LumberJocks

Flattening boards wider than jointer that has permanent rabbeting shelf

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by nickbatz posted 08-10-2020 02:15 AM 1129 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View nickbatz's profile (online now)

nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


08-10-2020 02:15 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer milling

My jointer is a 1940s Davis and Wells model with a rabbeting shelf that’s part of the infeed table.

The usual technique of removing the shelf, then running the board over and letting it get a lip that you then even out in the thickness planer isn’t possible.

So I’m thinking I’ll just lower the infeed table a hair each pass. None of the boards I’m dealing with needs a lot of straightening, so it’s unlikely to take more than a couple of passes – nothing extreme.

Is that crazy?

TIA


16 replies so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

5868 posts in 1437 days


#1 posted 08-10-2020 04:46 AM

If I understand correctly what you’re describing, I’ve done that. If they’re pretty straight and just need to be planed smooth, it works. Then I realized that if they were that straight to start with, why not just use my planer? It works too.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View nickbatz's profile (online now)

nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


#2 posted 08-10-2020 05:25 AM

Thanks.

Well, I wouldn’t try to straighten them on the jointer if they were ready for the planer. But chances are I’ll just run them through the planer on a sled if necessary anyway.

View paridgerunner's profile

paridgerunner

43 posts in 629 days


#3 posted 08-10-2020 11:37 AM

I place a 1/8” hardboard sled on my infeed table and lower the infeed by the thickness of the sled. I have a cleat on the underside of the sled that grabs the end of the infeed table.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1173 posts in 3666 days


#4 posted 08-10-2020 01:23 PM

I used to run the piece through and flip it end for end (same side down) after each pass. Now I mostly just run it through, remove the lip with a handplane and repeat until the warp, twist or cup is gone. Works well on boards up to about 9 inches wide on my 6-inch jointer and is surprisingly quick (quicker than a planer sled most of the time).
I’m intrigued by paridgerunner’s solution, though, and may give it a try.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View paridgerunner's profile

paridgerunner

43 posts in 629 days


#5 posted 08-10-2020 02:14 PM

Here is one of the links I found describing the use of the sled on the infeed table.

https://heartwoodrockinghorses.com/2016/12/30/how-to-joint-and-plane-a-board-wider-than-your-jointer/

It also describes an alternative method, skipping the jointer sled, which I have not tried.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5868 posts in 1437 days


#6 posted 08-10-2020 02:42 PM


Here is one of the links I found describing the use of the sled on the infeed table.

- paridgerunner

I’m not seeing the benefit of the sled on the jointer. I use that method often by simply removing the guard and using the rabbeting capability of my jointer (20 y/o Jet JJ6). The Grizzly model he’s using can do the same thing.

I do like his sled for the planer. I use a long one with cleats which rides with the board through the planer. His way looks better since there’s no sled to have to manage during the cut. I’m definitely going to try it out.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1173 posts in 3666 days


#7 posted 08-10-2020 05:18 PM

Rich,
The issue is that, without some kind of workaround, you only get a single pass through the jointer. After that, the raised lip will hit on the rabetting shelf (unless, like OP mentioned, you have a removable shelf). Using an infeed table you can remove as much wood as the table is thick before it starts catching on it.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View nickbatz's profile (online now)

nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


#8 posted 08-10-2020 05:40 PM

I like paridgerunner’s idea. Much better than mine, which would have wasted a lot anyway.

And the same sled would work for both the jointer and the thickness planer.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5868 posts in 1437 days


#9 posted 08-10-2020 06:09 PM


Rich,
The issue is that, without some kind of workaround, you only get a single pass through the jointer. After that, the raised lip will hit on the rabetting shelf (unless, like OP mentioned, you have a removable shelf). Using an infeed table you can remove as much wood as the table is thick before it starts catching on it.

- jdh122

I’ve been doing it for over 20 years that I’ve owned that jointer and have never run into that issue. As the article mentioned, you will get an angle, but any board that’s going to need more than 1/8” removed to flatten isn’t worth working with without saving it for smaller pieces. Given a 6” jointer, the angle won’t exceed much past 1 degree and besides, the goal is to get a flat face to run on the planer sled, not parallel ones. That’s the planer’s job.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View nickbatz's profile (online now)

nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


#10 posted 08-10-2020 11:51 PM

Question about paridgerunner’s link: why does the sled have to be 1/4” narrower than the cutter head? Doesn’t it make sense to make the rabbet as thin as possible?

View metolius's profile

metolius

210 posts in 1578 days


#11 posted 08-11-2020 12:09 AM

I’d go straight to the planer with the lumber on a sled board, stabilized with wedges, and attached with a hot glue gun.

^ Some hickory in the process last week

-- derek / oregon

View paridgerunner's profile

paridgerunner

43 posts in 629 days


#12 posted 08-11-2020 12:15 AM


I ve been doing it for over 20 years that I ve owned that jointer and have never run into that issue. As the article mentioned, you will get an angle, but any board that s going to need more than 1/8” removed to flatten isn t worth working with without saving it for smaller pieces. Given a 6” jointer, the angle won t exceed much past 1 degree and besides, the goal is to get a flat face to run on the planer sled, not parallel ones. That s the planer s job.

- Rich

Rich,

I need to give it a try sometime without the sled and just end up with the angle.
In your experience, do you end up removing less material, as stated in the article?

I can see it removing less on the jointer, but do you end up removing extra on the planer to flatten the angle?

View paridgerunner's profile

paridgerunner

43 posts in 629 days


#13 posted 08-11-2020 12:17 AM



Question about paridgerunner s link: why does the sled have to be 1/4” narrower than the cutter head? Doesn t it make sense to make the rabbet as thin as possible?

- nickbatz

I think keeping the sled slightly narrower than your cutter head avoids the same issue you have dealing with the rabbeting ledge.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5868 posts in 1437 days


#14 posted 08-11-2020 12:42 AM


I need to give it a try sometime without the sled and just end up with the angle.
In your experience, do you end up removing less material, as stated in the article?

I can see it removing less on the jointer, but do you end up removing extra on the planer to flatten the angle?

- paridgerunner

As I mentioned earlier, if a board’s going to require much stock removal, I prefer to save it for smaller pieces that will be easier to mill and find a straighter board to use instead.

This isn’t something you want to be doing on 13/16 S2S if your goal is 3/4. If that’s your point about removing less material, then I say give it a go, but it’s risky, so have a plan B. You’re much safer shopping more carefully in the first place. Know what you’re buying for each part of the project. If it’s a table, some irregularity in the pieces for the legs and apron can be tolerated since you can just cut those to rough size on a band saw and go from there. Grain direction is the most important thing for legs. The boards for the top need to be chosen more carefully for straightness and a good grain pattern, especially if they’re wider than your jointer.

As a last resort, consider ripping the boards narrower on the band saw and glue them back up. It obviously wont work for a something like a book matched top. It’s really up to the woodworker.

So much of this varies depending on the situation. There’s no way I could give a set of steps to follow that will work in every case.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View nickbatz's profile (online now)

nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


#15 posted 08-11-2020 02:38 AM

Okay, thanks for the replies.

I like the idea of using hot melt glue to hold the wood. It doesn’t get absorbed, does it.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com