LumberJocks

Goodbye Ridgid Table Saw?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by careforapint posted 09-14-2020 09:49 PM 428 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View careforapint's profile

careforapint

18 posts in 3348 days


09-14-2020 09:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: grizzly table saw dewalt table saw ridgid table saw recommendation

Hi,
I bought a new Ridgid TS2412 table saw many, many years ago and it’s still in great shape, but I think I’m ready to sell it and get something that’s not only safer, but more accurate. My current Ridgid has stamped steel wings and an “ok” fence, both need to be adjusted regularly to keep them square.

I have been looking at the Grizzly G0869 and like the idea of a rack and pinion fence, but it looks kinda skimpy.

Another option I saw was this DeWalt Job Site saw but it’s a lot more, probably because of the stand.

It appears that they both have an aluminum top whereas the Ridgid was cast iron. I am a home hobbyist, and use my saw primarily for breaking down sheet goods and for cutting rabbets and dadoes. I really want a saw with an adjustable riving knife and that I can hook up to my dust collection. I’m not concerned about stands as I will build something for this that’s custom. I want to use my 10” blades, and I’m thinking at least 1-3/4 HP so it doesn’t bog down for rabbets and dadoes in hardwood.

I will probably only get a Benjamin or two for my old saw (accessories included), but I still can only drop about $500. The DeWalt would push it, but I may be able to swing it.

Any thoughts?
Would you ever consider used?

-- Christopher - Virgina


14 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

2200 posts in 1435 days


#1 posted 09-14-2020 10:06 PM

With a budget of $500, people are going to tell you to look on craigslist for a used cabinet saw. Depending on your level of rehab ability, that might not be a bad option.

What about stepping up to a larger saw similar to the Delta 36-725 from Lowes?

View careforapint's profile

careforapint

18 posts in 3348 days


#2 posted 09-14-2020 10:19 PM

Hmmm, not a bad option. Delta used to be great back in the 80s-90s, but then were crap for most of the late 90s-00s. That’s when I switched to Ridgid, and honestly didn’t even consider them.

Has Delta gotten their act together now? I may have to research them some more.

Around my area (central VA) most of the saws I see on FB or Craigslist are just pure junk: saws from the 60s-70s with rusted tops and no safety features. I can rehab a saw, but I’d rather not.

-- Christopher - Virgina

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

335 posts in 4599 days


#3 posted 09-14-2020 11:30 PM

I had the Dewalt Jobsite saw for the last 3+ years; I sold it to a buddy this summer. I loved the portability and believe it or not the precision. The fence system was solid. The ability to rip up to 32” was really nice. The onboard storage for the tools was handy. If that was my budget, I would buy it again. It was extremely easy to fold up and set-up. I sold it because of the loud, noisy, whiny motor. Other than that it was a great saw. Wait for a sale. I think I paid about $200 less than that.

Edit: The miter slots were slightly different sized, enough that if you used a good aftermarket miter gauge and dialed it in for the left slot it would be too loose for the right side; if you dialed it in for the right side, it was too tight for the left one.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

345 posts in 450 days


#4 posted 09-15-2020 01:29 AM

Save more money…

... and buy used. Nothing wrong with used.

Going from that Ridgid to any jobsite saw will be a step down.

I had a Ridgid folding jobsite saw for 15 years+. It was a great saw. I used it for all kinds of work, everything from rough stuff to fine furniture. It was a good saw, but the table was a little small, and the fence was just kinda okay. But, that saw probably helped me earn half a million bucks easy. Heck, maybe a Million, if I think about it for more than a minute. I always wanted the nicer shop style saw like you have. I knew it was a step up.

The Dewalt jobsite saws I have used have all been pretty crappy. They go forever. They stand up to all kinds of abuse, banging around in the back of a pickup truck, getting rained and snowed on… and, they continue to cut decently. But, unless they’ve come up with better fences…. Maybe they’ve updated them? I dunno, I have zero interest in going back to a jobsite saw.

When I moved across the country, I changed the way I worked, and the projects I worked on. Now I have a Shop Fox hybrid saw… more horsepower, solid cabinet and a better fence.

You might find you end up using it more often, and for more varied applications when you step up to a nicer saw.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1022 posts in 1032 days


#5 posted 09-15-2020 01:39 AM

Going from that Ridgid to any jobsite saw will be a step down.

- Axis39

False.

Ridgid uses terrible fences. If the fence is bad on a table saw you don’t need to look much further. Unless you plan to replace.

I have a DeWalt portable. I really like it. The fence is excellent and accurate. The table top is not big. So if you plan on doing a lot of things with jigs/sleds, it might not be for you.

I don’t know anything about rebuilding table saws,so I don’t buy used. but you can definitely get a lot of saw on the used market If you in the right area and are inclined.

Axis39, we must have had totally different experiences. I had a rigdid for 15ish years. The fence was the worst fence I ever used. I don’t hear much good about any of them on hear. The DeWalt rack and pinion fence is excellent. It was dead On straight out of box and remains so after heavy use. I like it better than real cabinet saw fences.

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

599 posts in 933 days


#6 posted 09-15-2020 02:04 AM

There’s nothing wrong at all with the 24/12 fence on my Craftsman 315.228310, which I believe is a Ridgid with a different name on it.

I’ve used it to joint 5’ boards, and while it’s a PITA, the boards mate very well. And that’s using the edge of particle board against the fence, so any problems with either the fence or the board would add up.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6176 posts in 3262 days


#7 posted 09-15-2020 02:18 AM

Get an older Delta Contractors saw. Pre 95 ish. Those were pretty good. Make your own custom base with DC, extra drawers. Make your own mobile base and you have a solid surface and good saw to cut just about anything down.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

345 posts in 450 days


#8 posted 09-15-2020 03:48 AM



False.

Ridgid uses terrible fences. If the fence is bad on a table saw you don’t need to look much further. Unless you plan to replace.

I have a DeWalt portable. I really like it. The fence is excellent and accurate. The table top is not big. So if you plan on doing a lot of things with jigs/sleds, it might not be for you.

I don’t know anything about rebuilding table saws,so I don’t buy used. but you can definitely get a lot of saw on the used market If you in the right area and are inclined.

Axis39, we must have had totally different experiences. I had a rigdid for 15ish years. The fence was the worst fence I ever used. I don’t hear much good about any of them on hear. The DeWalt rack and pinion fence is excellent. It was dead On straight out of box and remains so after heavy use. I like it better than real cabinet saw fences.

- CWWoodworking

I guess we have had differing experiences.. I kinda wanted to qualify it a little bit more by saying I certainly haven’t tried all of their models… But, we all have different experiences.

I will say the Ridgid isn’t nearly as nice as my current saw. But, when tuned (which I only had to do a couple times in the time I owned it), it cut as nice as anything I’ve ever used. The scale was accurate (until it broke off). The tilt worked well. It handled all kinds of rips, crosscuts stuff and dados. Like I said, it made me a serious chunk of change over the years…

My only real complaint was thew table size…. But, that comes with all saws in it’s class.

I won’t be trading in my table saw for any Dewalt any time soon… But, I’m glad to hear they do make some good jobsite saws! I use a few Dewalt tools these days, my cordless worm drive is the cat’s meow! So, I wasn’t trying to dis the brand… Just share my direct experience with the smaller units.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View Steve's profile

Steve

2200 posts in 1435 days


#9 posted 09-15-2020 12:51 PM

another thing to consider is that those jobsite saws might not be the best option if you’re trying to control dust.

View careforapint's profile

careforapint

18 posts in 3348 days


#10 posted 09-15-2020 01:57 PM

These are all interesting options. My Ridgid saw itself is fine, but I’ve always hated the fence. I’m now wondering if I shouldn’t look into adding something like a Biesemeyer fence on it instead of replacing the whole saw.

After all, this is 1/2 the fun, right?

I wonder if it’s possible (safe) to retrofit a riving knife on it somehow. This model has some rather strange faceplates.

-- Christopher - Virgina

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6176 posts in 3262 days


#11 posted 09-15-2020 11:18 PM



These are all interesting options. My Ridgid saw itself is fine, but I ve always hated the fence. I m now wondering if I shouldn t look into adding something like a Biesemeyer fence on it instead of replacing the whole saw.

After all, this is 1/2 the fun, right?

I wonder if it s possible (safe) to retrofit a riving knife on it somehow. This model has some rather strange faceplates.

- careforapint

This is a good place to run ideas out and see what others might offer along the lines of making your own fence. Fence design is not all that difficult, customizing it from scratch to fit your model of saw will be the challenge.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1022 posts in 1032 days


#12 posted 09-16-2020 12:05 AM

IMO if you want more safety features and a better fence, you will have to spend more.

Grizzly, Laguna, Harvey have pretty attainable cabinet saws.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3950 posts in 2333 days


#13 posted 09-16-2020 10:44 AM

OK, so what should a ww’ing be looking at in a table saw?

Accuracy, power, durability.

1. Cast iron the more the better
2. Power – induction motor, not a universal or direct drive.
3. Fence – can’t beat a Beismeyer type
4. Trunnions – cast iron, mounted to top, not frame.

You can dress them up all you want, but a Job site saw only takes you so far in a ww’ing shop.

It all depends on what kind of ww’ing you do and your standards re: power and accuracy you

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1044 posts in 2502 days


#14 posted 09-16-2020 11:20 AM

If I can’t pay the extra for a SawStop PCS, I will be a Harvey. Shame Delta has such a horrible reputation now as I like their new uni-saw design. Griz I feel is hit or miss. Good one, you love it. A few bad ones though.

Look at the parts manuals to get an idea of the trunnion construction and how it is mounted. You can then see which saws are actually the same internally. Caution, many of the “hybrid” saws are light weight aluminum. Just repackaged contractor saws. Laguna F1, F2, Baleigh, etc. Decent, but not a big step up. You may find the same castings in different saws, but quality of machining can vary, bearings, motors etc, so even though all the castings come from only a couple foundries, and all the saws are made by about four companies, they do differ in quality based on what the brand name is paying for.

I have a slightly newer Ridgid. Accurate enough, but I really want a true riving knife ( biggest safety feature I think) and I would like a 3 HP, but my Ridgid can rip a 3×3 Oak leg once I went to good rip blades junking the combo crap. So I don’t NEED a new saw. I WANT a new saw. I installed my contractor type on a closed base with a box over the back so I have half decent dust collection.

Retrofitting a riving knife is possible, if you take the entire saw apart and design a mount on the trunnion. Making it easy to put in and out would be harder. I was looking to see if it is possible on my Ridgid, and decided it is a far better idea to buy a newer cabinet saw than braze a machined block to my trunnion. I make my own throat plates, so for me, that is no big deal. Just with my plate mounted splitters, adding the rear splitter sometimes, different thickness blades, I have a shelf full of plates, changing constantly. If I was doing it for a living, it would be wasting too much time. Of course, if I was doing it for a living I would have multiple saws, one set for crosscuts, one set for rips.

There are highly rated aftermarket fences. GOOGLE to see reviews. Vega seems to come out on top, but it is a big cost that could go to the bigger saw!

There are two basic trunnion designs. Pivot and slide. Not sure which is better or why.

The bigger and heavier, the more pleasurable it is to use. I am having a hard time justifying a PCS, so may go for the Harvery. The Laguna F3 looked good, but the distance from front edge to blade is much shorter than others. I think that would be a pain with my larger sleds. Odd man out is one of the JET saws that has a unique top size.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com