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How to resaw wood slabs on bandsaw

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 08-10-2020 06:19 PM 364 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

407 posts in 2229 days


08-10-2020 06:19 PM

I have these two pieces of thick Mango wood I want to resaw so they are half as thick.
Trying to figure out how to do this safely on my bandsaw and came up with two approaches:

1. Use a tall fence.

2. Attach the slabs to a longer straight board perhaps with double sided tape and use the board to guide it through.
Not sure the tape would work as the pieces are not flat so maybe use screws and fill the holes afterwards.

Thanks for any advice

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


12 replies so far

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therealSteveN

6241 posts in 1422 days


#1 posted 08-10-2020 06:49 PM

Anytime I resaw anything I make sure I have run it across my Jointer, or somehow gotten the fence side flat as I could, before resaw. If not pretty much anything you do resaw will have the same irregular face on the cut side, as you did on the fence side. Doing that you have not one face to clean up, but now 2.

Jointer, planer with a balancing sled jig, router sled, or hand planes. Gotta do something to smooth one face first.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Phil32

1130 posts in 751 days


#2 posted 08-10-2020 08:26 PM

If you are resawing the mango blocks to prepare them for turning on a lathe, the precision of the cut may be less important than if this will be a critical piece in a furniture construction. It would help to get constructive ideas if we knew your plan.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Rich

5865 posts in 1437 days


#3 posted 08-10-2020 09:19 PM

I never agree with therealSteveN, but he’s got this one right. Not only do I ensure the face that’s against the fence is flat, I also joint the edge so it’s square to the face. That way it’s stable on the table.

Excuse me if he mentioned that in his post. My reading comprehension is lacking (inside joke).

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Peteybadboy

2183 posts in 2797 days


#4 posted 08-10-2020 09:28 PM

All that and check on youtube if you are not sure how to set up your band saw for resaw. One more thing don’t force it.

-- Petey

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pottz

11208 posts in 1832 days


#5 posted 08-10-2020 09:37 PM



I never agree with therealSteveN, but he s got this one right. Not only do I ensure the face that s against the fence is flat, I also joint the edge so it s square to the face. That way it s stable on the table.

Excuse me if he mentioned that in his post. My reading comprehension is lacking (inside joke).

- Rich


at first i thought you were someone i knew-lol.i also agree with TRSN,same procedure i use.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Rich

5865 posts in 1437 days


#6 posted 08-10-2020 09:40 PM

Oh, and be sure to use the correct blade. You want a variable pitch blade designed for resawing with the pitch varying between 2 and 3 (or maybe 4) TPI. Timberwolf makes a very respectable blade for an affordable price. The carbide blades like the ReSaw King are pricey up front, but cut far better and, since they can be resharpened several times for a fraction of the cost of a new blade, they are a good value.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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GrantA

2850 posts in 2255 days


#7 posted 08-10-2020 09:57 PM

Yeah what they said :-)
You don’t want it wobbly at all, and you want the right blade, I love Timberwolf blades. And of course you want the guides setup properly for the blade. I recommend a separate dedicated bandsaw if possible hehe.. a man can’t have too many bandsaws

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mdhills

39 posts in 3480 days


#8 posted 08-10-2020 10:48 PM

You can make a resaw sled if you’d rather have it held on leading/trailing edges by a few short screws, rather than jointing edges. Same advice about blade selection and not forcing it would apply.

Matt

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Joel_B

407 posts in 2229 days


#9 posted 08-11-2020 06:50 PM

Thanks for the feedback.
My blade is 4 TPI so I guess I am ok there

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Joel_B

407 posts in 2229 days


#10 posted 08-11-2020 06:58 PM

I am thinking if I make a sled, then I don’t need to flatten the surfaces first.
Then I can run the other side through the planer afterwards.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Rich

5865 posts in 1437 days


#11 posted 08-11-2020 07:04 PM


I am thinking if I make a sled, then I don t need to flatten the surfaces first.
Then I can run the other side through the planer afterwards.

- Joel_B

That’s not a good plan, IMO. Flatten the face, square the edge that will ride on the table and you’ll get much better cuts. Additionally, when you are resawing multiple pieces from a board, plane or joint the face of the remaining piece before resawing the next slice from it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Joel_B

407 posts in 2229 days


#12 posted 08-11-2020 08:44 PM


I am thinking if I make a sled, then I don t need to flatten the surfaces first.
Then I can run the other side through the planer afterwards.

- Joel_B

That s not a good plan, IMO. Flatten the face, square the edge that will ride on the table and you ll get much better cuts. Additionally, when you are resawing multiple pieces from a board, plane or joint the face of the remaining piece before resawing the next slice from it.

- Rich

Rich,

I will keep that under consideration.

Thanks

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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