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Worm Drive Circular Saws

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Forum topic by ed23 posted 09-21-2020 01:40 AM 352 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ed23

60 posts in 115 days


09-21-2020 01:40 AM

How do you guys like the left blade worm drives. I think after using a right blade for 45 years a left would be so strange. If the point to see the cut?


11 replies so far

View Eric's profile

Eric

557 posts in 757 days


#1 posted 09-21-2020 01:47 AM

I have always liked using the work drives, they have the power and cutting is like going through butter. However I haven’t used a left hand saw, and have only seen a couple. (The left handers that I worked with)

-- Eric, building the dream

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3118 posts in 2909 days


#2 posted 09-21-2020 01:57 AM

My old Skil 77 is a left blade. To me the advantage of the worm drive saw is that you are steering the saw from behind rather than from alongside. You have much better control that way. They are especially good at ripping 2X material. And, as Eric says, they have gobs of power. They were the best tool Skil ever made. Haven’t used Milwaukee, Makita, Bosch, or other worm drives. I suspect Skil made the Craftsman version.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View ed23's profile

ed23

60 posts in 115 days


#3 posted 09-21-2020 01:57 AM

With a left-blade saw, a righty’s left hand will cross the blade when gripping the auxiliary handle. That’s less than ideal. The saw blade is also aligned between the user’s arms, rather than outside. If you hold a workpiece with your left hand, there’s a chance of accidental contact with the blade. Such a scenario is less likely with a right-handed saw.
These are some of the problems I see with a left blade.

View pottz's profile

pottz

11717 posts in 1868 days


#4 posted 09-21-2020 02:01 AM

your obviously from the east coast,on the west coast thats all we use,sidewinders with the blade on the right side just make no sense.the blade on the left side is just common sense and ease of use,unless your left handed i guess.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View SMP's profile

SMP

2668 posts in 789 days


#5 posted 09-21-2020 02:03 AM

I have an old porter cable with the left blade. My first one was a crap and decker right blade and when I switched to the left blade I was stumped as to why so many saws have the right blade. There can’t be more left handed people than right?

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

357 posts in 481 days


#6 posted 09-21-2020 02:33 AM

I started off on sidewinders. East Coast, whaddya gonna do? But, somewhere along the line, maybe ten years into my building life, I had a left handed guy I worked with who had an old Skill 77. After using that thing for a season, I was sold.

I had a Ridgid for about fifteen or twenty years. Never had a lick of trouble with it… But, the sweetest part was the way the weight and drive felt, you could lay it up and cut a straight line with half the effort. Of course, it torques strongly when you first squeeze the trigger, but you get used to it quickly. All your effort is used pushing the saw forward, not fighting the weight of the motor trying to keep it from twisting offline.

Someone mentioned reaching across the blade to get to the front handle… I’ll be honest, I used it one handed more often than anything. The blade guard pretty much covers it anyway… Not sure how it would really be that much of a safety hazard? Maybe I am just used to the worm drive form?

When I moved across the country I inadvertently left my saw in my son’s truck. gave me a good excuse to try out the new Dewalt worm drive style battery operated saw. I gotta say, that one’s a winner! Faster than any saw I’ve ever used, has a nice balance, and just felt like home.

45 years with a sidewinder might be tough to undo, though….

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View pottz's profile

pottz

11717 posts in 1868 days


#7 posted 09-21-2020 03:25 AM

45 minutes with a skil worm drive left blade and the’ll wonder why they did.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5987 posts in 1473 days


#8 posted 09-21-2020 05:04 AM


45 minutes with a skil worm drive left blade and the ll wonder why they did.

- pottz

+1. My Skil 77M is from the days when they were made in the USA.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

389 posts in 4630 days


#9 posted 09-21-2020 08:48 PM


Someone mentioned reaching across the blade to get to the front handle… I ll be honest, I used it one handed more often than anything. The blade guard pretty much covers it anyway… Not sure how it would really be that much of a safety hazard? Maybe I am just used to the worm drive form?

- Axis39


I had to go out and look at my saw to see if it has a front handle. I never use it. Oops.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View DaveOBrien's profile

DaveOBrien

2 posts in 660 days


#10 posted 09-22-2020 05:36 PM

I started framing in 1972 as a union carpenter in San Diego. As a lefty I amazed my co-workers whenever I picked up the skill saw 77 which is used exclusively in the trades in my area. “Look at the southpaw using the skill saw!” I was an oddity back then and I soon became proficient with the skill saw but always caused a stir among the regular handed majority.
Try the worm gear saw and you will probably like it.

View DaveOBrien's profile

DaveOBrien

2 posts in 660 days


#11 posted 09-22-2020 05:46 PM

I started framing in 1972 as a union carpenter in San Diego. As a lefty I amazed my co-workers whenever I picked up the skill saw 77 which is used exclusively in the trades in my area. “Look at the southpaw using the skill saw!” I was an oddity back then and I soon became proficient with the skill saw but always caused a stir among the regular handed majority

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