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Forum topic by Karda posted 09-27-2020 06:43 AM 407 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

2542 posts in 1440 days


09-27-2020 06:43 AM

what is the difference between a resaw blade and a regular blade for a band saw thanks


10 replies so far

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therealSteveN

6475 posts in 1460 days


#1 posted 09-27-2020 08:04 AM

Blade width, and tooth geometry will determine the cut characteristics.

Here’s a quick rundown to cover most tasks:

For cutting tight curves (less than 5⁄8 ” radius) and delicate, thin materials, use a 1⁄8 ” or 3⁄16 ” 10–14-tpi standard-tooth blade.

To cut curves greater than 5⁄8 ” radius, or when cut quality matters more than speed, use a 1⁄4 ” 6-tpi standard- or skip-tooth blade.

For general ripping and crosscutting, use a 1⁄2” 3-tpi standard- or hook-tooth blade.

For resawing, use the widest 3-tpi skip- or variable-tooth blade your saw accepts. Typically, the wider the blade, the straighter it cuts.

Cutting green (undried) wood requires the widest 2–3-tpi skip-tooth blade your saw accepts.
 Dense, abrasive exotic wood species cut best with a carbide-tooth blade. It will stay sharp longer than a steel or bi-metal blade.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/tool-reviews/bandsaws/how-to-choose-bandsaw-blades

That is the general description for which blade. BUT there are people who resaw using a 3/8” blade. They have to saw much slower than someone using a wider blade, but usually get a smoother finish. Heat kills the cutting edge, and much less heat is generated by a 1” wide skip tooth blade and a low tooth count per inch, than a thinner blade, with a higher tooth count. So using a thinner blade to resaw with, will give a shorter life.

Sometimes a resaw blade will also be carbide tipped, though the majority of bandsaw blades are HSS. More so than with a Table saw blade the lower cost of a HSS blade may offset the generally much higher cost of one with carbide teeth. A case can be easily made that the teeth of the carbide toothed blade will last much longer, but some people shy from them after having the much higher priced bands break, long before the teeth become dull.

The question to ask you is, what bandsaw are you using?? A lot of the decision of which blade for what chore is driven by the saw in question. Some also will be how often will you resaw, versus curve cut?

-- Think safe, be safe

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Karda

2542 posts in 1440 days


#2 posted 09-28-2020 01:08 AM

ok thanks for the information I guess I am ok I use a 3/8ths 3 or 4 hook tooth blade. I want to usae a 1/2” but I can’t get my saw adjusted to that width, the blade rubs and that is what cam with it

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Loren

10720 posts in 4534 days


#3 posted 09-28-2020 01:16 AM

there are different opinions about band saw tracking and wheels. If you have a level you can check them for co-planarity which may give you more effective blade width. Sometimes the gauge at the back of the saw is marked for blade widths.

If the saw was used there’s a chance the seller was trying to use a too-wide blade on it.

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Karda

2542 posts in 1440 days


#4 posted 09-28-2020 01:36 AM

My saw is a 10” WEN straight fro the box. The blade that was on it was a 1/2” blade and it worked fine. The only way I can adjust a 1/2 blade is to have the gullet forward of thew center of the wheel as Snodgrass suggests otherwise the blade rubs on the frame. I think is rubbing on the frame that raises and lowers the guide block. so i don’t use a 1/2” blade, should I anyway thanks Mike

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Loren

10720 posts in 4534 days


#5 posted 09-28-2020 01:48 AM

you can resaw with a 3/8” 3 tpi blade assuming the saw has the power to do it. Sharp blades are important for resawing because the narrower the blade the easier it will deflect if not sharp. This is why serious resawers prefer wider blades with greater “beam strength”, if I recall the terms correctly.

You can regrind (sharpen) the gullets of a 3tpi blade by turning it inside out and upside down on the saw and grinding the gullets with a Dremel type tool. Works well at least a few times before the blade starts to act weird and the teeth would need reset to sharpen further.

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Karda

2542 posts in 1440 days


#6 posted 09-28-2020 01:57 AM

thanks loren I am ok I am making a display case for my wife and will be resawing some 2×4 and was wondering if there wa a better blade than my 3/8 4tpi as of now i am not a serious resawer but it could happen. if it does i will get a dedicated blade for resawing

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therealSteveN

6475 posts in 1460 days


#7 posted 09-28-2020 03:53 AM

Saw slowly. Do you know how to saw from a point? Something off the fence, so if you do get deflection (can be from dull blade, too loose a blade, or simply the user is pushing the limits of the blade, and the saw), you can steer the wood so the blade follows a line marked to show where to cut.

American Woodworker had an article a long time back on a home made fence, though there are many varieties of pretty much the same thing. Google single point fence for a bandsaw.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/bandsaw-fence/

-- Think safe, be safe

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Karda

2542 posts in 1440 days


#8 posted 09-28-2020 04:47 AM

thanks, I’ll look at it, it looks interesting

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Robert

4058 posts in 2367 days


#9 posted 09-28-2020 02:53 PM

I’ve done it the way SteveN suggests, probably me but I didn’t get as good a cut as with a fence.

A good resaw depends on a perfectly set up bandsaw and a sharp, correct blade.

Before you do anything:

1. Start by backing off all the guides and get the blade tensioned up. Don’t go by the guide. @ 6” you should barely get any deflection. Be aware changing the tension can change the tracking on some saws.

2. Check the blade for square to table before you set guides.

3. Set the guides

4. Check the fence for square to table.

5. Adjust the fence for drift.

6. Fence needs to be at least 3/4 the height of the board. Use an auxilary fence if needed.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Karda

2542 posts in 1440 days


#10 posted 09-28-2020 02:57 PM

thanks for the help

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