LumberJocks

Jet DC-1900 dust collector

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Greg posted 08-29-2020 09:10 PM 547 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Greg's profile

Greg

49 posts in 3660 days


08-29-2020 09:10 PM

I recently purchased a Jet DC-1900 dust collector (1995 vintage).

The wiring was altered by a previous owner and I want to put it back to the original configuration. If a fellow Woodworker has the same Dust collector, could you remove the termination box cover on the motor and post a picture of the wiring in the box.

Mine had a modified cover that allowed a run capacitor to be installed. One of the wires was corroded off of the post on the capacitor but it still ran. I think the original configuration only had the starting capacitor and not a run capacitor. I need to determine what to do with the wires that were attached to the run capacitor. They may be wires 2 and 3 as shown on the schematic in the manual but I am not certain. A picture of yours would help me confirm the proper wiring. I did find on the internet some typical diagrams with a run capacitor in circuit (not specific to this dust collector). From those diagrams, it doesn’t look like I should splice the two wires together. I called the manufacturer, they were not able to help. Thanks

-- Greg - For the benefit and enjoyment of the people


14 replies so far

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#1 posted 08-29-2020 11:52 PM

I have two. If no one gets back to you, I can photo one of them tomorrow.

View Greg's profile

Greg

49 posts in 3660 days


#2 posted 08-30-2020 07:41 PM

Thanks, any help you can provide will be appreciated.

-- Greg - For the benefit and enjoyment of the people

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#3 posted 08-31-2020 01:06 AM

Will this help

View Greg's profile

Greg

49 posts in 3660 days


#4 posted 08-31-2020 01:33 AM

Yes, It does significantly. Thank you. It looks like yours has a run capacitor wires in also. Out of curiosity, did the standard cover fit (does it look like the original cover)?

Any markings on the capacitor connected with wire nuts (indicating size or rating)?

-- Greg - For the benefit and enjoyment of the people

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#5 posted 08-31-2020 05:19 AM

BECAUSE OF YOU, I discovered, after moving beast #1 out from the wall, the lower, right bag was not only 1/4th full of fines, it had a couple dust emitting pin holes.

THAT led me to cutting my [only] 30 gallon plastic drum down to just under 30” tall, cutting out out a nearly full length inspection port, bending some 1/4” plastic, covering the 4” x 20” gap with the bent clear plastic and riveting it in place, then sealing it with caulk (in anticipation of replacing the plastic bags with a couple of these barrels), then dropping a new plastic bag in that modified barrel (until full on replacement via a sock between the collector and barrel).

NEXT came removing the right bags, which disclosed that I had not added wide, sticky seal foam, like that used between campers and pickup beds, to that side of the collector yet. Of course, that bag had even more pin holes, so was even more full.

This led me to ponder if we are friends or enemies [or if I might be my own. . . .]. ;)

ANYWAY, until a final decision, yes, mine has both a run and start capacitor. I thought I’d taken a photo of the motor, but managed to lose that one in the fray that is my computer filing system. I’ll do that part again, tomorrow, to give a better idea of the scheme of things, and to show numbers for the run and start caps.

I noted the longer cap (don’t know which of the two it was (run or start) didn’t seal to the frame of the motor. It had the gap of dimension off the fins lengths between the bottom of the cover and the screw hole.

I had to blow a lot of crap out to give you a clue to colors. That gave me an excuse to blow crap out of the motor too, so, it was all good. . . .

I noticed, from the photos, I could have moved wires around on the smaller, more square box, to give a better image of the wiring there.

Both my cap covers are stock on both machines. The square one was tight and took a couple runs at manipulating wires to get a fit that didn’t require a sledgehammer.

So, I’ll be back…

View Greg's profile

Greg

49 posts in 3660 days


#6 posted 08-31-2020 08:27 AM

Wow. You operate the same way I do. The small job always leads to something bigger. I didn’t mean to make so much work for you but I do appreciate it. My guess is that the cylindrical cover has the start capacitor and the squarish one has the run capacitor. Thanks again.

-- Greg - For the benefit and enjoyment of the people

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#7 posted 08-31-2020 04:21 PM

A good day for me is walking across the shop to get what I was after, and making it back in under an hour. Actually bringing back what I went for is icing on the cake. I got as far as I did on this project only because the collector I chose was straight back from the door. ;)

Even if grudgingly, I guess I own you a thanks, since you’re responsible for getting my collector tuned up.

I note the same problem I had with a smaller Jet collector shows up here. Before the 3hp Jets, I had a nice little 1-1/2 horse cartridge unit. I would clean the cartridge, start the unit up again, and see no real improvement.

I popped the cartridge off, peaked inside and saw that everything knocked off the cartridges [or bags on the other one] lands on the spiral plates just above the collection bags, rather than falling down into the collection bags.

Because the dust rests on the spiral plates where the air comes in, all of it gets lifted back up into the bags and cartridges.

By shaking the little one, after cleaning the filter, I could see a significant amount of dust drop down into the bags, and collection power improved notably.

Shaking these monsters isn’t as easy. Too, the plates don’t seem as inclined to give up the dust. I sprayed oil free silicone on the spirals, which may help. To really bump performance may require bending the spirals to allow the dust to drop off more easily, or it may be I need to remove a spiral and replace it with a pan like the Vortex had.

All worth noting.

Meanwhile, one of mine is a straight on collector. It handles, with exception of the two bandsaws, my fine dust makers (spindle, drum-disk and FlatMaster.

The other, with the cartridges, has a Super Dust Deputy in front of it. It tends my planer, jointer, lathes, table saw, sanding station, router table and carver. That’s my favorite of the two, because of the Deputy.

Again, I’ll try to post a couple more photos today.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#8 posted 08-31-2020 04:26 PM

Just for reference, I put an amp meter on mine a few years back and, with the load I was running, they ran at 15 amps. That could push a 12 gauge pretty hard, if the bag/cartridge were loaded or the outlets shut down. To be safe, I ran ten gauge for all my 240 toys.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#9 posted 08-31-2020 11:53 PM

More photos:

View RadRider's profile

RadRider

8 posts in 146 days


#10 posted 09-01-2020 04:18 AM



Just for reference, I put an amp meter on mine a few years back and, with the load I was running, they ran at 15 amps. That could push a 12 gauge pretty hard, if the bag/cartridge were loaded or the outlets shut down. To be safe, I ran ten gauge for all my 240 toys.

- Kelly

12 gauge wire is designed to carry 25 amps but for residential use it’s limited to 20 amps.
14 gauge is designed for 20 amps but limited to 15 by code.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#11 posted 09-01-2020 04:29 AM

Rad, are you talking about floating wires in conduit, versus three wires crammed together in a plastic sheath? That is a night and day difference in heat dissipation? Conduit makes a great heat sink.

Having a BIT of background in electronics, as well as some in marine electrical, I have long been annoyed with the ratings games played with regard to electrical panels and wiring. In the end, it’s not about current, it’s about wattage (the combination of voltage and amperage), which shows as heat in circuits, but that’s the standard that’s been used for going on a hundred years.

People, often, ramble about jumping to 240 from 120, to cut back on amp consumption. However, at the panel, nothing is saved. You have to use two breakers to get the 240 to the tool, versus one for 120, so the formulas still get you to the panel limitations.

View RadRider's profile

RadRider

8 posts in 146 days


#12 posted 09-01-2020 04:34 AM

Correct, they don’t know exactly what the loads and cable length will be in residential do they cap it at 20 amps.
The heat is distributed along the whole cable so it can handle a lot.

View Greg's profile

Greg

49 posts in 3660 days


#13 posted 09-01-2020 05:56 PM

Thanks Kelly. I appreciate the pictures. This will certainly help me get the configuration back to what it should be.

-- Greg - For the benefit and enjoyment of the people

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#14 posted 09-01-2020 10:27 PM

Cool. Glad I could pay back a little.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com