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Forum topic by Bazyliszek posted 08-08-2020 02:22 AM 450 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bazyliszek

25 posts in 53 days


08-08-2020 02:22 AM

What’s a good price on a Powermatic Model 100 Planer?

I am between this and a DW735x with stand.

I’m asking because there is a Powermatic 100 for sale relatively close to me.

Looking at some older threads online, it seems $500-$600 was a good price around 2005.

Thanks!


8 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

3585 posts in 2342 days


#1 posted 08-08-2020 05:47 AM

Condition is everything with older planer like the PM 100.
They were US made, and there is practically no OEM support for parts.

IMHO – PM100 fully restored and in perfect working order is worth as much as new $500 DW735 to any one who likes old ‘ARN’, maybe a little more? The DW735 is noisy, knife eating, overly expensive lunch box planer (IMHO).
But a pile of rust PM100, or one that needs gears/shafts hand cut by machinist, are barely worth scrap metal value; unless it has some saleable parts to other PM100 owners.
The middle area of tool condition makes it very hard to suggest a tool’s value. Things like 3 phase motor support via VFD or single phase conversion costs, tends to reduce the value too.

Old US made wood working machine users tend to congregated on the OWWM.org forums. You can find original manuals and parts list plus more on the PM100 via the vintagemachinery.org sister site to OWWM forums.
You will need to register to see all the OWWM forums. They have a private classified forum for sale of old US machines and parts. Might find some comparison prices on that forum. If you buy the PM100, expect will see you over there. :-)

Just note one rule of OWWM; they don’t allow appraisals discussions. It is a technical forum, not a sales site.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Bazyliszek's profile

Bazyliszek

25 posts in 53 days


#2 posted 08-08-2020 01:43 PM



Condition is everything with older planer like the PM 100.
They were US made, and there is practically no OEM support for parts.

IMHO – PM100 fully restored and in perfect working order is worth as much as new $500 DW735 to any one who likes old ARN , maybe a little more? The DW735 is noisy, knife eating, overly expensive lunch box planer (IMHO).
But a pile of rust PM100, or one that needs gears/shafts hand cut by machinist, are barely worth scrap metal value; unless it has some saleable parts to other PM100 owners.
The middle area of tool condition makes it very hard to suggest a tool s value. Things like 3 phase motor support via VFD or single phase conversion costs, tends to reduce the value too.

Old US made wood working machine users tend to congregated on the OWWM.org forums. You can find original manuals and parts list plus more on the PM100 via the vintagemachinery.org sister site to OWWM forums.
You will need to register to see all the OWWM forums. They have a private classified forum for sale of old US machines and parts. Might find some comparison prices on that forum. If you buy the PM100, expect will see you over there. :-)

Just note one rule of OWWM; they don t allow appraisals discussions. It is a technical forum, not a sales site.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz

The DW735 usually gets top reviews compared to its competition. Is there a planer you would recommend?

I like the powermatic 100 because it has an induction motor, that’s easily replaceable. That said, I have no idea what to look for to see if it’s worth the price or just a pile of scrap.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

7782 posts in 1560 days


#3 posted 08-08-2020 02:38 PM

watch out for rule#5 :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6241 posts in 1422 days


#4 posted 08-08-2020 02:45 PM

You don’t have info on where you are? I’m in SW Ohio, and I have, and a lot of sellers local have 15” heavier planers for near, or what you are talking about. I’d widen your choices. Comparing a 735 to a stationary tool is a hard pick, they essentially do the same work, but they are ~~~ how to say it…. Workers with far different work habits.

Run that 735 all day long, it’s gonna crap out fast, a 15”, and it goes all day long.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Bazyliszek's profile

Bazyliszek

25 posts in 53 days


#5 posted 08-08-2020 05:16 PM



You don t have info on where you are? I m in SW Ohio, and I have, and a lot of sellers local have 15” heavier planers for near, or what you are talking about. I d widen your choices. Comparing a 735 to a stationary tool is a hard pick, they essentially do the same work, but they are ~~~ how to say it…. Workers with far different work habits.

Run that 735 all day long, it s gonna crap out fast, a 15”, and it goes all day long.

- therealSteveN


You don t have info on where you are? I m in SW Ohio, and I have, and a lot of sellers local have 15” heavier planers for near, or what you are talking about. I d widen your choices. Comparing a 735 to a stationary tool is a hard pick, they essentially do the same work, but they are ~~~ how to say it…. Workers with far different work habits.

Run that 735 all day long, it s gonna crap out fast, a 15”, and it goes all day long.

- therealSteveN

I’m in Rochester, NY. Just a hobbyist. I dont need a 15” planer, as it’s really heavy and larger than I need.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6415 posts in 3341 days


#6 posted 08-08-2020 05:41 PM

I have a Delta 15” planer, and it doesn’t weigh as much as that PM, and the overall width may be the same. Just saying….....

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

3585 posts in 2342 days


#7 posted 08-09-2020 03:31 AM

+1 Difference between a PM100, and the DW735, is night and day. The were built to service different needs.

+1 Difference between PM100 and normal 15” four post industrial machine is very small:
PM100: 12” cutter head, 400lb, 24D x 32W foot print

Delta DC-380: 15” cutter head, 350lb thanks to open stand, and 24D x 30W without extension tables folded up. Feed table extensions where optional, but largest add another 12in to front and back depth. A PM15 15” planer with heavy closed stand weighs same 400lbs as the PM100.

DW735 mobile base is 22D x 24W, without extra 12” in/out feed table extensions.

Hence, they all use about same floor space.
The biggest difference is the Industrial planers use larger 2-3HP motors, and happily whack off 1/8-3/16” cuts from rough lumber; while the 120v universal motor on the DW735 struggles with 1/16” and offends your ears at near 100DB noise levels when power is on. The 10K RPM heads on industrial planers are still noisy, but they are much quieter than DW735, and most noise is when planing wood.

Sorry I am not a fanboy for DW735, like all the others?
My story:
Bought one new to replace a Delta 22-580 due all the glowing positive reviews, and it was horrible decision. Constantly wished I had kept the 22-580. After about 3 months of use, and putting on new knives every 3-4 weeks (using only a couple days a week); I gave up and looked for better solution. My old Delta used a set of knives every 3-6 months with same use. Many folks say the answer to poor knife edges is to add a $500 shellix head? Spending $1000 for lunch box planer made of plastic is way to much IMHO. Decided the better option was the getting a 15” planer. Grizzly sells a low end 15” planer new for $1000.

I found a used Delta DC-380 on CL for $200. Spend $200 on new bearings, new out feed roller; and had like new machine for less than DW735 pile of plastic cost me. Industrial planers use 1/8” thick knives that last whole lot longer, than the razor blade thin versions on DW735. Ran that DC-380 for year with same knives, shifted once to clean up nicks. Then put a new set on before I sold it, as I found a rebuild-able PM15 with larger motor for cheap.
IMHO – Spending $500 on DW735 not a good value. Sure the machine works, and some folks like it despite the disadvantages. But the disposable knives nick if look them funny! Problem for me was any of the harder hardwoods (oak, hickory, etc) that had any knots (even small pin knots), would always result in nicked knives. Practically never had boards come out baby bottom smooth due nick issues. Once you add the helical head, the value proposition is even worse.
To me a better value is a used 22-580 (as long out feed roller has not disintegrated), the 13” Ridgid planer, or another other well rated ~$300 planer you can find. Spending an extra $200+ for the DW735 knife eating monster infuriates me every time I think about doing it.

IMHO – The decision to buy and use planer needs to be based on type and quantity of usage. If using a planer several days a week for rough cut lumber, you will eventually want a big beefy 15” or 12-13” old ARN planer. If you use the planer once a month, and/or rarely mill rough lumber; than just about any lunch box planer thins lumber for a hobbyist, you don’t need to buy the most expensive knife eater in market, DW735. About the only place I think the DW725 with helical head makes sense, is small shop with only 120V power where you mill mostly figured wood and you make money on projects to support the high price tag.

Thanks for reading.

PS – There are many threads on LJ concerning planer purchase decisions between lunch box and industrial style, if you search forums. One common thing you will read: once you use a big dog planer, you never want to go back to lunch box planer again. :-)

Best Luck with purchase decision

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Bazyliszek's profile

Bazyliszek

25 posts in 53 days


#8 posted 08-09-2020 03:44 AM



+1 Difference between a PM100, and the DW735, is night and day. The were built to service different needs.

+1 Difference between PM100 and normal 15” four post industrial machine is very small:
PM100: 12” cutter head, 400lb, 24D x 32W foot print

Delta DC-380: 15” cutter head, 350lb thanks to open stand, and 24D x 30W without extension tables folded up. Feed table extensions where optional, but largest add another 12in to front and back depth. A PM15 15” planer with heavy closed stand weighs same 400lbs as the PM100.

DW735 mobile base is 22D x 24W, without extra 12” in/out feed table extensions.

Hence, they all use about same floor space.
The biggest difference is the Industrial planers use larger 2-3HP motors, and happily whack off 1/8-3/16” cuts from rough lumber; while the 120v universal motor on the DW735 struggles with 1/16” and offends your ears at near 100DB noise levels when power is on. The 10K RPM heads on industrial planers are still noisy, but they are much quieter than DW735, and most noise is when planing wood.

Sorry I am not a fanboy for DW735, like all the others?
My story:
Bought one new to replace a Delta 22-580 due all the glowing positive reviews, and it was horrible decision. Constantly wished I had kept the 22-580. After about 3 months of use, and putting on new knives every 3-4 weeks (using only a couple days a week); I gave up and looked for better solution. My old Delta used a set of knives every 3-6 months with same use. Many folks say the answer to poor knife edges is to add a $500 shellix head? Spending $1000 for lunch box planer made of plastic is way to much IMHO. Decided the better option was the getting a 15” planer. Grizzly sells a low end 15” planer new for $1000.

I found a used Delta DC-380 on CL for $200. Spend $200 on new bearings, new out feed roller; and had like new machine for less than DW735 pile of plastic cost me. Industrial planers use 1/8” thick knives that last whole lot longer, than the razor blade thin versions on DW735. Ran that DC-380 for year with same knives, shifted once to clean up nicks. Then put a new set on before I sold it, as I found a rebuild-able PM15 with larger motor for cheap.
IMHO – Spending $500 on DW735 not a good value. Sure the machine works, and some folks like it despite the disadvantages. But the disposable knives nick if look them funny! Problem for me was any of the harder hardwoods (oak, hickory, etc) that had any knots (even small pin knots), would always result in nicked knives. Practically never had boards come out baby bottom smooth due nick issues. Once you add the helical head, the value proposition is even worse.
To me a better value is a used 22-580 (as long out feed roller has not disintegrated), the 13” Ridgid planer, or another other well rated ~$300 planer you can find. Spending an extra $200+ for the DW735 knife eating monster infuriates me every time I think about doing it.

IMHO – The decision to buy and use planer needs to be based on type and quantity of usage. If using a planer several days a week for rough cut lumber, you will eventually want a big beefy 15” or 12-13” old ARN planer. If you use the planer once a month, and/or rarely mill rough lumber; than just about any lunch box planer thins lumber for a hobbyist, you don t need to buy the most expensive knife eater in market, DW735. About the only place I think the DW725 with helical head makes sense, is small shop with only 120V power where you mill mostly figured wood and you make money on projects to support the high price tag.

Thanks for reading.

PS – There are many threads on LJ concerning planer purchase decisions between lunch box and industrial style, if you search forums. One common thing you will read: once you use a big dog planer, you never want to go back to lunch box planer again. :-)

Best Luck with purchase decision

- CaptainKlutz

Yes, I like the idea of having an industrial planer, even if I wouldn’t use it much.

I’m not a fan of Delta though. I dont see much being wrong with an old planer except the bearings or motor, which are easily replaceable. The problem for me, is placing that 400lbs in a CRV and getting it out with only 2 people and no lift haha.

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