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Forum topic by Rich posted 09-17-2020 04:37 AM 2540 views 0 times favorited 82 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rich

7560 posts in 1873 days


09-17-2020 04:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Quick question. I have in my possession a Shaper Origin and am diving in deep to learn its capabilities.

Is there any interest in something like a blog series where I share what I’m learning? I don’t want to invest a lot of time if no one reads it.

This thread got legs, so let’s keep it going. Meanwhile, I did begin a blog series here.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner


82 replies so far

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woodbutcherbynight

10503 posts in 3692 days


#1 posted 09-17-2020 05:51 AM

Certainly a intriguing piece of equipment. Seems quite versatile, never mind the expensive part. I would be interested in such a blog.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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pottz

21296 posts in 2267 days


#2 posted 09-17-2020 02:16 PM

ive looked at it before wondering if it’s a tool that made sense for me to own.id follow your blog,go for it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2247 posts in 1010 days


#3 posted 09-17-2020 03:30 PM

I’d check it out just to watch.
I doubt I would ever spend the money on one for what I do, but I always like to watch.
(At least this time it won’t be through a window) :>/

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Andybb

3346 posts in 1887 days


#4 posted 09-17-2020 04:47 PM

Go for it. Always thought that it was an interesting machine in the “can’t justify a Festool” category for me but like Jimmy Swaggart, I’d like to watch. :-) I need a CNC and maybe, based on the small footprint it might be worth a look.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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pottz

21296 posts in 2267 days


#5 posted 09-17-2020 05:30 PM

alright rich looks like a crowd is gathering time to start the show.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Rich

7560 posts in 1873 days


#6 posted 09-17-2020 06:05 PM

Since we have a thread going, I’ll use it instead of doing a blog.

It’s an interesting tool. I see three main buyers: Guys with more money than sense who will want one simply because it’ll be a cool addition to their systainer collection (which is likely devoid of any sawdust); A production shop could benefit by being able to use less experienced workers (less pay) to turn out accurate mill work. All it takes is a couple of hours of training; Finally there are the guys like us, who are fascinated by new tools and who, if they bought one, would use it to its fullest.

A key benefit is the consistency you get from its concept of a workspace. Once it learns the workspace from the dotted tapes, it’s there for good. You can turn the Shaper off, pull the motor, change bits and go back to work in exactly the same area. For instance, if you are making a cutout for an insert like a bow tie, you might start with an 1/8 inch bit for the outline in order to get the smallest radius at the tips, so you have less to do to get a good fit. In fact, you could design the cut pattern for the bow tie itself to include a 1/16” radius on the tips when it’s cut.

Because the workspace hasn’t changed, you can then switch to a larger diameter bit to clear out the field. It will still know exactly where it is in the workspace, and the cutout will be perfect. You can’t go outside its range during the cut or it’ll abort and instantly retract. That’s no big deal though because all that’s needed to get going again is to position the tool back in the cut lane and press the cut button. It knows where it is in the workspace and will continue the cut along the exact same path it was on before.

Another technique I use quite a bit is its offset feature. Say you’re cutting a tenon on the end of a rail or apron. Because it’s a 1/4” shank, you get some vibration and imperfect cut faces, like on the face of the tenon itself. To deal with that, you can set an offset of maybe 0.02 inches outside the line while you make the cuts a quarter-inch or so deeper per pass, until you get the length tenon you want. At that point, you simply set the offset back to zero and make a final cleanup pass around the tenon and it’s flawless. Doing those multiple passes is easy too, because it only involves stopping the cut making a couple of key presses on the touch-screen and restarting the cut, now 1/4” deeper. Takes all of about 10 seconds.

I’ll be spending most of my time using it with a workstation to manage the pieces while they’re milled. You could, however, use it to do a cutout for a 12 foot team logo in the floor of a basketball court. Just buy lots of tape.

There’s lots more going on. Their workstation looks slick, but at $400, is too steep for me. I’ve built one that does everything it does. I had V 1.0 up and running for a week and found some things lacking. I redesigned some parts and V 1.1 is gluing up in the shop right now. I’ll post a photo later today or tomorrow. V 2.0 will be a complete rebuild made of quilted maple with ebony accents.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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AlaskaGuy

6773 posts in 3592 days


#7 posted 09-17-2020 06:13 PM

Rich, that might be the tool for making juice groves on cutting boards of irregular shapes. :)

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Rich

7560 posts in 1873 days


#8 posted 09-17-2020 06:38 PM


Rich, that might be the tool for making juice groves on cutting boards of irregular shapes. :)

- AlaskaGuy

For sure, AG. You could do any pattern, like those fish bone looking ones that are a string of smaller and smaller chevrons with a spine down the middle. That would look beautiful displayed under a black velvet Elvis painting.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

7560 posts in 1873 days


#9 posted 09-17-2020 06:49 PM

One thing that comes to mind I need to point out is that there is no z-axis control when cutting. You set the depth, start the cut and it goes to that depth and stays there. It’s incredibly accurate though. One of the little starter projects is to cut a mortise for a flush ring pull. The cut depth for the outer flange is 0.07”. You just set that on the touchscreen and cut. It’s exact too, down to the thousandth.

As far as the tool goes, there’s no reason they couldn’t do a firmware update with the ability to read a 3D file format and do cuts with a varying depth. The SVG files it uses now are 2D.

Here’s the flush pull ring in a photo from their web site. I’ll post my own later:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6773 posts in 3592 days


#10 posted 09-17-2020 06:59 PM


Rich, that might be the tool for making juice groves on cutting boards of irregular shapes. :)

- AlaskaGuy

For sure, AG. You could do any pattern, like those fish bone looking ones that are a string of smaller and smaller chevrons with a spine down the middle. That would look beautiful displayed under a black velvet Elvis painting.

- Rich

Elvis painting! That’s what my shop has been missing all these years.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

1415 posts in 1924 days


#11 posted 09-17-2020 07:12 PM

Rich, thanks for starting this thread.
At this point I’d be in “category 1” if I bought one, but as time goes by I’ll be looking for excuses to place myself in “category 3”, and if I can make a good enough business case I’ll hop on board.

While I haven’t seen the workstation for it, I’m guessing you can clamp the ends of stiles end-grain-up into the workstation, and cut a tenon from the end, using the shaper? That would be pretty awesome.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View pottz's profile

pottz

21296 posts in 2267 days


#12 posted 09-17-2020 07:12 PM


Rich, that might be the tool for making juice groves on cutting boards of irregular shapes. :)

- AlaskaGuy

For sure, AG. You could do any pattern, like those fish bone looking ones that are a string of smaller and smaller chevrons with a spine down the middle. That would look beautiful displayed under a black velvet Elvis painting.

- Rich

Elvis painting! That s what my shop has been missing all these years.

- AlaskaGuy


i like a matador on velvet myself,more macho !

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

515 posts in 3253 days


#13 posted 09-17-2020 07:14 PM

I purchased it because I don’t have room for a traditional cnc machine. So a third category would be extra small work shops.

I use mine for mainly two uses: Sign making and joinery. When I made the purchase I was thinking inlays, but really haven’t done any yet. I would think that if you are into inlays, this would be an ideal machine. No templates needed! For me it does M&T joinery to the point where I don’t need a Domino or a doweling jig.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4804 posts in 3631 days


#14 posted 09-17-2020 07:45 PM

Rich – I vote for a blog since that is where most of us go looking for this kind of thing. Plus, you can make several “Chapters” in a series and include lots of pictures.

I’m with John. If I can see the value, then I might be inclined to investigate further. At some point, I need a CNC or something like the Origin. Having a blog series would make it a lot easier down the road to find specifics.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Rich's profile

Rich

7560 posts in 1873 days


#15 posted 09-17-2020 08:06 PM

John, the workstation can be seen here (not shipping yet). I had a failure in my glue up of my workstation V 1.1, so V 1.2 is in the works.

dschlic1, thanks for the input. I was hoping there would be some owners here who can teach me (and all of us) some new tricks. Please jump in anytime.

Earl, I agree with you, but the thread was an easy route to take. Some day when I get motivated, I can formalize the good parts into a blog.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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