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Rare Stanley Plane Casting Feature

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Forum topic by drsurfrat posted 08-19-2020 02:39 PM 770 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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drsurfrat

975 posts in 399 days


08-19-2020 02:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: stanley bailey casting marks rare rarity bench plane block plane srl

I have two hand planes that John Walters says are rare, and wanted to share. They both have an “S R & L” casting mark from what he says is from 1899-1900. One is a No 6 stumpy jointer, one is a No 19 block.

From John Walter’s ”Antique & Collectable Stanley Tools

from page 697
“A rare variation has “S R & L” cast in raised letters behind the cutter seat.”

from page 705
“The most interesting and rarest casting mark seen was on the plane bottom of a No 19, type 5, 1899-1900 (see type study). “S R & L” is cast directly behind the machined area where the plane iron rests and in front of the lever cap screw hole (FIGURE 2). It occurs where normally an “S” casting mark is found. Only about six specimens of No 18 or No 19 block planes are known with this feature and its significance is unknown. The ”S R & L” mark is also known on a very few early specimens of bench planes and on No 9 1/2 and No 15 blocks, but their age has not been documented.”

It is very cool to have run across not one, but two of these. Anyone know what to do with them? Is there a historical group that would appreciate seeing them (especially since I am near Boston)? Is there anything recently that says they aren’t all that rare?

You may want to check under the tote of your type 7 bench planes…

Mike

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me


8 replies so far

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therealSteveN

8633 posts in 1786 days


#1 posted 08-19-2020 02:50 PM

Now ya done it, everyone is gonna be tearing their planes apart looking for S R & L.

-- Think safe, be safe

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SMP

4712 posts in 1117 days


#2 posted 08-19-2020 03:42 PM

Hmmmm, i have an old 19 around that age(not sure exact age) will check when i get around to it.

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Phil32

1558 posts in 1115 days


#3 posted 08-19-2020 11:11 PM

On the No.19, what is the explanation for the square notches at the top of the side curves?

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

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SMP

4712 posts in 1117 days


#4 posted 08-20-2020 12:05 AM

No golden ticket for me. I don’t get to go see Willie Wonka.

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drsurfrat

975 posts in 399 days


#5 posted 08-20-2020 12:12 PM



On the No.19, what is the explanation for the square notches at the top of the side curves?

- Phil32

I am pretty sure that they are “aftermarket” additions. But they are very even and clean, with no file marks. There is no japanning left anywhere near them to be definitive.
OR a wildly fantastic guess: It was a casting flaw that the subcontracted foundry made. The Stanley management
was notoriously demanding of perfection for pennies, and cancelled the contract; hence the rarity of the mark. :)

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

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Don W

20158 posts in 3779 days


#6 posted 08-27-2020 01:48 PM

Found on a type 6 #7

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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drsurfrat

975 posts in 399 days


#7 posted 08-27-2020 01:52 PM

Ahh, so cool. And you know your stuff about these. Any idea what to do now? :)

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

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Don W

20158 posts in 3779 days


#8 posted 08-27-2020 07:08 PM



Ahh, so cool. And you know your stuff about these. Any idea what to do now? :)

- drsurfrat

I’ve never known casting marks to effect value at all. I would do whatever it was you had in mind to begin with.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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