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Forum topic by Floyd Hall posted 09-19-2020 12:01 AM 694 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


09-19-2020 12:01 AM

Hi. I’m finished up plans for a workbench and I’m trying to decide on a tail vise. There are two that look good — a Hovarter and an Australian made vise called HNT Gordon. Does anyone have any experience with either of these, particularly the Gordon? I plan on working with big pieces and I want to make sure it can handle them.

Floyd


16 replies so far

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SMP

4133 posts in 1018 days


#1 posted 09-19-2020 05:06 AM

I remember reading a detailed review of the HNT Gordon vise somewhere. I thought it was Derek from Inthewoodshop.com but i am not finding it on his reviews page. If I do remember I’ll post it here.

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therealSteveN

8002 posts in 1687 days


#2 posted 09-19-2020 08:11 AM

I have seen it talked about here. I put it into search here, and got this review. but I only skimmed the findings.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/reviews/12038

It appears HTN Gordon is also into hand planes, and other hand tool items, all noted here by thread, or review.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/search_results?cx=017914489645407774653%3Agwwk-zif3wk&cof=FORID%3A9&safe=high&q=HNT+Gordon&sa.x=21&sa.y=17

-- Think safe, be safe

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LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1933 days


#3 posted 09-19-2020 09:42 AM

I have a HNT mounted in my Mini-workbench Mk. II... and just to further befuddle you, I also have a HNT Tail vise mounted in the same ”Mini”.

I also have a Veritas Twin Screw mounted at the end of my main workbench… Like with my kids, I’d hate to pick my favourite… Fortunately I have the best of both worlds (vices… not bratty kids).

Personally I can only comment on what I have and confirm that I have no reservations of any of the 3 vices (ok 4 if you count vino) mentioned above… If any broke (due to misadventure, not from in-use) it’d be an immediate replacement or one nightmare trying to decide on an alternative.

Good luck and don’t have too many sleepless night contemplating.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Robert

4583 posts in 2593 days


#4 posted 09-19-2020 12:08 PM

Sturdy price fir a simple mechanism. A wagon vise is not hard to make.

That said, I find a traditional tail vise better because it does more than clamp between dogs.

Just something to consider may not fit your design

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


#5 posted 09-19-2020 09:33 PM

Thanks all. I’ve been having trouble tracking down information on the Gordon. I sent a couple emails to Australia, but I haven’t got a response.

Floyd

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LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1933 days


#6 posted 09-19-2020 10:07 PM



Thanks all. I ve been having trouble tracking down information on the Gordon. I sent a couple emails to Australia, but I haven t got a response.

Floyd

- Floyd Hall


Interesting… most Aussies are nowhere as rude as me.

Surprised there has been no answer as I’ve always found him (at wood shows) most accomodating.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


#7 posted 09-20-2020 12:19 AM


Interesting… most Aussies are nowhere as rude as me.

Surprised there has been no answer as I ve always found him (at wood shows) most accomodating.

- LittleBlackDuck

I think the first, which went through is website maybe didn’t get there. The other one I just sent the other day. Maybe he hasn’t seen it.

Anyway do you think the tail vise will work okay on bigger pieces? I’m talking mostly hand planing. It would go into an 8-foot table so I expect it to hold big pieces.

Floyd

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LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1933 days


#8 posted 09-20-2020 06:54 AM



Anyway do you think the tail vise will work okay on bigger pieces? I’m talking mostly hand planing. It would go into an 8-foot table so I expect it to hold big pieces.
- Floyd Hall

The tail vise (let’s make sure we’re both on the same page),


I wouldn’t risk on large timber. Though it can exert a lot of force, it’s dog is just too small for heavy work.

The Bench Vice,

which I think you may be referring to, has tremendous grip with minimal force and no racking, however, I have it attached to my Mini-workbench which is lightly mounted to my main workbench by light clamps. I really haven’t given it the torture test and it’s basic positioning is not conducive to large stock.

My recommendation is to quiz MagicalMichael as he probably exploits the vise for more heavier duty.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


#9 posted 09-20-2020 11:46 PM


The tail vise (let s make sure we re both on the same page),


I wouldn t risk on large timber. Though it can exert a lot of force, it s dog is just too small for heavy work.

The Bench Vice,

My recommendation is to quiz MagicalMichael as he probably exploits the vise for more heavier duty.

- LittleBlackDuck

Yeah, I left a message for MagicalMike. Anyway, the Gordon tail vise looks like a great thing for working with small pieces and I really like his take on a pattern makers vise. But right now I need a tail vise that can handle bigger pieces.

Floyd

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LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1933 days


#10 posted 09-21-2020 01:05 AM

Sorry, I mentionen my tail-vise only because I think we refer to different items by that name… was not spruiking it for this purpose.

I can only speak from my arsenal… If you need a big beefy vise, I can recommend the Veritas Twin...

however, can be subject to racking if only using the ends. To remove racking, I used to use this MDF shim set made out of 3mm MDF (others use old credit cards or business cards),

and eventually sacrificed a few shekels for this Woodpecker job,

PS. Clamped a board (45×190x1200, in real world units… mm) on my ”Mini-Vise” for some light planing. It was deliberately off centered to evaluate holding power,

was surprised how well it held… the whole bench(es) moved… you may do this with other vises… but not as ssmmmo0O0ottthhly.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


#11 posted 09-21-2020 02:05 AM


Sorry, I mentionen my tail-vise only because I think we refer to different items by that name… was not spruiking it for this purpose.

I can only speak from my arsenal… If you need a big beefy vise, I can recommend the Veritas Twin...

- LittleBlackDuck

Yeah, the Veritas twin screw vise is not going to work. It won’t fit in my pretty tight shop. I was just interested in the Gordon vises — both the face and tail vises — because they were so clever. Anyway, MagicalMike did get back to me. Think I’m going with the Hovarter. The Gordon tail vise seems great for smaller pieces, but I plan on working on working on bigger pieces, too.

Floyd

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DrTebi

402 posts in 4379 days


#12 posted 09-21-2020 02:26 AM

I wonder what type of planing of large pieces you are thinking about exactly. Personally, when I hand plane very large pieces, I don’t need at tail vise at all, I use a planing stop. That can be as simple as a board clamped to your workbench.

If you want to be adventurous, you could build your own tail vise with a geared jack screw. It’s something that I have planned for the future… it will be tricky to install right, but I like the idea, and those definitely have lots of power.

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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


#13 posted 09-21-2020 03:52 AM



I wonder what type of planing of large pieces you are thinking about exactly. Personally, when I hand plane very large pieces, I don t need at tail vise at all, I use a planing stop. That can be as simple as a board clamped to your workbench.

If you want to be adventurous, you could build your own tail vise with a geared jack screw. It s something that I have planned for the future… it will be tricky to install right, but I like the idea, and those definitely have lots of power.

- DrTebi

The answer is I don’t know. I had been planning to buy a 8i long-bed jointer. Then it seemed hand planes would work better and cheaper. Not sure it’s cheaper, but I have the planes now. Now I have to set up a station to work with them.

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DrTebi

402 posts in 4379 days


#14 posted 09-21-2020 05:22 AM

You may want to watch this video (from HNT Gordon actually), he demonstrates many solutions for securing and working with wood on a work bench:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2kzHpf0NPA

It will probably also give you an idea what their tail vise is capable of. And further, what he does when he planes larger work pieces. I find that video quite educating :)

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Floyd Hall

190 posts in 1384 days


#15 posted 09-22-2020 09:51 PM

Okay, I’ve talked to both Gordon and Hovarter and both claim their tail vises will handle pretty much anything. My concern with the Gordon was the rather low profile bench dog — 1/4 inch — that comes with the vise. That suggested it was primarily for smaller pieces. But they also sell a 1/2 and 3/4 inch dog separately. So it really looks like a coin flip, but I’m leaning toward the Hovarter.

Thanks all,

Floyd

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