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Leveling end of table top from 8x8s

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Forum topic by Cstmx160 posted 09-22-2020 10:42 PM 350 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cstmx160

1 post in 33 days


09-22-2020 10:42 PM

Wasn’t able to get a clean cut on these 8×8s due to equipment. They’re still off enough that a belt sander cannot get them level. I don’t have a saw large enough to make a cut across. How can I level?

New to woodworking. Coming over from metalwork and wanted to use these 8×8 pine timber’s for a coffee table.


10 replies so far

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2125 posts in 430 days


#1 posted 09-22-2020 10:52 PM

I would clamp them all together, and use a straightedge guide and a circular saw in several passes until I got to full depth of the blade, then finish the cut with a japanese pull saw; or ask someone else to…...............

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3722 posts in 2377 days


#2 posted 09-23-2020 04:35 AM

Welcome to LumberJocks!

Try a Skillsaw Sawsquatch or Makita 16” beam saw. Cut one side, flip and cut the other. Expensive, but easy peasy.
Not so easy, use a hand saw.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Rich's profile

Rich

5983 posts in 1472 days


#3 posted 09-23-2020 04:48 AM


Try a Skillsaw Sawsquatch

- CaptainKlutz

I almost posted that as a joke. It’s $600 after all.

To the OP, I don’t know why you say that you can’t do it with a belt sander. You certainly could, and for a lot less than $600. It’ll take some patience, but short of investing in an expensive tool, it’s your best bet.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Loren's profile

Loren

10712 posts in 4530 days


#4 posted 09-23-2020 04:58 AM

I’d say just “celebrate” the uneveness. You can square it up in a variety of ways with a lot of elbow grease though. If you insist I’d steer you towards a surform “plane” and a “sanding board” after. Think of it like car bodywork.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5983 posts in 1472 days


#5 posted 09-23-2020 05:16 AM

Since you mentioned a belt sander, I assume you have one. Go get some 36 grit belts and that thing will be flat before you know it. From there you can sand it to whatever grit you like.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1422 posts in 609 days


#6 posted 09-23-2020 01:21 PM

Clamp them babies together, stand them up, and make a router sled…
Or belt sand them. I’ve got a lot of miles using a belt sander, so that’s what I probably would do.
Either way standing them up, would help.

Just need to get a good bench to stand on.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3414 posts in 2681 days


#7 posted 09-23-2020 01:40 PM

It looks like someone is woodworking in their living room. There’s really no secret tricks when working with big timber.
Big wood big machines or make due with what you have.
If I had those timber Id cut them in half long ways so they aren’t so thick.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6297 posts in 3292 days


#8 posted 09-23-2020 02:34 PM

Few suggestions.
1. The circled board is going to piss you off and generally be a Royal pain in your neck FOREVER.

2. 8×8’s for a coffee table? What activities do you plan for the table? Holding elephants? LOL

3. Being new to woodworking I always suggest smaller projects. My Grandfather told me we learned to crawl first, not run marathons.

4. You don’t need exotic woods to produce a functional piece of furniture that looks great. Plywood with some edge banding will make a beautiful top for a coffee table and last a long time. Small enough project that you can be successful without dealing with wood splitting and wood movement right off the start.

Prove it? This was made with scrap plywood and pine edge banding.

5. Invest in some hand planes but know that too will take time and practice to get a smooth flat surface. Never mind the time and elbow grease.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1293 posts in 484 days


#9 posted 09-23-2020 03:04 PM

I would put that starfish board in the middle but bandit is right, it looks like it is itching for a fight. If this is getting cut in the Livingroom then a hand saw is going to be your only option to not spread (as much) dust all over. May want to watch some You Tube on sawing techniques before starting.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1422 posts in 609 days


#10 posted 09-23-2020 03:27 PM



I would put that starfish board in the middle but bandit is right, it looks like it is itching for a fight. If this is getting cut in the Livingroom then a hand saw is going to be your only option to not spread (as much) dust all over. May want to watch some You Tube on sawing techniques before starting.

- controlfreak

Bandit?

Just an idea,
Route in some 2 or 3” wide iron straps to go across the top and down the sides,
about 6” in from each side and put 1 in the middle.

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