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At what point do you apply your edge treatments?

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Forum topic by jamsomito posted 09-27-2020 06:37 PM 560 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jamsomito

589 posts in 1312 days


09-27-2020 06:37 PM

I just put a 1/8” roundover on some parts for a credenza. I cut the pieces to size, glued up the legs (4 pieces for rift-sawn faces on all 4 sides), and sanded everything to 120 grit. I figured just getting everything flush and to final shape would be good since the roundovers themselves need to be sanded too. However, since I still have 180-grit and 220-grit to go, I cant help but feel I just made a little more work for myself because now I’ll have to go over everything by hand two times to get the round-overs with both grits.

Last time I put my edge treatments on after my last grit of sandpaper, 220, but my router left a line from the bearing that was visible on the final piece. I’ve also had it where just sliding the pieces along the router table leaves marks from the stray wood chip on the table from the previous piece. So I’m thinking I need to do it earlier than the last operation on the workpiece.

Seems right before the last grit of sanding is the way to go. Is this what you do? Any other tips?


11 replies so far

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Madmark2

1725 posts in 1474 days


#1 posted 09-27-2020 07:00 PM

Sad to say there are no shortcuts to quality. You have correctly identified the options and it’s up to you to decide what is best in your circumstance.

I’m a sanding fool with my 220 ROS (I have two dedicated ROS’s, 110 & 220) and I go over the essentially final project with it looking for “holidays”.

I use the 220 vs the 110 as I consider the 110 more of a shaping grit. The 220 is a lot more forgiving.

You said you go from 180 to 220, thats a small grit step. You can double grits from 110-220-440 without intermediate steps and get the same result. Its only the final grit that matters.

Router crud, slight chipouts, snipe, stray squeezeout, fingerprints, pencil marks and other blemishes all yield to my mighty 5” 220 ROS! (Waves ROS overhead on balcony overlooking massive, cheering crowd – roaring – yaaayyyy!! Rah!)

Routed roundovers will not only have the bearing mark but the cutter itself may leave a scalloped surface (esp. if fed too fast) that needs help. I find sanding sponges are best for getting the ripple out of the contours.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Axis39

357 posts in 483 days


#2 posted 09-27-2020 07:04 PM

Once things are flat and relatively close… Usually after power sanding and before hand sanding.

I’m also quite anal about running my router over a test piece before hitting my real work piece… Can’t tell you haw many times I’ve seen that ridge! LOL. When I don’t take that extra two seconds to check, it happens EVERY damn time! I would rather have to hit everything lightly by hand, then have to fix that ridge!

I am currently working on a mahogany Greene and Greene piece. I was working on the doors the other day. I had them glued up and was fitting them. I planed the edges, and then planed the faces nice and smooth. The corners were super crisp, the surfaces shiny and burnished. I put the roundovers on, then hit everything quickly with some 320. That was all it took.

Bottom line is the roundover has to go on after all the shaping and fitting is done. (Sanding to me is hopefully not a sizing step!)

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Rich

6000 posts in 1475 days


#3 posted 09-27-2020 09:42 PM


I m a sanding fool with my 220 ROS (I have two dedicated ROS s, 110 & 220) and I go over the essentially final project with it looking for “holidays”.

I use the 220 vs the 110 as I consider the 110 more of a shaping grit. The 220 is a lot more forgiving.

You said you go from 180 to 220, thats a small grit step. You can double grits from 110-220-440 without intermediate steps and get the same result. Its only the final grit that matters.

- Madmark2

I’ve never heard of 110 and 440 grit sandpaper. Where do you buy that? Are you sure you don’t mean 100, 220 and 400?

Regardless, the simple fact is that telling someone to go from 100 to 220 t0 400, is horrible advice. You can get away with skipping every other grit, but to go in such large jumps will give a really crappy finish.

It’s a shame too. Jamsomito is a sharp guy and will ignore that advice, but what about a newcomer on here wanting to learn more about woodworking? They could possibly think you’re right and it’ll ruin their chances for a quality finish (although even rank beginners are likely to already know that a 100-220-400 sequence is hogwash.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

6000 posts in 1475 days


#4 posted 09-27-2020 09:48 PM


Seems right before the last grit of sanding is the way to go. Is this what you do? Any other tips?

- jamsomito

That would probably work. If the fibers are very compressed from the bearing, it’ll look a bit shiny, so as long as you cut through that, it shouldn’t show after the topcoat. I also wouldn’t go past 220/240. Even stopping at 180 is generally fine if you’re applying a film finish. You might go finer for oils like Tried & True that lack the solids to fill the scratches.

I’ve gotten to like those Norton MultiSand blocks, with the yellow foam and H&L pad. They make two sizes and the large one is big enough to keep an even edge down the length, and also soft enough not to leave any bevels.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Eric's profile

Eric

572 posts in 759 days


#5 posted 09-28-2020 12:03 AM

I have always put the round over just before the final sanding. An old truck I learned from my dad was to use a scrap block of the same wood, with a fine grit. Using long strokes gives a nice finished edge.

-- Eric, building the dream

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Robert

4058 posts in 2367 days


#6 posted 09-28-2020 12:06 AM

Skip the 180 you don’t need that.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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jamsomito

589 posts in 1312 days


#7 posted 09-28-2020 02:51 AM

Seems I’ve opened a can of worms about which grits to use! Haha, I’ll just gracefully step around that one…

Thanks for the thoughts on the round-overs! I think I’m going to just do them right before the last sanding next time.


I m also quite anal about running my router over a test piece before hitting my real work piece… Can t tell you haw many times I ve seen that ridge! LOL. When I don t take that extra two seconds to check, it happens EVERY damn time! I would rather have to hit everything lightly by hand, then have to fix that ridge!
- Axis39

LOL. I did that this time (scrap test), and I STILL had the ridge in some spots. Spent a good hour getting rid of those today. Argh. Can’t win.

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Axis39

357 posts in 483 days


#8 posted 09-28-2020 01:32 PM

The funny thing is, I have a small cordless trim router. I would say that 95% of the time, it has a 1/8” roundover bit in it. I get it dialed in and it stays set up like that for months.

Every time I have to use a different bit in that particular router, I grumble and contemplate buying a second small router…

Yeah, I can’t tell you how many times I dialed it in ‘too close’ and got ‘the ridge’. But, that really was when I was on the jobsite every day trying to crank stuff out as fast as possible. The router was in and out of the truck, and it was usually the only one I had with me (I’ve always had several full size routers, but rarely kept them with me), so bits got swapped out regularly. So, I got in the habit of seeing just a hairline transition corner on the top of my round overs… then, hitting them with a swipe or two of sandpaper.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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jamsomito

589 posts in 1312 days


#9 posted 09-28-2020 01:51 PM

That’s great advice, Axis. Thanks!

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CWWoodworking

1093 posts in 1065 days


#10 posted 09-28-2020 02:02 PM

Rich is right. Skipping that much is terrible.

I would probably just hit it with the last grit.

IMO you can’t make blanket statements when it comes to sanding. Different woods, different paper manufacturers will make a big difference.

For instance, I just recently switched to different manufacturer for paper. The number changed on every step. Results look exactly the same.

Also, I don’t treat oak the same as maple, pine, etc.

Different profiles also may require more attention than others.

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ChefHDAN

1772 posts in 3735 days


#11 posted 09-29-2020 02:04 PM



IMO you can’t make blanket statements when it comes to sanding. Different woods, different paper manufacturers will make a big difference.
- CWWoodworking

The only blanket statement about sanding that I would accept is “I hate sanding”

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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