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Jointer techique - safety

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Forum topic by unclearthur posted 09-13-2020 06:07 AM 754 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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unclearthur

383 posts in 2844 days


09-13-2020 06:07 AM

I’ve read a lot of safety instructions that say never to pass your hands over the cutterhead when jointing, but I see it commonly done on the internet. I was wondering what people do in practice?

Personally when face jointing, I always use push blocks but I do often pass the first block directly over the cutterhead (assuming the wood is say at least 1” thick and wider than the push block). Between the wood and the block there seems to be plenty keeping my skin away from the blades. I also always take light cuts.

The alternative involves more moving around of hands and position and a little less control before you can put pressure on the board on the outfeed table.

Curious as to what people do in their own shops.


20 replies so far

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1990 posts in 658 days


#1 posted 09-13-2020 10:14 AM

I have a pair gripper type padded blocks with handles that stay at the jointer. I get even pressure and sometimes “walk” the board over the cutterhead.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7498 posts in 1631 days


#2 posted 09-13-2020 11:46 AM

I too use push blocks. I used to make one with a short heel, and I have used all type of grippy bottoms, Mouse pads ehhhh, I had the best luck with a cheap outdoor floor mat, with little finger like bumps. That stuff grabbed any kind of wood, and never let go.

Since they have come out I have been using these.. I really like the gravity heel, plus the rubber bottoms are pretty grippy.

Using them I have used a hand over hand move, and I NEVER push down right over the cutters. Years ago I had a perfectly sound looking board I was face jointing, and unbeknowst to me it had a knot/fault/defect in it’s center where I couldn’t see it, and that board suddenly wasn’t there anymore. I still believe it was divine intervention that kept me safe, but I almost soiled myself. Since then I don’t have my hands within 6” of the cutterhead.

I don’t care what anyone says a close call, is/can be, the best teacher out there. But only if you are aware enough to understand what happened.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Robert's profile

Robert

4523 posts in 2537 days


#3 posted 09-13-2020 12:50 PM

For face jointing I use a push block with a heel. Never had much satisfaction with the gripper type blocks.

My one and only close call with my jointer was when I decided to wear Bluetooth earphones and accidentally left it running. I pulled the guard open to remove it for the wide board trick and stared at spinning head…......

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Rich1955's profile

Rich1955

348 posts in 447 days


#4 posted 09-13-2020 01:09 PM

For the table saw I have The Gripper, but for the jointer I use 2 grout floats. There wider then most push pads on the market, they grip very well, and have a metal backing. They work great and there inexpensive. At the beginning of the cut the first pad runs over the blade but after that they do not. I also take light cuts this way I don’t have to much resistance when pushing the work piece through.

-- Rich

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1687 posts in 783 days


#5 posted 09-13-2020 03:16 PM

I always stay on the outfeed table.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6482 posts in 3366 days


#6 posted 09-13-2020 04:15 PM

This in one reason I really like my euro style guard. Hands never go over the cutter.

Skip to the 0:24 mark.

https://youtu.be/ob3V5SVrqAw

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

485 posts in 811 days


#7 posted 09-13-2020 06:35 PM

Ditto on the Euro-style jointer guards.

My great uncle lost three fingers when he was jointing a board that “blew up” from a knot.

I don’t know if he had a guard on his jointer or not (my grandfather’s jointer did not), but if he did, it was almost certainly a pork-chop style in those days, that conveniently moves out of your way so you can keep your hand on top of the wood over the cutter head.

He did not make that mistake twice…

-- Andy - Arlington TX

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7853 posts in 3261 days


#8 posted 09-13-2020 07:36 PM

No doubt the woodworker Sam Maloof could give you practical advice on this post as well.
Look closely at some of his videos or ask Pottzy.

-- Regards Rob

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

8733 posts in 3322 days


#9 posted 09-14-2020 02:07 AM

I’m another fan of Euro guards.

View mel52's profile

mel52

2044 posts in 1321 days


#10 posted 09-14-2020 02:53 AM

This may sound a little off, but I like using the rubber floats that you use when working cement and plaster type products. They are cheap and you can get them with different thicknesses and types of hardness. I prefer the thicker and softer ones, they seem to really grab better for me. They also come in a large selection of widths and lengths. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6482 posts in 3366 days


#11 posted 09-14-2020 02:57 AM



This may sound a little off, but I like using the rubber floats that you use when working cement and plaster type products. They are cheap and you can get them with different thicknesses and types of hardness. I prefer the thicker and softer ones, they seem to really grab better for me. They also come in a large selection of widths and lengths. Mel

- mel52


Doesn’t sound off at all. What ever works safely

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

383 posts in 2844 days


#12 posted 09-14-2020 04:18 AM

Thanks all …... I never really considered boards might blow up / disappear.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2513 posts in 1645 days


#13 posted 09-14-2020 11:50 AM

A jointer isn’t an absolute must (don’t start that thread again). I don’t have to worry about guards and hand positioning and push blocks for the jointer because I don’t have a jointer because my TS and planer give me perfect S4S without one.

I check my lumber for quality before I buy it and I don’t buy twisted sticks. For half a century I’ve built everything from little boxes to full sized cabs and even houses (back in my salad days) and I defy you to look at a project and tell me if a jointer was used or no.

Remember in ww’ing, as with most things in life, there’s more than one way to skin a cat.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6482 posts in 3366 days


#14 posted 09-14-2020 01:26 PM


A jointer isn t an absolute must (don t start that thread again). I don t have to worry about guards and hand positioning and push blocks for the jointer because I don t have a jointer because my TS and planer give me perfect S4S without one.

I check my lumber for quality before I buy it and I don t buy twisted sticks. For half a century I ve built everything from little boxes to full sized cabs and even houses (back in my salad days) and I defy you to look at a project and tell me if a jointer was used or no.

Remember in ww ing, as with most things in life, there s more than one way to skin a cat.

- Madmark2


That a personal opinion that doesn’t fit everyone. A jointer is a must in my shop and I’m not alone. I skin cats with my jointer.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rich's profile

Rich

6779 posts in 1646 days


#15 posted 09-14-2020 01:38 PM


Remember in ww ing, as with most things in life, there s more than one way to skin a cat.

- Madmark2

Yes, and some ways are better than others.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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