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Dyeing Leopoardwood Black

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Forum topic by jayseedub posted 09-13-2020 01:06 PM 374 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jayseedub

191 posts in 3024 days


09-13-2020 01:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dyeing dying leopardwood leopard wood leopard black ebony ebonizing ebonize

I’m trying to dye Leopardwood entirely, totally black. I’m currently using Arm-R-Seal’s water-based Ebony dye stain (two coats), but the pinkish/reddish hue still is coming through (a little).

Any suggestions for how to make it truly, truly black (short of painting it)?

Do I have to put a green dye on first to counter the red—and then black, or is there a better ebonizing stain I should use? Would that work, or is it just silliness?

—jw


14 replies so far

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Rich1955

349 posts in 449 days


#1 posted 09-13-2020 01:21 PM

India ink is what I use to dye anything black, It is a true black and it’s waterbase, and usually one coat will enough. It’s available at art supply stores, I get mine at Blicks. The only downside is your topcoat must be lacquer, for some reason poly gums up and will not dry. However, why would you want to dye Leopardwood in the first place, the grain pattern is why most people use it?

-- Rich

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jayseedub

191 posts in 3024 days


#2 posted 09-13-2020 01:32 PM

Thanks for the suggestion. Can I presume that my topcoat could also be shellac—and then anything I want—or is even shellac problematic with India Ink?

I know that I’m obscuring the contrast in the pattern—but the grain will remain there. That’s what I want to do in my design because I think it will look better, be more harmonious, less “distracting,” more modern and streamlined—while still retaining the interesting patterning that Leopardwood provides—when pairing it with my secondary wood.

Thanks for asking though—and thanks for the suggestion!

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Madmark2

2521 posts in 1646 days


#3 posted 09-13-2020 02:33 PM

Why?

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Arlin Eastman

4549 posts in 3620 days


#4 posted 09-13-2020 03:12 PM

Jay

You just doing the Rim or outside or the whole turning??

I also use India ink to high light rims or outside to highlight the inside of a turning. Just wondering if you wanted to do the whole thing why not use Maple, Sycamore or another cheaper wood??

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

2758 posts in 606 days


#5 posted 09-13-2020 04:33 PM

India ink has shellac in it, so top coating with shellac is not a problem. All india inks make the claim that they are waterproof when dry, but that is not true. Suggest buying the highest quality ink you can find.

-- WWBBJ: It is better to be interesting and wrong, than boring and right.

View pottz's profile

pottz

16315 posts in 2043 days


#6 posted 09-13-2020 05:22 PM

seems like a waste of a beautiful wood,but to each his own.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1496 posts in 2018 days


#7 posted 09-13-2020 05:39 PM


Why?

- Madmark2

Why not?

You’ll never become a high end furniture maker playing by the rules….

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Madmark2

2521 posts in 1646 days


#8 posted 09-13-2020 05:51 PM

Because lacewood is rare, expensive, and beautiful as is. Obscuring it with black ink / stain / paint is a sin.

Wood is the bones of a living critter and as such should be treated as you would have your bones treated – with respect. Obscuring the beauty is a waste of that resource. If the intent was to paint it black why not use MDF or CDX ply goods or pine?

That’s “why not”.

PS. Try black liquid shoe polish.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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JackDuren

1496 posts in 2018 days


#9 posted 09-13-2020 06:20 PM

You ever want to move up you have to experiment. Playing safe just keeps you in the masses..

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jayseedub

191 posts in 3024 days


#10 posted 09-13-2020 06:33 PM

Seems like a few of your aren’t problem solvers, more like problem creators! :-)

Thanks for the suggestions on India Ink—I’ll give that a shot.

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JackDuren

1496 posts in 2018 days


#11 posted 09-13-2020 06:42 PM

Can you spray to get the black you want?

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therealSteveN

7517 posts in 1632 days


#12 posted 09-13-2020 06:44 PM



seems like a waste of a beautiful wood,but to each his own.

- pottz

I agree 100%.

Plus you wouldn’t have Leapordwood, it would then be weird Ebony

-- Think safe, be safe

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1496 posts in 2018 days


#13 posted 09-13-2020 06:49 PM

But he still retains the grain…

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2758 posts in 606 days


#14 posted 09-13-2020 08:12 PM

This is oak ebonized with india ink, then multiple coats of shellac. You can clearly see the grain pattern.

That being said, I would do a test or two before I started on the project to see how the leopardwood grain will establish.

-- WWBBJ: It is better to be interesting and wrong, than boring and right.

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