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Tablesaw vs Bandsaw For My Needs

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Forum topic by AutomatedIngenuities posted 08-09-2020 06:46 PM 502 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AutomatedIngenuities

5 posts in 92 days


08-09-2020 06:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw tablesaw

I’ve been preparing over the past few months to take on a little venture of making end grain inlay cutting boards and end grain products in general. I have a 4×4 cnc router, planner, jointer, sliding compound mitre saw and track saw but now am in the midst of purchasing another fairly expensive tool and I want to choose the best tool for my needs.

I’m tossed up between if a tablesaw or a bandsaw meets my needs better. I’m familiar with using both tools so am not totally unaware of the capabilities of either, and it is a possibility of purchasing both in the long run, but I’m unsure if that’s necessary as I want either the tablesaw or bandsaw to be very job specific.

For tablesaw I’d want to go exclusively with sawstop and am considering the 36” Contractor Saw with T Glide Fence. For bandsaw, I’m a bit more open to brands, but it will definitely be 14”-18” floor standing bandsaw (Rikon 10-342, or Grizzly G0513X2BF comes to mind).

I’ve listed my pros and cons of the two tools below and would like to hear any opinions which would be considered better suited for the task. As stated above I intend on making end grain products and alot of the final shaping will come from using the CNC. Keep in mind I’ve made due without the tablesaw or bandsaw thus far and am quite confident either tool will not be utilized outside of the ability to assist in making end grain products.

Tablesaw Pros:
• Good dust collection
• Quicker setup for rip and cross cuts
• Ability to support wider material

Tablesaw Cons:
• Blade kerf
• Safety
• Shop space and maneuverability
• No Resaw Ability

Bandsaw Pros:
• Thinner Kerf (material savings)
• Maneuverability of machine and less square footage of shop space
• Quieter machine
• Safer then tablesaw
• Resaw Capability (good for inlays)

Bandsaw Cons:
• Blade Tracking and possibility of not having 90 degree cuts if not set up correctly
• Material hang off (possibility of making sliding table to counter this)
• Dust collection not that great

Looking forward to reading your thoughts. Thanks for the assistance.


11 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8212 posts in 3051 days


#1 posted 08-09-2020 06:58 PM

IMO, the band saw is more versatile. It can do pretty much anything the table saw can do, except for non-through cuts like dado’s, and it does a lot more that the TS can’t do. If I had to choose between them, the band saw would get my first pick.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View whope's profile

whope

219 posts in 3297 days


#2 posted 08-09-2020 07:37 PM

Based on what you have, I’d go with the bandsaw as well. Consider a Laguna bandsaw. I’m quite happy with mine.

-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with an Hammer.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1124 posts in 763 days


#3 posted 08-09-2020 08:13 PM

As far as safety, that’s the user and the method he uses the machine. It’s more tempting to get closer to the blade with your hands with the bandsaw on some cuts. And ooops. Which you get first will depend on the work you do or planning on.

Put them on a mobile base if you need maneuverability. Easier with the table saw. The bandsaw is taller and narrower, so could have tipping issues, depends on the surface your rolling on.

Blade kerf is not a issue. If your doing a dado or rabbit cut, Change blades to a (FTG) flat top grind https://vermontamerican.com/circular-saw-blade-anatomy-grind-types/ . As far as resaw with the table saw, I do resaw materials up to 6” with my table saw. And make yourself a zero clearance throat plate for the narrow rips. I use the table much more often than the bandsaw.

If you don’t have a miter saw, cross cuts on a boards is easier on the table saw verses bandsaw. Unless you plan on doing all your cross cut with a hand saw.

As far as noise level, my table saw is quieter than my bandsaw.

Which works best for you is what counts.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1958 posts in 3645 days


#4 posted 08-09-2020 08:36 PM

+1 on Laguna. My 14 SUV has great dust collection. But from my point of view, I would rather be making cutting board blocks on a table saw, unless you are doing curved designs. There will be many differing opinions on this.

View AutomatedIngenuities's profile

AutomatedIngenuities

5 posts in 92 days


#5 posted 08-09-2020 08:43 PM



Based on what you have, I d go with the bandsaw as well. Consider a Laguna bandsaw. I m quite happy with mine.

- whope

I considered the Laguna bandsaw but some of the reviews I saw said the fence is difficult to align, but perhaps that was with the specific unit the user had.


As far as safety, that s the user and the method he uses the machine. It s more tempting to get closer to the blade with your hands with the bandsaw on some cuts. And ooops. Which you get first will depend on the work you do or planning on.

Put them on a mobile base if you need maneuverability. Easier with the table saw. The bandsaw is taller and narrower, so could have tipping issues, depends on the surface your rolling on.

Blade kerf is not a issue. If your doing a dado or rabbit cut, Change blades to a (FTG) flat top grind https://vermontamerican.com/circular-saw-blade-anatomy-grind-types/ . As far as resaw with the table saw, I do resaw materials up to 6” with my table saw. And make yourself a zero clearance throat plate for the narrow rips. I use the table much more often than the bandsaw.

If you don t have a miter saw, cross cuts on a boards is easier on the table saw verses bandsaw. Unless you plan on doing all your cross cut with a hand saw.

As far as noise level, my table saw is quieter than my bandsaw.

Which works best for you is what counts.

- WoodenDreams

Hmm you have made good points here. I agree you do have to watch your fingers with the bandsaw, but in my.opinion I was always much more aware with the bandsaw.

Putting things in a mobile base I can do but to me it’s more about square footage versus packing away for me.

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AutomatedIngenuities

5 posts in 92 days


#6 posted 08-09-2020 08:51 PM



+1 on Laguna. My 14 SUV has great dust collection. But from my point of view, I would rather be making cutting board blocks on a table saw, unless you are doing curved designs. There will be many differing opinions on this.

- ibewjon

No curved designs, just 90 degree cuts is what I envision.

I never considered the 14 SUV I will have to dive into some reviews and compare.

Any particular reason why you would prefer to be making them on a TS?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3340 posts in 2650 days


#7 posted 08-09-2020 09:03 PM

For solid woodworking I think a bandsaw is a must. With a bandsaw you can break down large slabs of rough lumber quickly. If you have access to Rough sawn lumber a bandsaw is machine you want.
I prefer a minimum of 20 inch saw. You have larger choice of blades you can buy. The blades will be longer and cost More but last much longer.
I used to have two 14 and 20 I sold the 14.
If your buying lumber from a lumber yard and it’s straight line on one side you probably wouldn’t see much advantage of a bandsaw. You would be paying someone for that service and missing the fun of cutting wood on a bandsaw.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1958 posts in 3645 days


#8 posted 08-09-2020 09:22 PM

For some reason, the 14 SUV is listed away from the other 14” saws. Plenty of power. I would want the larger table on the TS for what you are doing. And no blade drift to deal with. Some bandsaw blades drift more than others, but why deal with it at all. You want to cut blocks off of long pieces. The stock length can be much longer than on even a large bandsaw. I have both saws, plus 2 radial arm saws. For cutting board blocks, I prefer the RAS because the stock isn’t being moved during the cut.

View AutomatedIngenuities's profile

AutomatedIngenuities

5 posts in 92 days


#9 posted 08-09-2020 09:25 PM



For solid woodworking I think a bandsaw is a must. With a bandsaw you can break down large slabs of rough lumber quickly. If you have access to Rough sawn lumber a bandsaw is machine you want.
I prefer a minimum of 20 inch saw. You have larger choice of blades you can buy. The blades will be longer and cost More but last much longer.
I used to have two 14 and 20 I sold the 14.
If your buying lumber from a lumber yard and it’s straight line on one side you probably wouldn’t see much advantage of a bandsaw. You would be paying someone for that service and missing the fun of cutting wood on a bandsaw.
Good Luck

- Aj2

The places I buy hardwood lumber from only sell rough sawn so I suppose that goes with your point that bandsaw would be ideal. I was thinking 17-18” bandsaw but I’d have to take a look at what’s out there for 20”.

I appreciate all the responses so far. All of your experienced opinions are helping to justify my single tool purchase.

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Aj2

3340 posts in 2650 days


#10 posted 08-09-2020 09:54 PM

I forgot to add dust collection is very important on a bandsaw. Maybe even more then a tablesaw.
Here’s a look at my 20 inch saw. Too the right is the 14 pm great little saw very smooth running. Sometimes space is more important.

-- Aj

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AutomatedIngenuities

5 posts in 92 days


#11 posted 08-11-2020 03:20 AM



I forgot to add dust collection is very important on a bandsaw. Maybe even more then a tablesaw.
Here’s a look at my 20 inch saw. Too the right is the 14 pm great little saw very smooth running. Sometimes space is more important.
- Aj2

Nice infeed & outfeed tables you got there.

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