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New shop, what to put on the walls?

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Forum topic by david2011 posted 08-15-2020 06:49 AM 2279 views 0 times favorited 115 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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david2011

156 posts in 4823 days


08-15-2020 06:49 AM

It looks like my long awaited shop will break ground on Wednesday, Aug 19. I’ve been working on the design for months with a couple of CAD programs. One decision I still need to make is what to put on the interior walls. The choices are drywall or OSB. Without question drywall will look the best but the ability to hang items of moderate weight anywhere gives great appeal to OSB. The ceiling will still be drywall regardless.

What do you think?

-- David


115 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7022 posts in 3609 days


#1 posted 08-15-2020 10:34 AM

Just drywall suits me fine, I don’t have a problem hanging things but I can see the appeal of that. Even with OSB, you may have to cover it with drywall for fire purposes anyway.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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mike02719

303 posts in 4902 days


#2 posted 08-15-2020 11:33 AM

OSB was my choice because it is cheap, stronger than drywall, and much easier to install. Strength is critical in a shop. Over the years, the walls and ceilings take a lot of abuse because of different projects, wall hangings, etc. I put OSB on the ceiling as well. After it is painted, there is not much difference and will last much longer. Good Luck with your project.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

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Robert

4590 posts in 2597 days


#3 posted 08-15-2020 11:48 AM

OSB here. Mainly because I needed to save $ and picked up a bunch of extra sheets off a construction site for next to nothing.

I were building a new shop, I would probably go with drywall and definitely hire it out!

OSB doesn’t hold screws that well anyway you really have to go with 3/4 ply.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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ibewjon

2476 posts in 3909 days


#4 posted 08-15-2020 01:42 PM

I used 7 / 16 osb, covered with drywall for fire safety. Upper cabinets are hung on french cleats on studs, but having the osb behind makes hanging small items easy. And the osb behind the drywall also strengthens the drywall. I taped it myself, it is not the living room.

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david2011

156 posts in 4823 days


#5 posted 08-15-2020 01:46 PM

Thanks for the replies. The entire shop will be built by contractors. For once I’m paying for a turnkey job. Since I’m on the Texas Gulf Coast the shop will be insulated and air conditioned so open studs aren’t one of the options. Not only is A/C necessary for creature comfort but it’s also necessary to keep bare metal like cast iron machinery from rusting.

-- David

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Fred Hargis

7022 posts in 3609 days


#6 posted 08-15-2020 03:23 PM

One other thing to consider, the noise levels are reduced with drywall, the OSB seems to reflect more sound. Good luck with your choice.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DrTebi

402 posts in 4383 days


#7 posted 08-15-2020 04:21 PM


One other thing to consider, the noise levels are reduced with drywall, the OSB seems to reflect more sound. Good luck with your choice.

- Fred Hargis


Hmmmm…. I do not believe that that is true. Any hard and smooth surface will reflect sound waves. OSB, having a slightly uneven surface, may actually reflect less.

Vibration is a different story though. Drywall is denser, and would not “ring” as much as OSB. Soundwaves of lower frequencies, like those from large motors, may make OSB sing a bit more than drywall.

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Aj2

3884 posts in 2914 days


#8 posted 08-15-2020 04:40 PM

I vote for drywall. Osb would remind me roofing days the stuff stinks.

-- Aj

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3566 posts in 4060 days


#9 posted 08-15-2020 07:47 PM

I covered mine with drywall.

Some areas get a upper sheet of OSB, plywood or what have you over that for hanging things. Working out of boxes takes much of the fun out of work, so I want my layout tools and so on where I can see and reach for them.

Patterns, if displayed for an easy find, tend to require weird positionings too, so the nail or screw holding capacity is, again, important.

For cabinets, drywall is fine, because all I have to do is hit a 24” center. Even my “swinging display walls” don’t need plywood, because they have to have an iron angle bar to hang off of, and it’s about four feet long, so can be mounted on centers too.

In the end, doubling up, such as with OSB or ply over rock, certainly isn’t going to hurt the insulation any.

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pottz

17510 posts in 2100 days


#10 posted 08-15-2020 07:52 PM

osb definitely,then paint white.i dont think it’s a noise issue at all.if fire rating is an issue just cover the osb with drywall.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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WoodenDreams

1315 posts in 1027 days


#11 posted 08-15-2020 08:24 PM

I’d go with the Dry wall. When I hung my peg board up, I used 1×2 and 1×4 strips to use as a backing to bring out the pegboard. You can always add some ‘slat wall panels’ where you want them. About $36 per sheet. https://www.menards.com/main/paint/paneling-planking/paneling/dakota-trade-3-4-x-4-x-8-prefinished-slatwall-panel/lamslatwallwhite/p-1444428251813.htm

or something like this https://www.garagecabinets.com/garage-slatwall/

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Craftsman on the lake

3864 posts in 4554 days


#12 posted 08-15-2020 08:43 PM

Okay, another take on this….

I have drywall, painted with a light paint. Looks good. If you’ve got exceptional dust collection then that’s good. If you don’t, expect a perpetual dust collected wall. Try to wash it and after it dries it’s just a swirl of dust and it looks worse.

I speak from experience. So, as much as I like sheetrock for looks if I did it again I’d have to spend more money than I have on a dust collection system or use something that I can varnish so it wipes clean with something stronger than water.
A pleated filter doesn’t seem to necessarily cut it. Dust comes off the machines too. I’d need really good ($$) suction and really good collection points at each machine. The dust is a never ending battle.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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david2011

156 posts in 4823 days


#13 posted 08-15-2020 11:53 PM



Okay, another take on this….

I have drywall, painted with a light paint. Looks good. If you ve got exceptional dust collection then that s good. If you don t, expect a perpetual dust collected wall. Try to wash it and after it dries it s just a swirl of dust and it looks worse.

I speak from experience. So, as much as I like sheetrock for looks if I did it again I d have to spend more money than I have on a dust collection system or use something that I can varnish so it wipes clean with something stronger than water.
A pleated filter doesn t seem to necessarily cut it. Dust comes off the machines too. I d need really good ($$) suction and really good collection points at each machine. The dust is a never ending battle.

- Craftsman on the lake

That’s very interesting. What level of gloss is your paint? I was planning on satin but maybe semi-gloss would be better.

Because of my decades of building RC airplanes with balsa, I am going for good dust collection this time. Balsa dust has a lot of silica in it and is a terrible irritant. My dust collector is a Jet DC1200 with the 2 micron filter; 2 hp; 1200 cfm. A big Dust Deputy will be added to it. I plan on adding a ceiling mounted air filtration system as well. For smaller tools I have a Shop Vac with a Dust Deputy and the Rockler hose system for smaller tools. I have an opportunity to get rid of my Craftsman contractor’s saw and replace it with a decked out Craftsman hybrid cabinet saw. It has over arm dust collection as well as the port in the base so that should help with dust as well.

-- David

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david2011

156 posts in 4823 days


#14 posted 08-16-2020 12:01 AM



osb definitely,then paint white.i dont think it s a noise issue at all.if fire rating is an issue just cover the osb with drywall.

- pottz

For me it’s “either, or.” I don’t want the added expense of double dipping on the interior walls. I think the fire concern is great enough to steer me toward drywall. That is something I didn’t consider so all the comments on fire safety are appreciated. I’ve burned scraps of OSB and have seen that it is REALLY flammable. I can hang appropriately sized panels of nice ply with French cleats at strategic locations and attach them to studs. That will probably be the best end result. Another consideration is sound penetrating to the outside. I like to work late at night sometimes. I’m less concerned about noise inside the shop than I am noise that escapes. I’m in a quiet neighborhood and don’t want to annoy the neighbors.

-- David

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Richard Lee

397 posts in 1891 days


#15 posted 08-16-2020 12:09 AM

1/2” Plywood, painted white.
Only good thing about Drywall is the fire rating.

showing 1 through 15 of 115 replies

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