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Forum topic by AL61 posted 10-04-2020 07:22 PM 1003 views 0 times favorited 57 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AL61

43 posts in 1544 days


10-04-2020 07:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection

I have been so overwhelmed with differing dust collection options that I have continued to ignore the problem and do what little I can with my shop vac for years now. Since I do predominantly hand tool work these days, this has not been too much of a problem. I have recently decided that I need to take the plunge on a thickness planer to aid in stock preparation, and I cannot ignore the problem any longer.

I have a basement shop that is somewhat poorly laid out due to space constraints that would be difficult to overcome, therefore, I have given up on the idea of a central system and decided a portable system that can be brought to the machines is probably best.

I really like the idea of an upstream separator since the planer will make a lot of chips to handle. I looked cyclone units from Grizzly (poor reviews), Onedia (EXPENSIVE!!!), and Laguna (too big and too expensive).

My latest thought is to get a smaller wall mount and a couple of brackets so that I can just move it from one location to another, and a use trash can style separator upstream. Simple and relatively low cost. I can buy a second unit in the future if moving from one location to another proves to be too annoying (for less than the cost of one Oneida unit!). Alternately, I might mount the unit and the separator on diy mobile base of some sort.

I am looking at the small Rockler 650 CFM and the Rikon 60-101

The Rockler has a $50 gift card promo going, so the net price is $220 + shipping. I would probably opt for either the 5 micron bag (another $40). The Rikon is about $450 an includes a 1 micron filter.

Would love to hear some thoughts about this approach!

-- Al, Connecticut, http://alsrcsite.com


57 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2136 posts in 3707 days


#1 posted 10-04-2020 08:34 PM

From the complaints I have read, these units are too small to make much difference. And a 5 micron bag is a chip collector, but does little to stop dust. I had one on my 2 hp DC till pleated filters came out. The rikon would be my choice of the two.

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AL61

43 posts in 1544 days


#2 posted 10-04-2020 09:30 PM

Thanks. I have been leaning towards the Rikon myself, but can find very little information about it and no reviews to be found. There are as many (actually more) positive reviews on the Rockler as there are negative. I think it is matter of expectations (and yes, IF I went that way my expectations would be pretty low).

I get the point about “chip collection” vs “dust” removal. The problem is that you quickly go from hundreds dollars to many multiple thousands of dollars once you start down the Bill Pentz path of ultra fine particle removal. And I am not convinced that you can ever actually remove the ultra-fine particles (Steve Johnson makes a pretty good case for why you can never fully remove ultra fine particles here)

If I were a daily user of power tools, I would be all in, but there must be some sort of practical, mid range solution for casual users (a few hours a month).

-- Al, Connecticut, http://alsrcsite.com

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1177 posts in 824 days


#3 posted 10-04-2020 09:39 PM

For wading dust in a basement workshop I would strongly recommend a Air Filtration Unit similar to this that I have in my basement shop https://www.amazon.com/WEN-3410-3-Speed-Remote-Controlled-Filtration/dp/B00LPD9BDI/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&hvadid=78271538121109&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvqmt=e&keywords=wen+3410&qid=1601845809&sr=8-1&tag=mh0b-20

The Rikon 60-101 is nice, but only has a 1.5 cubic feet collection bag capacity. unless you add a homemade cyclone style collection before it. or use a larger plastic bag. Menards offers the Rikon Products online shipped free to the store, if you live near a Menards, and 11% off rebate. You might want to consider the HF 70 gallon 2hp collector https://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-industrial-5-micron-dust-collector-97869.html

Either way add a Air Filtration Unit. For sanding, add a box fan with a furnace filter attached also.

View DaveMills's profile

DaveMills

49 posts in 313 days


#4 posted 10-04-2020 09:47 PM

Is this just coming up because of the planer? Many (most? all?) planers including the DeWalt 735 have a fan ejecting the chips as fast or faster than most dust collectors can collect. Lots of folks just shoot these straight into a trash can, or maybe some setup with a cloth bag. Of all the tools to pick to be the one that pushes you over the edge of wanting a DC, I’m thinking a planer would not be the one …

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ibewjon

2136 posts in 3707 days


#5 posted 10-04-2020 10:20 PM

Spraying the furnace filter with cooking spray helps the dust stick to a cheap filter. Sounds funny, but it worked for drywall dust. If you can, a 2 hp DC with a pleated filter is the best, and not much more money. Look for a used machine. I know of a good one near me, but Illinois would be a long ride. And the hanging Wen is also in my shop, and really helps with the fine dust. I personally think the Bill Pentz stuff goes way beyond a home shop. I am not knocking him. If I lived in my shop as a career, it would be different.

View AL61's profile

AL61

43 posts in 1544 days


#6 posted 10-04-2020 10:23 PM

Thanks again!

I do use a box fan with a furnace filter. I was actually looking at the Wen unit earlier today too. I suspect that the box fan might actually move more air. I am curious if anyone sees a benefit to a dedicated air filter vs a box fan/filter setup. Since I am lucky enough to have a walkout basement, I run another fan (no filter) directed outside too (weather permitting).

I thought about running down the Harbor Freight 2HP route. It might be kind of fun to piece something together (with a Wynn filter and cyclone). But I need something portable and even if I put it on wheels, it would probably be kind-of big. I have not completely ruled it out though.

I see a lot of guys hook up one of the DustRight bags to their planer, so that is an option I am considering too. However, I do find that despite my best efforts of using a shop vac where I can and running the fans, I end up with a layer of dust everywhere. So my goal is to try to keep things a bit cleaner than they are today.

-- Al, Connecticut, http://alsrcsite.com

View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

457 posts in 3262 days


#7 posted 10-05-2020 12:00 AM

I’m in the same camp as ibewjon and WoodenDreams… for less than you are thinking of spending on the Rikon, and just a bit over the Rockler, I would start with the HF dust collector (mobile) and an air cleaner like the WEN.
If/when you add a drum/spindle sander, spring for a cartridge filter for the HF.

BTW, did you ever finish that Cessna 182?

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View AL61's profile

AL61

43 posts in 1544 days


#8 posted 10-05-2020 12:33 AM

I put all my RC stuff aside about 2 years ago. I walk by the Cessna every time I go down to my shop though, and I’m starting to get the itch again.

-- Al, Connecticut, http://alsrcsite.com

View Eric's profile

Eric

709 posts in 787 days


#9 posted 10-05-2020 01:18 AM

I have thought about the harbor freight approach. Still want to do more research on that though. Not quite at point. Would be interested to hear what you come up with.

-- Eric, building the dream

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2136 posts in 3707 days


#10 posted 10-05-2020 01:58 AM

There are many stories on lLJ’s about buying HF, then changing impeller, filter, and possibly other alterations. And some of those admit that it is the same money as buying a Jet or Griz. Not counting the time investment, and tools if you don’t have them. I am sure you can find a decent used DC that only needs a filter upgrade for less that will work better.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2136 posts in 3707 days


#11 posted 10-05-2020 02:06 AM

I just looked at Craigslist for your state and found several dc. Look there.

View AL61's profile

AL61

43 posts in 1544 days


#12 posted 10-05-2020 02:24 AM

Thanks again for the suggestions.

-- Al, Connecticut, http://alsrcsite.com

View jklingel's profile

jklingel

150 posts in 2071 days


#13 posted 10-05-2020 05:20 AM

Regardless of your choice of dust collector, I would encourage you to get a PAPR (positive air pressure respirator). Yes, they cost a bit, but so do various lung issues. Working in a basement w/out one, IMO, is like rolling dice that are loaded the wrong way. I finally bought one a couple of years ago, and find myself slapping it on to do the smallest amount of dusty work. It is that easy to put on. What convinced me was the first time I used it. Once I took it off, I was shocked at how dusty the air felt/smelled/tasted. “And I’ve been breathing that ()&& before this?” Remember, hearse does not tow a trailer, and there is no sense in cutting life short. Either way, good luck.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6558 posts in 3407 days


#14 posted 10-05-2020 12:39 PM

I recommend you reconsider the whole situation. A basement shop will allow the finest particles (the most dangerous ones) to spread in the living area. Having a capture and contain system seems to be a little more important. I’m not crying the sky is falling, but just asking you to give this careful thought. Capturing those fine particles takes air flow, lots of it. So the larger the DC, the better. But it’s not just the DC, the ducting and tool ports have to support whatever level of collection you decide to do. The ambient air cleaner is an excellent idea as well. In the shop it’s true that the by the time the ambient cleaner catches the particles it’s already in your lungs. But by capturing the air borne particles it will mitigate their migration into the balance of the house. I realize it’s very hard to spend money on a tool that does nothing to the wood; but it’s one of the more important shop investments (IMHO). Best of luck as you sort all this out and set your self up.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4950 posts in 2902 days


#15 posted 10-05-2020 01:18 PM



I recommend you reconsider the whole situation. A basement shop will allow the finest particles (the most dangerous ones) to spread in the living area. Having a capture and contain system seems to be a little more important. I m not crying the sky is falling, but just asking you to give this careful thought. Capturing those fine particles takes air flow, lots of it. So the larger the DC, the better. But it s not just the DC, the ducting and tool ports have to support whatever level of collection you decide to do. The ambient air cleaner is an excellent idea as well. In the shop it s true that the by the time the ambient cleaner catches the particles it s already in your lungs. But by capturing the air borne particles it will mitigate their migration into the balance of the house. I realize it s very hard to spend money on a tool that does nothing to the wood; but it s one of the more important shop investments (IMHO). Best of luck as you sort all this out and set your self up.

- Fred Hargis

This is excellent advice!

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