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Forum topic by Robert posted 08-09-2020 03:10 PM 363 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Robert

3936 posts in 2329 days


08-09-2020 03:10 PM

I’m mostly interested in what you used for heaters, dehumidiers, fans,etc.

Is insulation necessary? It doesn’t get too cold where but I thought insulation would help regulate the temp.

Seems most of the info I’ve seen on LJ is solar.

I do not want to build a solar kiln.

Please do not show me your solar kiln. Thx guys!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


10 replies so far

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6245 posts in 1422 days


#1 posted 08-09-2020 06:39 PM

On a Goofle search instead of Kiln, put dehumidification kiln, the world is your oyster with the proper word use on a search. Almost all of the links under kiln only are solar

-- Think safe, be safe

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1937 posts in 3641 days


#2 posted 08-09-2020 08:44 PM

A dehumidifier under a plastic sheet over the stickers wood works for me. Run a drain hose out of the enclosure, don’t use the dehumidifier storage tank. I ran some wires out to connect to my mini ligno moisture meter. The dehumidifier provides the heat, and a small fan helps circulation. I let the stacks air dry inside a garage for about a year first, I am not in a rush as I have plenty of lumber. The ‘kiln’ is for final drying.

View MPython's profile

MPython

298 posts in 660 days


#3 posted 08-10-2020 01:10 PM

Not what you asked for, but this might be off interest to some here. I learned this from a good friend who is a high-enbd plane maker. It’s called a “finishing kiln” for small wood parts. I purchased some Gabon ebony for saw handles from a reputable dealer. It was represented to have been air dried for fifteen years. When it arrived it was at 18% moisture content – way too high to be worked successfully. I built this simple finishing kiln and dried it to 8% in about three months with no warping or checking.

It’s simply a chimney made of 1/4” plywood and some 1 1/2” X 1 1/2” X 60” pine for legs, open at the top and bottom. It has a light socket at the bottom with an incandescent light bulb and a switch for convenience. The light bulb generates a little heat which, in turn creates a gentle convection up the chimney. The warmed air passes by the wood blanks that rest on a wire rack about halfway up the chimney.

I just turned on the light, shut the door and left it in the corner of my shop, checking the M/C every few days. It took less time than I expected to get the ebony to a workable moisture level. Not fancy and probably not applicable to large boards, but it was perfect for the small pieces I needed.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1064 posts in 2067 days


#4 posted 08-10-2020 01:28 PM



On a Goofle search …...

- therealSteveN


. does goofle get better results when searchin???
View Robert's profile

Robert

3936 posts in 2329 days


#5 posted 08-10-2020 01:30 PM

@theealSteveN


On a Goofle search instead of Kiln, put dehumidification kiln, the world is your oyster with the proper word use on a search. Almost all of the links under kiln only are solar

- therealSteveN

Thanks for the info.

I have several 100 BF of walnut and poplar that has been air drying in a shed for a little over a year. In my area the equilibrium MC is anywhere from 12-15%, so I don’t need to bring it down that much.

After looking at a couple of the articles available, I’ve decided maybe all I need is a plastic tent. with a dehumidifier and small fan.

I’ve treated all the lumber with Boramate, so I shouldn’t be worried about killing bugs.

Does this sound feasible? My thinking is the heat generated by the DH combined with the moisture reduction should bring it down to 8% fairly rapidly.

What do you think?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1937 posts in 3641 days


#6 posted 08-10-2020 01:48 PM

That is what I do. Just don’t try to dry it down too fast.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6245 posts in 1422 days


#7 posted 08-10-2020 03:34 PM


On a Goofle search …...

- therealSteveN

. does goofle get better results when searchin???

- tomsteve

Probably knot. :-)

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

6245 posts in 1422 days


#8 posted 08-10-2020 03:38 PM



That is what I do. Just don t try to dry it down too fast.

- ibewjon

Yes you want to discourage fast drying.

The only real problem I have seen with the plastic tent methods, it there is no easy way to control the heat/temp. A fan will lower, but often just eliminate enough heat to work, so if you use a fan, you need to do it with some type of thermostat. Time you get everything in place you coulda built a kiln…..

-- Think safe, be safe

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1937 posts in 3641 days


#9 posted 08-10-2020 04:53 PM

If I had a place for a permanent kiln, that would be great. But I can roll the plastic and store it in a garbage bag, and use the fan for other things. I saw a nice solar kiln in central Illinois, but I don’t have the yard space. I did buy some nice sassafras lumber from the man, along with a flat master sander.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3936 posts in 2329 days


#10 posted 08-10-2020 05:10 PM


The only real problem I have seen with the plastic tent methods, it there is no easy way to control the heat/temp. A fan will lower, but often just eliminate enough heat to work, so if you use a fan, you need to do it with some type of thermostat. Time you get everything in place you coulda built a kiln…..

- therealSteveN

How about rigid foam?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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