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Forum topic by PresidentsDad posted 09-22-2020 01:44 PM 299 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PresidentsDad

139 posts in 1130 days


09-22-2020 01:44 PM

Hey all,
Quick question. I’ve built a number of cabinets for my shop out of plywood, but I’m about to embark on a journey of making some “real” cabinets that will have a hardwood face frame and hardwood framed doors (shaker style with plywood panel). My hardwood store’s lumber is S3S (one square edge and two parallel faces) and their 4/4 is 13/16” thick. Question: Is this particular 4/4 lumber good enough (with a some light sanding) or do I need to get 5/4 and plane it down?


11 replies so far

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DS

3574 posts in 3303 days


#1 posted 09-22-2020 01:56 PM

Most face frames are 3/4” thick, so your 13/16” should be fine. Just adjust your case for the overall depth and you’ll be fine.

When I make inset face frame cabinets, I use 7/8” thick face frames because I use 13/16” thick doors and it just works better. But for overlay doors, it doesn’t make a lot of difference.

In custom cabinetry you get to make up some of the rules. Hard and fast rules are for production cabinetry.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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PresidentsDad

139 posts in 1130 days


#2 posted 09-22-2020 02:15 PM



Most face frames are 3/4” thick, so your 13/16” should be fine. Just adjust your case for the overall depth and you’ll be fine.

When I make inset face frame cabinets, I use 7/8” thick face frames because I use 13/16” thick doors and it just works better. But for overlay doors, it doesn’t make a lot of difference.

In custom cabinetry you get to make up some of the rules. Hard and fast rules are for production cabinetry.

- DS

Thanks. Was mainly wondering if the pre-processed lumber from hardwood store would be “thick enough” even with a light sanding to make them approximately 3/4”

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Robert

4048 posts in 2363 days


#3 posted 09-22-2020 02:16 PM

Yes it is. Run it through a drum sander if you have one.

Obviously get the straightest boards you can find because you have zero room for much jointing and planing.
Rift sawn wood is good for stiles because it is less prone to bowing than flat sawn. Wider boards will usually have rift sawn at the outer parts of the board. Save the inner flat sawn with cathedral grain for the panels.

I like to check the ends of the boards, carry a block plane in case you need to freshen up an end. Ask before doing!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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bondogaposis

5872 posts in 3234 days


#4 posted 09-22-2020 02:21 PM

Usually face frames are 3/4” but 13/16” will work fine.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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PresidentsDad

139 posts in 1130 days


#5 posted 09-22-2020 02:35 PM



Usually face frames are 3/4” but 13/16” will work fine.

- bondogaposis


I would assume once I sand both sides (approx 1/32” on each side) that would get my down the 1/16” necessary to get to 3/4”

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JackDuren

1339 posts in 1842 days


#6 posted 09-22-2020 02:42 PM

Door and face frame stock is purchased at 13/16.

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Rich

5983 posts in 1472 days


#7 posted 09-22-2020 02:43 PM

If the 13/16” boards are straight enough you’ll be able to mill them to 3/4” easily. I prefer rough lumber since it’s typically 1 inch and often more and gives me more leeway.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

2664 posts in 788 days


#8 posted 09-22-2020 02:47 PM

Thats fine. But i offer this piece of advice. Make each frame from the same stick of wood. Sometimes batches of wood at big box stores are slightly different, or they change brands. I learned the hard way making a face frame from 2 pieces of wood, there ended up being almost a 1/16” difference and made the seams pretty bad. So if you don’t have a thickness planer then try to use one piece for any one frame.

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CWWoodworking

1092 posts in 1062 days


#9 posted 09-22-2020 03:23 PM

Some types of hinges don’t fit 13/16. It’s very close and usually you can make it work. Easier to sand/mill a little off.

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AlaskaGuy

6111 posts in 3192 days


#10 posted 09-22-2020 03:27 PM



If the 13/16” boards are straight enough you ll be able to mill them to 3/4” easily. I prefer rough lumber since it s typically 1 inch and often more and gives me more leeway.

- Rich


I’m in the same camp as Rich. I have never been able to get s3s or s4s as flat and straight as I can make in my shop from rough cut 4/4 lumber. I’m more anal than many here but hey it’s my time, money and pride in my work.

That being said if your 13/16 is going to be attached to a cabinet that will pull any bows out of the lumber so as long as the same thickness throughout you’ll be fine. To answer your specific question yes if it’s decent lumber you have plenty of sanding room.

There is no way I’d build the door frames with 13/16 off the shelf material. I’d buy rough cut and joint it flat and plane it.

All that being said, back in the day before I had a jointer and or planer I built cabinet door and face frames. I’m not saying it can’t be done. I can say cabinet doors I’ve built after acquiring the proper tools (jointer/ planer) look nicer and lay flat on the face frame.

BTW you didn’t say where these cabinet are going. In your shop, in someones kitchen?

This is my opinion.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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PresidentsDad

139 posts in 1130 days


#11 posted 09-22-2020 03:38 PM


If the 13/16” boards are straight enough you ll be able to mill them to 3/4” easily. I prefer rough lumber since it s typically 1 inch and often more and gives me more leeway.

- Rich

I m in the same camp as Rich. I have never been able to get s3s or s4s as flat and straight as I can make in my shop from rough cut 4/4 lumber. I m more anal than many here but hey it s my time, money and pride in my work.

That being said if your 13/16 is going to be attached to a cabinet that will pull any bows out of the lumber so as long as the same thickness throughout you ll be fine. To answer your specific question yes if it s decent lumber you have plenty of sanding room.

There is no way I d build the door frames with 13/16 off the shelf material. I d buy rough cut and joint it flat and plane it.

All that being said, back in the day before I had a jointer and or planer I built cabinet door and face frames. I m not saying it can t be done. I can say cabinet doors I ve built after acquiring the proper tools (jointer/ planer) look nicer and lay flat on the face frame.

BTW you didn t say where these cabinet are going. In your shop, in someones kitchen?

This is my opinion.

- AlaskaGuy


In my upstairs “jack and jill” bathroom. It’ll be an 7’-4” double vanity. This is a quality hardwood dealer and not your typical big box store.

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