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Forum topic by CrankAddict posted 08-04-2020 03:20 PM 427 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CrankAddict

111 posts in 650 days


08-04-2020 03:20 PM

Quick background: I have a 36” round maple table top that I’m trying to prep. It has some glue residue as well as some raised lines from the nicked Dewalt planer blades. But otherwise, I went to great lengths to keep everything as flat as possible in the stock prep (6 boards) and glue up. So I don’t need a ton of material removal here and the card scraper seems like a good way to go.

I bought the Veritas variable burnisher thingy but I’m confused about how it can do all the steps I see in videos from Paul Sellers, Stumpy Nubs and Katz-Moses. Here’s the procedure I’m using:

1) file then sand card edge flat and square to sides
2) sand sides to remove burr

at this point I have a burr free, shiny-smooth squared off edge

3) Set Veritas burnisher to 0 degrees and make a few passes (my understanding is this produces a “T”)
4) Set it to 5 degrees and make a few more passes (this should roll the T’s tips down to be J’s)

The issue/question I have is all the videos I mentioned show “drawing out” the edge after the sanding/stoning step. They lay the card on the table flat and run the burnisher over the side. For example, 3:20 in this video: https://youtu.be/kPy7x1cXGo0?t=200

After that, the burnish the edge at an angle to roll the hook. But how would you do that draiwing-out step with the Veritas thing? And how big of a deal is it to not have this step between step 2 and step 3? My process is giving me shavings, not dust. So I don’t think I’m terribly far off. But it doesn’t last long. 1-2 mins of scraping and I have to redo the hook. Is that just normal for maple or is that because I’m not building a durable hook to begin with?

Thanks!


12 replies so far

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Rich

5865 posts in 1437 days


#1 posted 08-04-2020 03:42 PM

All the zero degree pass is going to do is burnish (read: polish) the face of the edge. Unless you’re Superman you won’t be able to generate enough force to create the T you are referring to. Try setting it to 15º and give it a few good, firm, passes. Be sure to clamp the scraper tightly in a vise with as little protruding upwards as you can. That’ll make it as stiff as possible so it doesn’t bend and throw off your angle.

For larger surfaces, take a look at a Stanley No. 80 style scraper plane. A number of brands are available and Veritas is a good one. It’s far more effective than a card scraper alone. Unfortunately, your Veritas burnisher won’t work well since the angle for a scraper plane is 45º, not 90, so you’ll need a good standard burnisher (a good thing to have around regardless).

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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CrankAddict

111 posts in 650 days


#2 posted 08-04-2020 06:30 PM

Thanks Rich. I went ahead and ordered that Veritas cabinet scraper and will give that a try too. Also got a traditional carbide burnisher and two diamond stones. It’s kind of funny because yeah, the card scraper is a butt simple tool but you need a $100+ support staff to keep $10 Mr. Simple working properly. I’ll have to just keep playing around with methods until I get something that works. I’m just paranoid about having this unfinished glued-up maple top sitting here while I figure it all out. Hopefully it doesn’t move around too much prior to finishing.

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shampeon

2167 posts in 3031 days


#3 posted 08-04-2020 06:43 PM

Well, technically all you need is a mill file to joint the edge, some sandpaper on a flat surface and a square piece of wood to polish the edge, and a rod of steel harder than the scraper to establish the burr (like a nail set). All of that is pretty inexpensive.

I can free hand a new burr pretty easily now, and the nice thing about a card scraper is that you can tell if you need to redo the burr pretty easily. Keep practicing. Apart from digging into wood with the corner, it’s hard to screw up the surface with a card scraper.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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Rich

5865 posts in 1437 days


#4 posted 08-04-2020 07:49 PM


Thanks Rich. I went ahead and ordered that Veritas cabinet scraper and will give that a try too. Also got a traditional carbide burnisher and two diamond stones. It s kind of funny because yeah, the card scraper is a butt simple tool but you need a $100+ support staff to keep $10 Mr. Simple working properly. I ll have to just keep playing around with methods until I get something that works. I m just paranoid about having this unfinished glued-up maple top sitting here while I figure it all out. Hopefully it doesn t move around too much prior to finishing.

- CrankAddict

For starters, I can guarantee you’ll be scraping like a champ in no time. Just be patient. The Veritas burnisher is a neat tool, and useful for quick touch up on a straight or convex edge, but other than that, it’s limited. It’s good to have, but not the only one you’ll need.

I find that a non-round burnisher is really versatile. The Pheil triangular burnisher is shaped like a rounded triangle. It gives you options for pressure. Using the flat side is much like a round burnisher, and as you turn it towards one of the corners, it gets more aggressive. Handy since some cards are more hardened than others.

I bought this one on a whim and really like it. Easy to keep in a pocket, and it has two carbide inserts; one round and one triangular. Carbide is a good upgrade (the Pheil is hardened steel). The only thing I don’t care for is the angled head. I’d rather it be straight and then I could eyeball the angle better based on the handle. It’s a minor complaint though.

Finally, be sure to check out some videos on setting up the scraper plane. It’s different from the card for the reason I mentioned above, so some sort of jig to stick a bastard file in that will hold it at a 45º angle is helpful. I made one years ago. Later I made a jig for the Worksharp. These days I use a Tormek attachment. All of them worked well.

Finally, the best tip I ever found for setting the blade in the plane is to use two pieces of paper to support the sole of the plane and then set the blade flush on the surface between. From there you can use the knob to set the cutting depth.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

2447 posts in 753 days


#5 posted 08-04-2020 08:03 PM

Paul Sellers has a video where you take a scrap of wood and saw a kerf at 45 to hold the 80 scraper blade at an angle so you only have to file straight across. Then you raise the blade I think its 1/16” and it will hold the burnisher at a working angle.

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CrankAddict

111 posts in 650 days


#6 posted 08-04-2020 08:06 PM

Thanks for all the tips guys!

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John Jardin

78 posts in 488 days


#7 posted 08-04-2020 08:45 PM

+1 for all of the above…great craftsmen

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SMP

2447 posts in 753 days


#8 posted 08-04-2020 08:55 PM

Here is a link to the video i mentioned
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=84QebLrnats

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

1974 posts in 395 days


#9 posted 08-04-2020 10:29 PM

For me it is stupid simple, and dirt cheap to get a card scraper in decent shape. A mill file, as mentioned above, then I do the refining with the steel shank of a screwdriver. And I clamp the scraper in a vice between two blocks of wood. A gooseneck scraper takes a bit more care, I use a smaller mill file for this, but exactly the same in principal.

I use these scrapers on just about every project I do, and they are by far one of my favorite tools. Done well, often, afterward, there is no need for sanding.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

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Aj2

3325 posts in 2645 days


#10 posted 08-04-2020 10:47 PM

I agree with everyone above just got to keep at it. Soon you’ll be cranking out a edge in no time at all. ( pun intended) :)
Goose neck scraper that’s the next step.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Axis39

336 posts in 445 days


#11 posted 08-05-2020 12:03 AM

I’ve used the Veritas burnisher for years. Running it on the zero degree setting does burnish and create a burr. then, run the thing at the 5 degree setting, and you’re rolling the burr over. It works fine.

Although, I will admit, I picked up a simple Hock burnishing rod and have been using that ever since with a little easier and quicker results.

I used screwdrivers before getting the Veritas burnisher. They worked fine… Not sure why I feel compelled to spend money some days….

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Rich

5865 posts in 1437 days


#12 posted 08-05-2020 12:50 AM


I ve used the Veritas burnisher for years. Running it on the zero degree setting does burnish and create a burr. then, run the thing at the 5 degree setting, and you re rolling the burr over. It works fine.

- Axis39

You are correct. I was mistaken. I haven’t used mine in ages since I got one I like better.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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