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Forum topic by TellMePlease posted 08-03-2020 03:37 AM 1473 views 0 times favorited 121 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TellMePlease

136 posts in 85 days


08-03-2020 03:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: building workshop tip question

Ok… so far you guys have helped me with making decisions on starting woodworking. Which tools to buy. Advice on what was supposed to be my first woodworking project (building a workstation out of my PM2000)....

Things have taken a turn. I all of a sudden realized that making my saw on wheels and rolling it up and down a ramp was a terrible idea. I also took another turn in my personally life and have decided that I’m not moving. Sooooooooo…. it turns out my first project is building a workshop. I had to share!!! I’m also still in the planning stages of the rest of it.

I just spent my weekend getting this going. Didn’t quite finish the entire floating floor as I would have hoped. Honestly. I’ve NEVER built anything before. It’s nothing special, but I’m proud of it. And I learned today that it is possible for your pain to hurt. Lol…

I’m going out of town next weekend but I will get started on the next stage in two weeks and I’m still a little vague on how I should go about the next stage. The building will be 16×24. I’m honestly thinking about building my trusses before my walls so I can streamline getting a roof on ASAP with the next upper layers not being treated wood. Thoughts?

I have other questions too!


121 replies so far

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John Smith

2651 posts in 1010 days


#1 posted 08-03-2020 12:20 PM

from a building standpoint; there are so many questions.
what part of the world are you in ?
are the main joist/supports pressure treated?
how are the joists attached to the footers ?
do you have to have a permit to build a structure ?
the list of questions here are endless.
(but it is looking great so far).

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

2850 posts in 2255 days


#2 posted 08-03-2020 12:27 PM

Ummmm are those 4×4s and 2×4s??
I applaud you for getting after it but please do some studying on basic framing. Floor joists should be 2×6 minimum, 2×4s can’t handle the load.
Are you doing this without a permit? If so are you in any sort of neighborhood? You can bank on somebody raining in your parade if the local building department catches wind.
Good luck with it! One day at a time :-)

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TellMePlease

136 posts in 85 days


#3 posted 08-03-2020 01:14 PM

I don’t need a permit where I live. (Chattanooga TN “area”) The only thing the commissioners office told me was that I needed an electrical inspection once it was wired.

And yes. All lumber for floating floor is pretreated. The skids, the joists, and the plywood going on top of that. I’m not done with the framing either. I’m going to put 14.5 inch brackets staggered amongst 3 rows in between the 16 inch center. And you may think I’m nuts, but I used 2×4x16 pretreated lumber for the 24” skids. I used 6 carriage bolts on on each beam to hold 3 rows of lumber staggering the 16“ and 8“ boards to make it 24” across. I then also used 3 inch exterior deck screws along the beams for added support. I also am making the outside frame doubled. I was thinking that would add support far the walls that will sit on the outer frame.

As for the floor joist, yes. I used 2×4 instead of 2×6. With the brackets, the support should suffice I would hope. Let me know if I’m utterly retarded. I’ve never done anything like this before

I also have not attached the joists to the footers yet. Is there a preferred method? I’ve only been at it for two days. I didn’t quite get as far as I wanted. Doing it solo with three little ones running around means I’ll have to top of stage one throughout the work week.

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ibewjon

1934 posts in 3641 days


#4 posted 08-03-2020 01:42 PM

Buy the trusses, don’t try to make them. They will be properly engineered and assembled. You don’t want the roof coming down on your head. And they can buy lumber cheaper than you, cut pieces with less waste, and assemble with jigs. It is worth the extra cost.

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John Smith

2651 posts in 1010 days


#5 posted 08-03-2020 01:55 PM

on your next trip to the Big Box Store, look in the book section
for a book on Building Sheds & Buildings.
building a structure of this magnitude with zero experience and plans
can lead you down a path of frustration you may not be able to get out of.
the book will cover just about anything you NEED to know to build a structure.
the first shop I built back in 1980 was about 24×30’. I built most of it alone,
including the roof trusses. I had a book to reference. (but I had a poured concrete slab).
it can be done if you take your time and have some sort of visual plans to go by.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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TellMePlease

136 posts in 85 days


#6 posted 08-03-2020 02:30 PM

I’m a jack of many trades and a master of none. But I can say that my one true strength is the ability to learn with a decent level of detail through self teaching. I definitely am putting a level of meticulous planning into what I am doing before I do it. I can’t stand flying blind.

Are trusses truly better to buy preassembled? I was honestly thinking about building all my trusses next since they are easily moved and stored. I found what seems to be a sturdy, yet simple, design that I can make a quick template on my subfloor with random wood waste. That way when my walls go up, I can immediately do the trusses. I’ll take a look at prebuilt ones.

I also have not completely decided on which direction I’m going on the door. Should I go to a salvage place and buy a big “normal door”?? Should I build a double door? Does either have pros and cons to n regards to keeping the building climate controlled?

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

2850 posts in 2255 days


#7 posted 08-03-2020 03:14 PM

Your stick built trusses will be about as good as your foundation, and that’s not saying much… We hate to see resources wasted, and the direction you’re headed it won’t be long before this “shop” has to be rebuilt. Get a book to reference. Salvage your 2×4s for the walls.

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controlfreak

1217 posts in 449 days


#8 posted 08-03-2020 04:15 PM

+1 on the 2×4 floor, I just don’t think that is a sound foundation. While you still have time I would repurpose the studs for, well studs. I would also place some metal over each support block to act as a barrier to termites. You are very low to the ground there and I would Probably use treated wood anywhere below the plywood. I would also decide if you ever want to add heat or air now so you have an opportunity to insulate while building.

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TellMePlease

136 posts in 85 days


#9 posted 08-03-2020 04:43 PM

I spoke to a few on site shed building contractors about my flooring design with the 2×4 (which everything is pretreated). Apparently when they took out the consideration for relative building codes on their area, they seemed to all say that the strength integrity with using 2×4s at 16’ center with brackets every 3-4 feet should be alright. In addition, using the pretreated 3/4 plywood will also add strength integrity to the floor. From what I’m hearing from those who do on site shed building, I should be fine. I do appreciate the advise and concerns. It was enough to make me dig at it a little more, but I think I’ll continue the floor as planned.

And most definitely… I will add more insulation now. That part honestly slipped my mind. Much easier to do that now than later.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1934 posts in 3641 days


#10 posted 08-03-2020 05:08 PM

How is it anchored to mother earth? Is it just sitting on blocks, or anchored to poured piers? The wind can get under a raised structure like that, and move it enough for doors and windows not to work, or even more damage. And yes, sheds are built with 2×4 floors, but not being used for heavy cast iron machines like table saws and anything else in your future as the hobby expands. Run electrical under the floor for the table saw, along with dust collection duct. You want to minimize tripping hazzards.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118134 posts in 4425 days


#11 posted 08-03-2020 05:21 PM

Hi Tellme
I’m a 30+ year contractor and yes 2×4 sub-deck is not the norm but by cutting the spans down 3-4” OC you should be fine ,you don’t have to build or buy trusses you can stick frame it starting with a built-up ridge beam ,it’s more time consuming and a little bit of a challenge for you to cut the properer angle and birds mouth but once you get one you will have a pattern for both sides assuming you get your ridge beam centered properly. All said and done if it were me I would use factory trusses just for the convenience and speed, The cost in my area for factory-made trusses is probably about 25-35% more than the material to stick build it so it depends on what your budget will take and if you want to gain the experience of building your own or stick building.
You mentioned you were not sure which way you want the door to swing, if you have it swing in you will be using up space but that is the most typical way have exterior doors swing. If you haven’t covered your floor yet you might think about running wiring for your table saw so you don’t have to run a cord overhead or across the floor,usually I would suggest you run some ducting for dust collection too,but your floor is too close to the ground for that.
It was suggested you get a book from the box store about how to build your shop but I’ve many of the books written about woodworking and construction can be way off base because the many of the people write them have not actually done what their writing about. I think if this old house has a video on the subject Tommy Silva is one the best carpenter/contractors out there that really knows what he’s talking about.
Good luck with your build, your welcome to PM me if you feel I can help with questions.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

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TellMePlease

136 posts in 85 days


#12 posted 08-03-2020 07:43 PM

I’m totally going to build my trusses. Just not quite clear on every detail yet. But I’m thinking a simple rafter design with the birds mouth and ridge beam. I’m thinking 3 inch pitch with 4 inch overhang. I suppose after the course of this thread I should go with 2×6 for the rafters. Lol. Little vague on where I should put the OC (considering either 16 or 24).... I am planning to have a second 2×4 along the top of the walls to distribute the weight where centering the rafters in line with the wall joists isn’t so detrimental. My original plan for my walls is 2×4x8 nontreated on 16 OC.

Thoughts?

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GrantA

2850 posts in 2255 days


#13 posted 08-03-2020 07:46 PM

I’d strongly recommend 9 or 10ft walls, You’ll thank me soon enough

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118134 posts in 4425 days


#14 posted 08-03-2020 08:15 PM

It depends on the snow load and type of roofing you have in mind,but if in doubt go 16” on center 2×6, if you don’t have much snow go with what’s called 4n 12 pitch, a 4” of drop for every foot of run. there are a couple of videos out there on how to build trusses , here’s one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6fTaqxeR34

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

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a1Jim

118134 posts in 4425 days


#15 posted 08-03-2020 08:53 PM

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