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V-groove cabinet door/drawer front design

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Forum topic by Ben posted 08-11-2020 02:38 PM 518 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ben

478 posts in 3710 days


08-11-2020 02:38 PM

I’m currently building carcasses for a new kitchen which will be painted. The customer wants a V-groove facade.

I’m leaning towards milling 4/4 soft maple into individual planks, then milling a chamfer on each edge and gluing together to form a slab for doors and drawer fronts. I’m concerned about stability, but this is the easiest way I can see building the fronts. The largest doors will be roughly 21” wide X 36” tall.

I want to avoid mdf – otherwise that would be an easy option, but milling the Vs with a router after the fact seems like it’s asking for complications or problems.

I could do a traditional tongue and groove with a “Z” brace/batten on the backside, but that seems time consuming, requires more shaper/router tooling, and complicates euro hinges.

Any recommendations for how to achieve this?

Thanks!


18 replies so far

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1324 posts in 1812 days


#1 posted 08-11-2020 04:08 PM

The panel, stile and rail or both?

I assume this design?

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1417 posts in 580 days


#2 posted 08-11-2020 04:53 PM

“to form a slab for doors and drawer fronts”

If you’re making slab doors they are going to warp and twist. Maybe you will get lucky with good wood and lay up, but I doubt.
I made a set when I was young and dumb, ended up replacing the whole set with maple ply and a trim.

I guess as they say, YMMV, but I won’t ever make them again.

Talk them into a door like Jack posted.
Or order them from a company that will warranty them.

-- I only know... what I know....

View Rich's profile

Rich

5886 posts in 1442 days


#3 posted 08-11-2020 05:15 PM


Talk them into a door like Jack posted.

- LeeRoyMan

I like that door. It would look great in cottage-like design. It’d be simple to make too, since it’s a regular frame and panel door, but with some edges beveled before assembly.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View MPython's profile

MPython

298 posts in 665 days


#4 posted 08-11-2020 05:23 PM

I’ve made several solid frame and panel doors and cabinet sides with the panels made of individual solid wood slats. Splines between each slat keep the panels flat and hide the spaces that might appear as the slats expand and contract. The top and bottom slats are tenoned into the frame. The others have short stub tenons that float in shallow grooves to allow for seasonal expansion and contraction. If the panel is tall, I tenon the middle slat into the frame as well to keep it from bowing. Here are some photos:

Vertical slats with”V” grooves would be easy with this procedure.

View Ben's profile

Ben

478 posts in 3710 days


#5 posted 08-11-2020 07:20 PM

Thanks.
Here’s the look the customer wants:

Maybe MDF is the way to go. I just hate working with that stuff. Or maybe “Ranger Board?” I had never heard of that stuff but a friend mentioned it.

Nice work MPython.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1324 posts in 1812 days


#6 posted 08-11-2020 09:06 PM

Nothing wrong with MDF, it just gets a bad rap from woodworkers, not cabiinet makers. We lovev it…

View Ben's profile

Ben

478 posts in 3710 days


#7 posted 08-21-2020 06:04 PM

I can’t talk my customer into MDF, unfortunately. I’m not liking the options:
-T&G V joint with batten
- glued up slab with batten, Vs routed after (or without batten, and hope for the best)

Is there another option?

I see no reason whatsoever to make a tongue and groove joint for a painted door panel, when I can just glue up a panel and route Vs for the same effect, without the paint getting gross in the joint.

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JackDuren

1324 posts in 1812 days


#8 posted 08-21-2020 06:16 PM

There ya go. Your call, your warranty…I was a professional Cabinet maker for 30 years. If I can’t guarantee it I won’t make it… That’s my story and I’m sticking to it…

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1417 posts in 580 days


#9 posted 08-21-2020 06:24 PM

Looks like your mind is made up.
V-groove after glue up.
Battens for sure.

When you do your glue up try to keep the panel as flat as possible, and when you put on the battens,
be sure the panel is as flat as panel.
Clamp the battens to the door while it is on a flat surface like your table saw. This “might” negate some of the initial warpage if there is any.

Good Luck,
Either way it will be a learning experience, hopefully class won’t cost too much.

-- I only know... what I know....

View Ben's profile

Ben

478 posts in 3710 days


#10 posted 08-21-2020 06:27 PM

No, my mind is definitely not made up.

What do you guys think about using baltic birch? It appears my customer is open to that.
I hate the look and complications of the battens on this overlay/frameless kitchen.

Would a T&G panel with battens have less expansion/contraction than a solid wood panel? I can’t quite get my head around that.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1417 posts in 580 days


#11 posted 08-21-2020 06:37 PM


No, my mind is definitely not made up.

What do you guys think about using baltic birch? It appears my customer is open to that.
I hate the look and complications of the battens on this overlay/frameless kitchen.

Would a T&G panel with battens have less expansion/contraction than a solid wood panel? I can t quite get my head around that.

- Ben


Still going to move if they are glued together. They would have to be in a frame.

Even the solid panel with battens, is going to move. The battens might make it worst, who knows though, not me.

If I were making them I would be using maple ply with a 1/8 edge banding.

(I have an edge bander though)

-- I only know... what I know....

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3604 posts in 2347 days


#12 posted 08-21-2020 07:07 PM

+1 agree with Jack.
Painted cabinets = light weight MDF machined door panels.

Decorative grooving typically uses a small radius at edges of flat or at tip if ‘V’ shape, to avoid spray finishing issues in corners and cracks when dropped in shop. YMMV

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View pottz's profile

pottz

11296 posts in 1837 days


#13 posted 08-21-2020 10:49 PM

+1 jacks idea if your gonna paint.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1417 posts in 580 days


#14 posted 08-21-2020 11:23 PM



+1 jacks idea if your gonna paint.

- pottz

Yeah, you’ll get 2 or 3 good years out of them. ;)

-- I only know... what I know....

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pottz

11296 posts in 1837 days


#15 posted 08-22-2020 01:15 AM


+1 jacks idea if your gonna paint.

- pottz

Yeah, you ll get 2 or 3 good years out of them. ;)

- LeeRoyMan


what,no way,you’ll get at least 4 !!! ;-)

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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