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Forum topic by GraceAndDrew posted 09-23-2020 06:58 PM 328 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GraceAndDrew

45 posts in 1101 days


09-23-2020 06:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wrc cedar

For some outdoor furniture, I made templates out of MDF, then rough cut the pieces out of WRC. I cut the pieces a little larger than the template because I intended to use a flush cut router bit and the templates as guides. I have done this procedure with hardwoods with no problems.

Well, the WRC splits badly when routing with the grain. I ruined several pieces and gave up. Of course I can sand the pieces to size, but routing would be much faster.

Do you have any tips?

Thanks!

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com


11 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3414 posts in 2681 days


#1 posted 09-23-2020 07:33 PM

It’s nearly impossible to give advise because we don’t know what your doing wrong.
If your routing a inside curve against the grain then I agree it’s a problem. If you tried climb cutting and still goofed it up then a sanding machine with the tube that moves up and down would obviously work.
Outside curves are usually solved by carful attention to grain direction.
That’s all I got
Good Luck

-- Aj

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2725 posts in 1045 days


#2 posted 09-23-2020 07:39 PM

how thick are the boards involved ?
how much material are you trying to remove in one pass ?
photos of your issues may get you the most accurate responses.

if the parts are for items like arms for Adirondack Chairs, that design will definitely
give you splitting problems with a pattern bit.
(what tool did you use to “rough cut” the pieces with ? and how much “excess” is over the line.
I would suggest rout one side with the grain that is easiest to cut,
then flip it over and put the MDF template on the back side to see if that is any better.
(just tossing out a possible option).
cutting almost to the line, or on it with a bandsaw and finishing up with a belt sander
may be your only option if you have exhausted all others.

other issues that could be in play is the type, age and sharpness of the router bit.
and the HP and speed of the router being used.
and how aggressive is the force to plow out the excess material.
a 3/4” will remove a lot of material quickly – and split soft wood.
a 1/4” spiral bit can be a lot more forgiving, but a little slower.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View them700project's profile

them700project

270 posts in 1901 days


#3 posted 09-23-2020 08:27 PM

Maybe you could try sanding to the line. Not as quick,accurate, or enjoyable but it will work. The one that gets me is putting too large a roundover on 2 sides of the same piece. I just got myself 2 projects in a row. the second side gets screwed up as it tries to use the first roundover to guide.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10712 posts in 4530 days


#4 posted 09-23-2020 08:44 PM

Use a template guide ring and make shallower cuts to get to depth. Test the idea at least and see if you get better results.

Climb cutting as mentioned above can help.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1714 posts in 1471 days


#5 posted 09-23-2020 11:31 PM

Route with the grain for half, stop and flip the template on the opposite side so you always route with the grain.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View GraceAndDrew's profile

GraceAndDrew

45 posts in 1101 days


#6 posted 09-24-2020 12:40 PM

Here is some more information:
3/4” thick WRC
Trying to remove about 1/8” of material.

Here’s a picture:
This is the inside arm of an Adirondack chair. I have also had splits on long, straight pieces with no curves.

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

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GraceAndDrew

45 posts in 1101 days


#7 posted 09-24-2020 12:42 PM



Route with the grain for half, stop and flip the template on the opposite side so you always route with the grain.

- Madmark2

Thank you, I’ll try it.

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

View GraceAndDrew's profile

GraceAndDrew

45 posts in 1101 days


#8 posted 09-24-2020 12:43 PM



how thick are the boards involved ?
how much material are you trying to remove in one pass ?
photos of your issues may get you the most accurate responses.

if the parts are for items like arms for Adirondack Chairs, that design will definitely
give you splitting problems with a pattern bit.
(what tool did you use to “rough cut” the pieces with ? and how much “excess” is over the line.
I would suggest rout one side with the grain that is easiest to cut,
then flip it over and put the MDF template on the back side to see if that is any better.
(just tossing out a possible option).
cutting almost to the line, or on it with a bandsaw and finishing up with a belt sander
may be your only option if you have exhausted all others.

other issues that could be in play is the type, age and sharpness of the router bit.
and the HP and speed of the router being used.
and how aggressive is the force to plow out the excess material.
a 3/4” will remove a lot of material quickly – and split soft wood.
a 1/4” spiral bit can be a lot more forgiving, but a little slower.

.

- John Smith


Thank you for the advice!

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

View Robert's profile

Robert

4048 posts in 2363 days


#9 posted 09-24-2020 01:41 PM

To clarify the issue, this problem is not routing with the grain, its routing against the grain.

What kind of bit are you using? A straight flush trim bit would be the worst possible choice for this and a compression type spiral flush trim would be the best.

One technique is to pack out the template with 1/16” thin strips and sneak up on it, doing climb cut for the finish cut.

Sometimes is helps to apply tape to both sides of the board.

Its also best to do this on a router table if the piece isn’t wide enough to fully support the base.

Summary:

1. Spiral flush trim bit (compression best)
2. Sneak up on cut
3. Climb cut against the grain

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Loren's profile

Loren

10712 posts in 4530 days


#10 posted 09-24-2020 02:50 PM

You can actually do template cuts on the band saw, or scroll saw. It’s easy to do but seldom mention. This will get you close enough to the line that fairing the curve with files and sanding shouldn’t be too time consuming.

View GraceAndDrew's profile

GraceAndDrew

45 posts in 1101 days


#11 posted 09-24-2020 02:57 PM



To clarify the issue, this problem is not routing with the grain, its routing against the grain.

What kind of bit are you using? A straight flush trim bit would be the worst possible choice for this and a compression type spiral flush trim would be the best.

One technique is to pack out the template with 1/16” thin strips and sneak up on it, doing climb cut for the finish cut.

Sometimes is helps to apply tape to both sides of the board.

Its also best to do this on a router table if the piece isn t wide enough to fully support the base.

Summary:

1. Spiral flush trim bit (compression best)
2. Sneak up on cut
3. Climb cut against the grain

- Robert

1. Spiral flush trim bit (compression best)
2. Sneak up on cut
3. Climb cut against the grain

- Robert

Yes, I’m using a three-flute flush trim bit. It is not delicate to put it mildly. I’ll try a spiral flush trim bit and try your other suggestions as well. Thank you!

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

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