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Forum topic by Jerry posted 08-20-2020 02:30 AM 1546 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

3488 posts in 2699 days


08-20-2020 02:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tip milling

I can’t get videos to embed anymore, so just follow the link and go watch at it.

I’ve set the URL to run at the time stamp where he does the stupid thing.

I was following this video today, and I got kickback so bad it almost took my thumb off.

While I do like the interlocking system, it’s better to redo the setup to cut the rabbets with your boards flat.

That vertical cutting is flat out dangerous.

The Quarter-Quarter-Quarter Drawer System

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/


14 replies so far

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Firewood

1457 posts in 2685 days


#1 posted 08-20-2020 03:10 AM

Ouch! I hope it’s not serious or no permanent damage, Jerry. I tend to avoid those types of cuts unless the piece is supported with something like a tenon jig. I’ve used that drawer joint quite a bit. It does work pretty well.

Be careful out there

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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Jerry

3488 posts in 2699 days


#2 posted 08-20-2020 03:19 AM



Ouch! I hope it s not serious or no permanent damage, Jerry. I tend to avoid those types of cuts unless the piece is supported with something like a tenon jig. I ve used that drawer joint quite a bit. It does work pretty well.

Be careful out there

- Firewood

Nothing serious, at first I thought I might have broken it, but it’s already stopped hurting. Scared the you know what out of me though…

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3864 days


#3 posted 08-20-2020 03:26 AM

Hope you’re okay.

Yes I would say that would be one for the tenoning jig, or as you say cut it flat on the tablesaw.

Another good way to break your thumb is with a biscuit jointer. Luckily I still have two thumbs, but one was slotted for a #20 biscuit :)

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Jerry

3488 posts in 2699 days


#4 posted 08-20-2020 03:40 AM



Hope you re okay.

Yes I would say that would be one for the tenoning jig, or as you say cut it flat on the tablesaw.

Another good way to break your thumb is with a biscuit jointer. Luckily I still have two thumbs, but one was slotted for a #20 biscuit :)

- pintodeluxe

WHOA! I bet that smarted. Silly thing is I do have a tenoning jig. Made it a long time ago. Guess I just forgot I had it. Easy to get tunnel vision sometimes…

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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sansoo22

1415 posts in 705 days


#5 posted 08-20-2020 05:19 AM

The first thing I thought when I saw the video you linked to is “why not use a tenoning jig?” But you’re right that sometimes we get tunnel vision when watching a technique. We just think about repeating that setup instead of stepping back and finding safer ways to do the same thing.

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Jim Jakosh

26056 posts in 4156 days


#6 posted 08-20-2020 12:23 PM

I would never try a free cut like that. The piecs is sliding on the top surface and can kick forward or back word if it catches on anything resulting in the blade biting up into the wood. A tenon jig acts like a sled and the base is what stabilizes the cut.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Jerry

3488 posts in 2699 days


#7 posted 08-20-2020 07:21 PM



I would never try a free cut like that. The piecs is sliding on the top surface and can kick forward or back word if it catches on anything resulting in the blade biting up into the wood. A tenon jig acts like a sled and the base is what stabilizes the cut.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Right you are!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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Jerry

3488 posts in 2699 days


#8 posted 08-20-2020 07:21 PM



The first thing I thought when I saw the video you linked to is “why not use a tenoning jig?” But you re right that sometimes we get tunnel vision when watching a technique. We just think about repeating that setup instead of stepping back and finding safer ways to do the same thing.

- sansoo22

That was me in a nutshell, the mindless mimic…

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

10260 posts in 3094 days


#9 posted 08-20-2020 07:21 PM

Oh yea, no way. I don’t think I would of even tried that. Glad you’re OK. There’s better ways than what some people post out there.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5972 posts in 3402 days


#10 posted 08-20-2020 07:35 PM

Yes, it seemed like unsafe technique. I didn’t like that he wasn’t using a ZCI as well, the end of that board resting on the thinnest slivers of the blade insert edge. Glad you weren’t hurt.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1964 posts in 652 days


#11 posted 08-20-2020 08:59 PM

About the time I was looking at a tenoning jig I started to be drawn to more hand tool work. But if I were going to place narrow boards on a saw like that I would spring for a jig. I was waiting for those classic words “it happened so fast I didn’t know it till it was over” Glad your okay and glad you posted for others.

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unclearthur

383 posts in 2838 days


#12 posted 08-20-2020 11:09 PM

In this FW video, starting at 2:00 he does a number of vertical cuts on the TS (no tenon jig) using a tall fence.

I’ve copied that jig and made those cuts and not felt unsafe ….... albeit compared to the OP’s example, the boards were thicker and less narrow, the fence was taller, there was a zero clearance insert and I use a featherboard to help press the board to the fence prior to the blade.

I guess its largely about the details …...

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therealSteveN

7463 posts in 1625 days


#13 posted 08-21-2020 02:27 PM

A pretty standard cut in a lot of shops. What he didn’t have, and it helps control the board a lot is a tenoning jig, homemade, fence straddling, with a TALL board, so as to completely side support the stock, and a backup strip behind the stock, OR some variation of that. Especially if your stock is clamped to the jig, it has to follow along where you push the jig, being the jig is straddling the locked down fence, there is little room for movement, unlike the HUGE realm of possibilities for movement just hand holding it. Done freehand I am always amazed not to see it kickback.

When I do these, and I make drawers this way more often than not. I make all my cuts flat to the table, it’s just perspective as to which side you cut from, you can still make all the same cuts needed when flat.

I should point out done flat you actually have the same circumstances for kickback if you just shove it forward with a standard miter gauge. You need to do them with a miter gauge that has a WIDE face on it. Either a solid piece of metal track like Kreg uses, or at least a board, or glue up plywood pushing from behind to get away from the potential tippy point, where it all is suddenly coming back at you.

Pick one, all of them work pretty much the same. I have a Kreg miter gauge I like to use, so I have a Kreg track, and beside being able to attach all sorts of 1/4 20 stuff to it, it’s very rigid. Just make sure to adjust it left of the blade, or you hear that expensive sounding noise…...... :-(

https://www.google.com/search?q=miter+gauge+with+a+wide+fence+attached&client=opera&hs=DZB&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiB0_KDwqzrAhXXQc0KHalOA8cQ_AUoAnoECA0QBA&biw=1320&bih=627

So once you correct for his wild west cutting style, what he is saying about 1/4 1/4 1/4 is all legit, and for a sound, serviceable, drawer for shops and non show grade furniture drawers it’s all pretty good as a way to do them. But he is a Cowboy who isn’t a, if he is gonna whack something off, it’s just a when.

Using guards, and proper work support, really is much less time than the rehab time after a finger goes zip. I guess it just depends on how you want to spend it, all at once, or a little bit each time you are in the shop. Biggest plus is jigs are cheap, often made from scraps. Fingers cost a LOT of $$$$$$$.

-- Think safe, be safe

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LeeRoyMan

1672 posts in 778 days


#14 posted 08-21-2020 02:40 PM

Sometimes it ain’t pretty, but…...better than nuttin

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