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Forum topic by 85percent posted 08-05-2020 07:08 PM 367 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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85percent

4 posts in 50 days


08-05-2020 07:08 PM

I just finished my reclaimed wood table by sanding and painting and then sanding again.

I need to put a protective coat over the wood now but I want to keep the table looking as close to how it looks now with the color and finish.

What water proofing coating can I use that will change the look and color of the table as little as possible

?


10 replies so far

View LesB's profile

LesB

2600 posts in 4294 days


#1 posted 08-05-2020 10:18 PM

I’m a bit confused by the “painting and sanding again” part of your opening sentence but based on the picture I would recommend a water based polyurethane. It drys clear but goes on milky looking so any runs or drips can be easily spotted and corrected. Preferably use one rated for use on floors which will be more durable. At least 3 coats, 4 would be better, sanding lightly between coats with 320 grit sand paper. After the final coat has cured for a couple of weeks you can apply a carnauba paste was with a white 3M pad and buff with a soft cloth for a nice finish.

If you are brushing on the poly I suggest you do it when the ambient temprature is between 65 and 75 degrees. Cooler than that and drys slow enough for dust particles to settle in the finish. Warmer and it drys so quickly that it may leave brush stroke ridges that will need to be sanded smooth. Use a good quality brush.

-- Les B, Oregon

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85percent

4 posts in 50 days


#2 posted 08-05-2020 10:46 PM

Thank you, I should have explained bit more. This wood already had a finish on it that I hated. So I sanded the entires thing and painted it with gray, and sanded it again to give it an aged look.

So the water based poly won’t change the color of the wood or anything? It won’t make it darker?

Thanks again

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Aj2

3337 posts in 2649 days


#3 posted 08-05-2020 10:51 PM

All film finishes will change the color. How much is anyone’s guess your project is uniquely your own. My favorite finishes are made by General finishes. If it’s that important to you the best thing to do is buy a small can and test it out. Stay away from the Urethane it definitely has a amber color.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3601 posts in 2345 days


#4 posted 08-06-2020 02:49 AM

+1 Water based Polyurethane.
Would recommend Gemini WB poly. For more durable WB, try Renner 2 part WB poly. Only available from your local industrial coatings distributor, and requires spray equipment to apply.
Another good option is Sherwood CAB lacquer, which is one of the clearest solvent lacquers available; but again has to sprayed and comes from industrial Sherwin Williams supplier (rare to find inside corner SW paint store).

If you are not using better quality industrial coatings, best I can recommend is Varathane Ultimate Poly from BORG. It dries water clear. The Varathane Floor Finish Poly is a little more durable than regular poly, and would be my choice for table top. Follow the mfg directions closely for best performance. Very flexible application; spray, brush, wipe, and can even use a paint roller. I find Varathane tends to have slight blue tone, which is there to help it stay water clear. It can interfere with some color palette’s.

IME – GF poly acrylic is also water clear but is softer than most polyurethanes and would be my last choice for table top, but still ahead of any clear WB from Minwax in a pinch.

The GF Enduro Poly is decent WB poly. It dries clear, but can have a very subtle pink tone. Won’t notice it on dark wood, but it gets on my nerves used on white wood. GF Enduro also has a habit for the pink tones to get darker as it ages in the can. So use fresh stuff. If open can and find pink liquid, instead of barely pink tinted white color; don’t use it without testing to see if pink color tone works for you project.

What every you pick: test, test, test.
Always test the entire finish schedule on some samples to ensure you get what you desire.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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85percent

4 posts in 50 days


#5 posted 08-06-2020 03:08 AM

Soooo helpful!! Thank you really appreciate the time you took to respond!


+1 Water based Polyurethane.
Would recommend Gemini WB poly. For more durable WB, try Renner 2 part WB poly. Only available from your local industrial coatings distributor, and requires spray equipment to apply.
Another good option is Sherwood CAB lacquer, which is one of the clearest solvent lacquers available; but again has to sprayed and comes from industrial Sherwin Williams supplier (rare to find inside corner SW paint store).

If you are not using better quality industrial coatings, best I can recommend is Varathane Ultimate Poly from BORG. It dries water clear. The Varathane Floor Finish Poly is a little more durable than regular poly, and would be my choice for table top. Follow the mfg directions closely for best performance. Very flexible application; spray, brush, wipe, and can even use a paint roller. I find Varathane tends to have slight blue tone, which is there to help it stay water clear. It can interfere with some color palette s.

IME – GF poly acrylic is also water clear but is softer than most polyurethanes and would be my last choice for table top, but still ahead of any clear WB from Minwax in a pinch.

The GF Enduro Poly is decent WB poly. It dries clear, but can have a very subtle pink tone. Won t notice it on dark wood, but it gets on my nerves used on white wood. GF Enduro also has a habit for the pink tones to get darker as it ages in the can. So use fresh stuff. If open can and find pink liquid, instead of barely pink tinted white color; don t use it without testing to see if pink color tone works for you project.

What every you pick: test, test, test.
Always test the entire finish schedule on some samples to ensure you get what you desire.

Best Luck!

- CaptainKlutz


View bugradx2's profile

bugradx2

176 posts in 870 days


#6 posted 08-06-2020 03:15 AM

If you have a scrap piece from the project laying around then finish it the same way and try various finishes on that. If you don’t, then I would use the underside of the table or underside of a bench to try an option and see what you like. You can usually sand it back to get pretty close to your starting point if needed. If anyone says anything about the finish on the bottom looking weird throw them out of your life. You don’t need anyone that persnickety around!

-- The only thing not measured in my shop is time

View hkmiller's profile

hkmiller

244 posts in 933 days


#7 posted 08-08-2020 12:50 AM

I use Lemar CAB lacquer.

-- always something

View 85percent's profile

85percent

4 posts in 50 days


#8 posted 08-17-2020 02:52 PM

This is what I was talking about. I tried the Varathane Ultimate Poly and is made the wood a lot darker.

Is there something that would not

have this effect?

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5816 posts in 2239 days


#9 posted 08-17-2020 03:13 PM

Any top coat is going to darken it. What you can try is after applying something like the water based poly, lightly scuff sand it with a 220 or 320 grit sand paper. You don’t want to sand through the finish but scuffing it may lighten it a bit.

EDIT: Use a satin finish to start with or flat if you can find one. Also, I have used a Rustoleum flat clear acrylic in a rattle can when I wanted no sheen at all but it will still darken the color a little.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3601 posts in 2345 days


#10 posted 08-17-2020 10:39 PM

This is what I was talking about. I tried the Varathane Ultimate Poly and is made the wood a lot darker.
Is there something that would not have this effect?
- 85percent

Hmm.
Suggest you run an little experiment for some color education?

Wipe unfinished surface with mineral spirits or turpentine, and compare it to color of the WB poly coated area.
My guess it they will look same.
WB poly is one the clearest coatings available in market, often call ‘water clear’ or ‘water white’ color. Which means it looks just like a wet surface. You will not find any top coating that adds less color than water clear top coat! Even a coat of wax on raw wood will add some sheen and make it look near the same. Test it and check for yourself. ;)

+1 Can reduce the ‘wet’ look or gloss of poly by using a satin or flat finish version. It will look a little lighter.
The manual alternative is evenly scuff the surface with white plastic sanding pad (0000 steel wool equivalent), after it has thoroughly dried. I don’t like to use steel wool around WB coatings, due the chance for rust stains created by left over dust with next coat of WB finish. Can use the pads under your ROS to help create a consistent scratch pattern. Test on some scraps to learn how to scuff up gloss surface, not the project.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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