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Do I need a composite pin nailer

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Forum topic by 12bar posted 09-19-2020 03:30 PM 399 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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12bar

57 posts in 1414 days


09-19-2020 03:30 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tool sawstop break and 23 gage pin nails

I have a Sawstop job site table saw. I need to use a pin naiker and I am wondering if I need to use a composite pin nailer if I cut through the pin of a 23 gauage pin. I had a salesman tell me that if I use a 23 gauage pin I can saw through the pin pin after the glue dries without setting off the safety break. Since I set it off once just by tipping the saw a blade angle a little to close to the aluminum Incra miter gage and just ticking the top edge I am skeptical of this salesman statement. I was thinking I needed a composite nail gun which would use plastic nails.
I know I can put the saw in bypass mode and cut the 23 gage nail ok but I am wondering about if I left the saw in it’s regular safety mode would I trigger the brake. Any thought or experience would be appreciated.
12 bar

-- 12 Bar


14 replies so far

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1093 posts in 1065 days


#1 posted 09-19-2020 03:51 PM

I’d be shocked if the nails don’t trip it. Put it on bypass and cut.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1423 posts in 613 days


#2 posted 09-19-2020 04:00 PM

What you need to do is quit cutting through nails… :)

View 12bar's profile

12bar

57 posts in 1414 days


#3 posted 09-19-2020 04:49 PM

Leroy that is a good idea but I need to take apart the cabinet. I can do it by putting the saw in bypass mode as the brads are 18 gage and my carbine blade will cut the brad fine but I am wondering about if it would set the brake off if I were using 23 gage nails as the salesman said 23 gage nails would not set off the brake. Of course if I hadn’t made the mistaking the first place this wouldn’t be a problem.
When I build my my other cabinets since this first one I have made sure everything was squared. My mistake was just accepting that since I was using a pocket hole jig that automatically the sides would be at 90 degrees. Bad assumption and now the back and top are on it so I either need to shim the drawers which are square or saw the cabinet apart and redo irately making it square.

-- 12 Bar

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JackDuren

1344 posts in 1845 days


#4 posted 09-19-2020 04:52 PM

They usd composite nail guns on CNC’s

View 12bar's profile

12bar

57 posts in 1414 days


#5 posted 09-19-2020 05:58 PM

I took the suggestion of turning the cabinet around and measuring diagonally from the outside instead of the inside from the front.
BIG DIFFERENCE! Outside dimensions are 33 1/4 by 33 5/16. So I am only out of square 1/16 of an inch. I then put a carpenter square checking all the corners on the outside and the corners are either square or 1/16 on one corner and 3/32 on another corner.
I think now with all your help, and thank you for all of it, my drawers will fit even if I need to shim one about 1/16”.

-- 12 Bar

View AlanWS's profile

AlanWS

88 posts in 4444 days


#6 posted 09-19-2020 08:14 PM

As long as the nails are not contacting the saw table while you cut them, they should not trip the Sawstop. I have cut through an unfortunate number of nails with mine, without triggering it.

If you want to find out, leave a nail sticking out of a board and while the saw is turned on but not spinning, touch the nail to the blade without your hands on metal. Watch the lights on the switch. They will blink if it would have triggered while moving.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1093 posts in 1065 days


#7 posted 09-19-2020 09:45 PM



As long as the nails are not contacting the saw table while you cut them, they should not trip the Sawstop. I have cut through an unfortunate number of nails with mine, without triggering it.

If you want to find out, leave a nail sticking out of a board and while the saw is turned on but not spinning, touch the nail to the blade without your hands on metal. Watch the lights on the switch. They will blink if it would have triggered while moving.

- AlanWS

So how would one cut through the nail without touching the table?

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1725 posts in 1474 days


#8 posted 09-19-2020 11:16 PM

It’s an electrical thing. As long as the nail isn’t contacting the metal saw top when the blade hits it, the saw shouldn’t fire. But really wet lumber could be conductive enough or the tip of the nail could have just exited the surface to fire the cartridge. Save yourself the worry and do those cuts – carefully – on bypass.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

6000 posts in 1475 days


#9 posted 09-19-2020 11:26 PM


It s an electrical thing. As long as the nail isn t contacting the metal saw top when the blade hits it, the saw shouldn t fire. But really wet lumber could be conductive enough or the tip of the nail could have just exited the surface to fire the cartridge. Save yourself the worry and do those cuts – carefully – on bypass.

- Madmark2

Then how does the hot dog trip it when it’s sitting on top of a board, that is, insulated from the metal table top?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Madmark2

1725 posts in 1474 days


#10 posted 09-19-2020 11:33 PM

Resistence doesn’t have to be zero, just under 10k or so. Is why wet lumber can be conductive enough to fire it. If a zero ohm contact was the only trip it would never trip on a hotdogs or a finger and it wouldn’t need that complex sensor board to decide when to trip.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

6000 posts in 1475 days


#11 posted 09-19-2020 11:50 PM


Resistence doesn t have to be zero, just under 10k or so.

- Madmark2

Nice try, but I just took my Fluke multimeter out and measured the resistance of a piece of 3/4” alder. Not even megaohms, it was an open circuit. So, a hot dog sitting on top of a board is fully insulated from the table top.

I’ll clue you in. It’s not just a resistive circuit; it’s capacitive as well. Of course, all I have is an MSEE from UW, so what do I know?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1093 posts in 1065 days


#12 posted 09-20-2020 12:06 AM

it s capacitive as well.

- Rich

This is the reason I’d be surprised if a nail in a board wouldn’t trigger it.

That and my local dealer said the main reason they send out cartridges is because people hit the blade with a tape measure.

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Rich

6000 posts in 1475 days


#13 posted 09-20-2020 12:16 AM


This is the reason I’d be surprised if a nail in a board wouldn’t trigger it.

That and my local dealer said the main reason they send out cartridges is because people hit the blade with a tape measure.

- CWWoodworking

You are exactly correct.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6319 posts in 3295 days


#14 posted 09-20-2020 05:06 AM

I ll clue you in. It s not just a resistive circuit; it s capacitive as well.

- Rich

+1 Early attempts with only resistance proved to not work well.

Of course, all I have is an MSEE from UW,

- Rich

What happened? You didn’t pay for the rest of the diploma to be spelled out?? Or did they run out of letters???

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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