once when power is turned on; then purr like with subtle tone. Single phase motors have a distinct click 1/2-1 second after starting when the start capacitor is removed as saw reaches speed.
IME – a saw loud enough you need ear protection, says the saw needs new arbor bearings, and probably motor bearings.
If the belts are old and have taken a set due long storage, you will hear a distinct whine as saw starts, with a mid frequency 8K-11KHz constant whine at full speed; as the belts set points bend around the pulleys with each cycle.
Have rebuilt several old TS and wished I had recording of offensive noise before and purr after changing the bearings/belts; the difference is truly amazing.

Hence, TS require maintenance.
If seller has never done any, subtract for parts you need. Four decent Japanese bearings are less $50 for a 1.5HP saw. Add $10-12 for gates belt from Napa. Good idea to pay your self for doing the work, as takes 3-4 hours to change everything 1st time. ;-)

Without having saw PN or picture, cannot comment on specifics about fence.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


#6 posted 10-14-2020 12:53 AM



Without having saw PN or picture, cannot comment on specifics about fence.

The saw looks just like a model 34-335, and I think the fence is a Jet Lock

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3831 posts in 2410 days


#7 posted 10-14-2020 04:22 AM

IMHO – An early 70’s US made contractor saw will always be a little better than Asian made contractor saws that look same. But it is still a contractor saw, so it’s a lateral step from any other vintage model contractor saw.

The Jet lock fence was ‘best’ of tube fences in last century. It has a plethora of fans, and works well when properly adjusted.
It clamps on back tube and does require the front/rear tubes to be parallel to maintain square to blade across the cutting range. The jet Jock this has no operational difference from newer model Craftsman or Ridgid contractor saws with extruded aluminum fences, as they clamp to back rail too. When Craftsmen attempted to clone the Jet lock with saws made in Taiwan, the saws created and defined the nickname Crapsman. All Asian saws had unreliable tube fences until the last decade, when European sliding saws taught them how to do little better. But now plastic is cheaper than steel bars.

Note – the Jet Lock cast iron clamp bracket at back of rip fence could be cracked or broken with hard use so inspect it carefully; otherwise they last forever as long as tubes are not damaged.

Any fence that uses both front and rear rails to clamp down will never be as repeatable and easy to use as the newer style t-square fence that only clamps to front rail (as made popular by Biesemeyer or Unifence).
But if you can’t afford T-square fence on your table saw, the Jet lock on American made saw is next best thing.

A used Delta/Rockwell contractor saw should not be expensive. They sell for more than $25-$75 crapsmen saws, but less than newer model contractor saws; unless it has been recently restored and updated with newer t-square fence ($200+ cost new). The challenge with used Delta contractor saw pricing is competition. Hard to pay a lot for 1-2HP contractor saw, when vintage bullet proof 1-2HP Unisaw are often found for $400-$500?

Hope this helps.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View xedos's profile

xedos

130 posts in 216 days


#8 posted 10-15-2020 01:17 PM

Where does one find a “newer t-square fence” for $200 ?

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CaptainKlutz

3831 posts in 2410 days


#9 posted 10-15-2020 01:46 PM

Where does one find a “newer t-square fence” for $200 ? – xedos
Delta T3 30in fence is usually found for < $200. It has smaller front tube than T2 system, but works OK on contractor saws. If you want longer 50” fence, then would suggest the more expensive T2 or older Biesemeyer. The T2 fence uses same 2×3 front rail as old Biesemeyer commercial fences, and is more robust/stable in longer length.

- I find Beisemeyer/Unifence fence(s) for sale on CL often. Almost always less than $200, even < $100 occasionally.

- DIY for $125 in parts: http://www.twistedknotwoodshop.com/PDF%20Files/tsquarefence.pdf

YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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xedos

130 posts in 216 days


#10 posted 10-16-2020 03:38 AM

Thx, never seen one for less than 300$

View Robert's profile

Robert

4150 posts in 2396 days


#11 posted 10-16-2020 11:10 AM

I’d the saw is that loud, either something is wrong or it’s not an induction motor.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


#12 posted 10-16-2020 12:39 PM

Haven’t seen or heard the saw yet, just repeating something I read. Good to know though, if it is noisy I’ll know there’s a problem.

I like the idea of a smaller footprint with the motor under the deck, but this design only seemed to last a few years. In the end the rear outboard motor design which already existed ended up the winner, I guess cheaper to make or easier to service?

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

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ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


#13 posted 10-20-2020 04:46 PM

After some research and contemplation decided to pass on this one. Delta no longer makes the belts, and NOS ones go for about $80, in a few years they’ll be even more, if you can find one. There are aftermarket belts but there’s a lot of confusion and problems with getting the right size with the right number of teeth, not to mention quality that lasts more than a few months – who needs the hassle!

There’s still also the question of the motor and the noise, I saw a 34-670 that looks the same, but read from several posts it’s universal motor is a screamer and barely an improvement over direct drive. Maybe the motors on these two models are different, who knows, I think I’ll just wait for a good hybrid to come along

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

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AndyJ1s

471 posts in 670 days


#14 posted 10-20-2020 06:06 PM

Too late to matter, but since I was asked specifically about the fence..

It is the old stand-by fence that does not automatically lock in position parallel to the blade. I was always taught to measure front and back of the blade when setting the rip fence, and ignore whatever any scale says on the front rail, so it was never a big deal for me…

That is, until I got my Unisaw with a Unifence! Once the saw is aligned to the fence, it always locks parallel to the blade, and the cursor can be adjusted so it reads the actual cut dimension, every time.

-- Andy - Arlington TX

View ras61's profile

ras61

118 posts in 2436 days


#15 posted 10-20-2020 10:33 PM

Thanks Andy, good to know for anyone considering, and maybe another reason to pass

-- "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum" - James L. Petigru, 1860

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