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Protecting intricate MDF throat plate from moisture.

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Forum topic by OldBull posted 09-12-2020 10:48 PM 413 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OldBull

334 posts in 301 days


09-12-2020 10:48 PM

My little shop is in the garage and subject to an occaisional wet car. I have 2 MDF table saw throat plates and would like to protect them but I am afraid of the traditional methods of finishing MDF. Most MDF pieces are not functional and small changes do not matter. The throat plate for my table saw is precise (and tight) and i do not want to have it ruined by moisture but I also do not want to ruin it by applying finish to it. What would you do, what are your experiences with MDF throat plates, should I be concerned ?

I would appreciate any help.


13 replies so far

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

6473 posts in 1826 days


#1 posted 09-13-2020 12:55 AM

Unless I’m totally missing your gist and your car shakes itself dry (like a dog), I don’t think you need to worry. Give it a good coat of BLO (when initially made) and it’ll last till you’re ready to make a new one through functional redesign (eg. greater/smaller kerfed blade).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2267 posts in 1593 days


#2 posted 09-13-2020 12:59 AM

Don’t make it from MDF or drop it in a bucket of hot, thinned, poly and let it drink all it can (overnight).

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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pottz

14696 posts in 1989 days


#3 posted 09-13-2020 01:02 AM

if it’s that bad make one from plastic,or just keep the ones youve got coated with wax,i mean how much moisture are you talking about.is your garage also used as a sauna?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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LittleBlackDuck

6473 posts in 1826 days


#4 posted 09-13-2020 01:21 AM

Jokes aside, I believe MDF is a better choice to ply… solids would more adversely react to changes in humidity.. which in my non-scientific belief would be your demise with MDF.

Make a good fitting plate out of MDF and store it inside the house in a safe place… Then use that as a routing template to make new plates on demand. Shouldn’t take more than a few minutes if you got the method down pat.

pottzy’s right in waxing… help prevent friction albeit minimal.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4127 posts in 2499 days


#5 posted 09-13-2020 04:28 AM

I use shellac on MDF ZCI.
Plain MDF changes to much for me with humidity changes, making the ZCI loose, and shellac solves most of the issue.

Note that MDF will soak up A LOT of shellac, and don’t want that. Brush a couple coats on to seal surfaces, then sand it smooth and adjust the fit on TS (ZCI will get larger).
Shellac tends to get sticky during warm and wet weather; a coat of paste wax solves the issue.

YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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pottz

14696 posts in 1989 days


#6 posted 09-13-2020 04:39 AM

i think your over thinking this,just a little bit ?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8645 posts in 4654 days


#7 posted 09-13-2020 05:25 AM

A couple of coats of poly/BLO and you should be good to go. No need to overthink this.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6819 posts in 3498 days


#8 posted 09-13-2020 11:07 AM



Unless I m totally missing your gist and your car shakes itself dry (like a dog), I don t think you need to worry. Give it a good coat of BLO (when initially made) and it ll last till you re ready to make a new one through functional redesign (eg. greater/smaller kerfed blade).

- LittleBlackDuck

That’s kinda how I see it. Humidity isn’t going to be a problem, but liquid contact might. I’d probably skip finishing it with anything, tho’.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1378 posts in 2654 days


#9 posted 09-13-2020 11:14 AM

I use poly resin to stabilize MDF for loudspeaker builds.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

1180 posts in 1645 days


#10 posted 09-13-2020 11:26 AM

I heavily applied wax to mine and it lasted for as long as I kept the saw.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View OldBull's profile

OldBull

334 posts in 301 days


#11 posted 09-13-2020 12:13 PM

Thanks all, they were pre built ZCI and are very tight and that is why moisture was such a concern. And yes I over think everything. I once got a womans phone number and thought about the relationship all night, I woke up in the morning and threw the number away :)

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

6473 posts in 1826 days


#12 posted 09-13-2020 12:41 PM


... I once got a womans phone number and thought about the relationship all night, I woke up in the morning and through the number away :)
- OldBull

I must have dated the same woman… however, once you threw the number away, there was no way I could phone her!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View mtnwalton's profile

mtnwalton

90 posts in 2031 days


#13 posted 09-13-2020 03:49 PM

I would be more worried about my cast iron table on the table saw, assuming yours is cast iron. I have been thinking a lot lately about putting in a dehumidifier in the shop.

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